Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol (1987)

PG | 88 mins | Comedy | 3 April 1987

Director:

Jim Drake

Writer:

Gene Quintano

Producer:

Paul Maslansky

Cinematographer:

Robert Saad

Editor:

David Rawlins

Production Designer:

Trevor Williams

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY

Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol was the fourth installment in the comedy franchise, which kicked off with the successful Police Academy (1984, see entry). A number of actors reprised their roles from the first three movies, including Steve Guttenberg as “Sgt. Carey Mahoney,” Bubba Smith as “Moses Hightower,” Michael Winslow as “Larvell Jones,” David Graf as “Eugene Tackleberry,” George Gaynes as bumbling “Commandant Eric Lassard,” and Marion Ramsey as “Laverne Hooks.” Several actors who joined the series in the second installment reprised their roles as well, including Bobcat Goldthwait as “Zed,” Tim Kazurinsky as “Sweetchuck,” and Lance Kinsey as “Lt. Proctor.” Actor G. W. Bailey reprised his role as “Captain Harris,” a character he played in the first movie, but not in the first two sequels.        Producer Paul Maslansky had been with the franchise since the beginning, but director Jim Drake was new to the series. Screenwriter Gene Quintano had penned the third installment of the series.
       Maslansky told the 11 Apr 1987 Long Beach Press-Telgram that the franchise owed much of its success to its ensemble cast, which returned for each film. He felt the audience remained “loyal” because of the familiar characters, as well as the “good-natured,” non-mean-spirited humor. In the 27 Mar 1987 NYT, he noted that the series was hugely successful overseas because of sight gags, which did not require knowledge of American culture, and became increasingly popular with each movie. Overseas, Police Academy grossed $50 million, Police Academy 2 earned $52 million, and Police Academy 3 grossed $60 million. In America, the trend was the reverse: ... More Less

Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol was the fourth installment in the comedy franchise, which kicked off with the successful Police Academy (1984, see entry). A number of actors reprised their roles from the first three movies, including Steve Guttenberg as “Sgt. Carey Mahoney,” Bubba Smith as “Moses Hightower,” Michael Winslow as “Larvell Jones,” David Graf as “Eugene Tackleberry,” George Gaynes as bumbling “Commandant Eric Lassard,” and Marion Ramsey as “Laverne Hooks.” Several actors who joined the series in the second installment reprised their roles as well, including Bobcat Goldthwait as “Zed,” Tim Kazurinsky as “Sweetchuck,” and Lance Kinsey as “Lt. Proctor.” Actor G. W. Bailey reprised his role as “Captain Harris,” a character he played in the first movie, but not in the first two sequels.        Producer Paul Maslansky had been with the franchise since the beginning, but director Jim Drake was new to the series. Screenwriter Gene Quintano had penned the third installment of the series.
       Maslansky told the 11 Apr 1987 Long Beach Press-Telgram that the franchise owed much of its success to its ensemble cast, which returned for each film. He felt the audience remained “loyal” because of the familiar characters, as well as the “good-natured,” non-mean-spirited humor. In the 27 Mar 1987 NYT, he noted that the series was hugely successful overseas because of sight gags, which did not require knowledge of American culture, and became increasingly popular with each movie. Overseas, Police Academy grossed $50 million, Police Academy 2 earned $52 million, and Police Academy 3 grossed $60 million. In America, the trend was the reverse: Police Academy made $82 million, the sequel $55 million, and the third film $44 million. In all, according to the Long Beach Press-Telegram, the first three films “grossed a half-billion dollars.”
       Principal photography for Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol began on 9 Sep 1986 in Toronto, Canada, according to the 10 Oct 1986 DV production chart.
       Actor David Spade made his big-screen debut in the film, playing skateboarder “Kyle.” The skateboard stunts were done by professional skateboarders Tommy Guerrero, Tony Hawk, Lance Mountain, Mike McGill, Chris Miller, and Steve Caballero. All six were spotlighted in the end credits.
       Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol opened on 1,757 screens on 3 Apr 1987, taking in $8.5 million in its first three days of release, the 7 Apr 1987 DV reported. After six weeks in release, the film had grossed $25.8 million, according to the Box Office Mojo website.
       The film was followed by three more installments: 1988’s Police Academy 5: Assignment Miami Beach; 1989’s Police Academy 6: City Under Siege; and 1994’s Police Academy 7: Mission to Moscow (see entries). An animated television series ran for sixty-five episodes in 1988-1989, while a syndicated live-action television series ran for twenty-six episodes in 1997–1998.
       End credits state: “Special Thanks to the Ontario Ministry of Government Services and The Gator Bowl Association.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Oct 1986.
---
Daily Variety
7 Apr 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 1987
p. 3, 34.
Long Beach [CA] Press-Telegram
11 Apr 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Apr 1987
Calendar, p. 6.
New York Times
27 Mar 1987.
---
New York Times
4 Apr 1987
p. 1, 12.
Variety
8 Apr 1987
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
And
as Commandant Lassard
Also starring:
and the Kirkland family:
Police officials:
Their translators:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Paul Maslansky Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
Skateboard 2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Aerial cam
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Addl film ed
Addl film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set buyer
Asst set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Scenic artist
Head painter
Const supv
Head carpenter
Prop master, 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus supv
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
Addl orch
SOUND
Supv sd ed
ADR ed
Sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer, 2d unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Loc mgr
Scr supv
Canadian casting
Prod coord
Asst to Mr. Maslanski and Mr. Drake
Casting asst
Extras casting
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Prod secy
Prod secy
Talent coord
Prod assoc
Office asst
Unit pub
Unit pub
Const supv
Transportation coord
Driver capt
Head driver
Loc caterer
Loc caterer
Loc mgr, 2d unit
Cont, 2d unit
Prod coord, 2d unit
Transportation, 2d unit
Utility asst, 2d unit
Aerial coord
Pilot
Pilot
Pilot
Pilot
Aerial mechanic
Aerial mechanic
Parachutes provided by
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Neal Israel and Pat Proft.
SONGS
“Citizens On Patrol,” performed by Michael Winslow and The L.A. Dream Team, produced by Steve Tyrell, written by Mike Stuart and Arthur Funaro, The L.A. Dream Team appears courtesy of MCA Records
“Rock The House,” written and performed by Darryl Duncan
“I Like My Body,” performed by Chico De Barge, written by Gary Taylor
+
SONGS
“Citizens On Patrol,” performed by Michael Winslow and The L.A. Dream Team, produced by Steve Tyrell, written by Mike Stuart and Arthur Funaro, The L.A. Dream Team appears courtesy of MCA Records
“Rock The House,” written and performed by Darryl Duncan
“I Like My Body,” performed by Chico De Barge, written by Gary Taylor
“It's Time To Move,” performed by S.O.S. Band, produced by Jason Bryant, written by Rick Boston, Eric Lowen and Dan Navarro, S.O.S. Band appears courtesy of Tabu Records
“Winning Streak,” written and performed by Garry Glenn
produced by Steve Tyrell and Garry Glenn
“Rescue Me,”performed by Family Dream, written by Rudy Pardee, Michael Perison and Victor Brooks
“Dancin' Up A Storm,” performed by Stacy Lattisaw, produced by Jellybean, written by Sandy Sherman and Janice Liebhart
“Let's Go To Heaven In My Car,” performed by Brian Wilson, written by Brian Wilson, Eugene E. Landy and Gary Usher, produced by Brian Wilson, co-produced by Gary Usher
“Shoot For The Top,” performed by Southern Pacific, written by Kurt Howell and Harry Maslin, Southern Pacific appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
“It Doesn't Have To Be This Way,” performed by The Blow Monkeys, produced by Michael Baker, written by Dr. Robert, The Blow Monkeys appear courtesy of RCA/Ariola Limited
“El Bimbo,” written by Claude Ganem, performed by Jean-Marc Dompierre and his Orchestra, Courtesy of Arthur Young Enterprises, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 April 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 3 April 1987
Production Date:
began 9 September 1986
Copyright Claimants:
Warner Brothers, Inc. Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Dates:
23 March 1987 30 April 1987
Copyright Numbers:
PAu931576 PA322004
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor ®
Duration(in mins):
88
Length(in feet):
7,842
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28552
SYNOPSIS

At the Police Academy, Commandant Eric Lassard announces plans for a new program called “Citizens On Patrol,” or “COP.” Lassard explains that citizens are often resentful that police cannot be everywhere to solve every crime, but with COP, they will become police allies. COP will be more than a Neighborhood Watch program, because it will train citizens in police methods. The state governor wants to unveil the program at the International Police Seminar in London, England, the following month. Calling COP “the Lassard Method,” the commandant claims, “It will change community relations all around the world.” However, Captain Thaddeus Harris believes the idea of civilians doing police work is “asinine,” and warns it will threaten real police officers’ job security. Police Commissioner Hurst informs Harris that since the governor loves the program, they will support it until he changes his mind. Sergeant Carey Mahoney and his partner, Larvell Jones, as well as Moses Hightower, Eugene Tackleberry, and Laverne Hooks—three former academy cadets now on the police force—are put in charge of training. They drive around town trying to recruit citizens. Meanwhile, an unruly group of college-age skateboarders create pandemonium in a shopping mall, then elude the arriving tactical police officers. When they are finally apprehended and charged with resisting arrest, wrecking a police car, and disrupting a shopping mall, a judge finds them “guilty as hell.” However, Sgt. Mahoney speaks on their behalf, suggesting that an alternate sentence might be better than prison. He recruits the skateboarders into COP. Other officers recruit elderly citizens, including Mrs. Lois Feldman, at a retirement home. On the first day of training, Lassard gives a speech welcoming the recruits, and reporters are on ... +


At the Police Academy, Commandant Eric Lassard announces plans for a new program called “Citizens On Patrol,” or “COP.” Lassard explains that citizens are often resentful that police cannot be everywhere to solve every crime, but with COP, they will become police allies. COP will be more than a Neighborhood Watch program, because it will train citizens in police methods. The state governor wants to unveil the program at the International Police Seminar in London, England, the following month. Calling COP “the Lassard Method,” the commandant claims, “It will change community relations all around the world.” However, Captain Thaddeus Harris believes the idea of civilians doing police work is “asinine,” and warns it will threaten real police officers’ job security. Police Commissioner Hurst informs Harris that since the governor loves the program, they will support it until he changes his mind. Sergeant Carey Mahoney and his partner, Larvell Jones, as well as Moses Hightower, Eugene Tackleberry, and Laverne Hooks—three former academy cadets now on the police force—are put in charge of training. They drive around town trying to recruit citizens. Meanwhile, an unruly group of college-age skateboarders create pandemonium in a shopping mall, then elude the arriving tactical police officers. When they are finally apprehended and charged with resisting arrest, wrecking a police car, and disrupting a shopping mall, a judge finds them “guilty as hell.” However, Sgt. Mahoney speaks on their behalf, suggesting that an alternate sentence might be better than prison. He recruits the skateboarders into COP. Other officers recruit elderly citizens, including Mrs. Lois Feldman, at a retirement home. On the first day of training, Lassard gives a speech welcoming the recruits, and reporters are on hand to cover the program. Citizens learn self-defense, writing arrest reports, and life-saving techniques. After Lassard leaves for the London conference, Captain Harris is put in charge of training, but since he believes that COP should really stand for “Collection of Pissants,” he is determined to see the program fail. Several officers play pranks on Harris, telling him about a restaurant with a great salad bar, but it turns out to be a gay bar instead. In the shower, someone substitutes a can of mace for Harris’s spray-on deodorant. They also play pranks on Harris’s assistant, Lt. Proctor, including using a construction crane to pick up a Porta-Potty while he is inside, and moving it to a football field in front of thousands of fans. When Mahoney and Jones put superglue on Captain Harris’s bullhorn, he ends up in the hospital with the instrument stuck to his lips. Meanwhile, in London, Commandant Lassard brags about the COP program and invites police officials from around the world to witness the program in action. On the streets, however, the program goes awry. Lois Feldman tries to arrest a trafficker in stolen goods, but he turns out to be an undercover officer who has spent three months infiltrating a fencing operation. Captain Harris suspends COP pending an investigation. Lassard returns from London with international police officers eager to see the program. A group of thugs known as the Ninjas are arrested, but they steal a policeman’s gun, lock the cops in jail cells, and escape. Seeing the Ninjas rushing out of the precinct, Lois Feldman radios other officers. The Ninjas drive to the Williams County Air Show and escape in stolen hot air balloons, but Captain Harris and Lt. Proctor commandeer another balloon and give chase. Firing a warning shot, they puncture their own balloon and crash it into a river. Skateboarders Arnie, Kyle, and Tommy Conklin rescue them before their gondola basket goes over a waterfall. Another officer jumps from a small plane onto the top of the Ninjas’s balloon, and slides down into the basket to arrest them. Carey Mahoney and reporter Claire Mattson arrive in a hot air balloon with the Police Academy logo and drink a champagne toast. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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