Walk Like a Man (1987)

PG | 86 mins | Comedy | 17 April 1987

Director:

Melvin Frank

Writer:

Robert Klane

Producer:

Leonard Kroll

Cinematographer:

Victor J. Kemper

Production Designer:

Bill Malley

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
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HISTORY

End credits state: “Teddy Ruxpin® provided courtesy of World of Wonder, Inc., and Alchemy II, Inc., © 1986 Alchemy II, Inc., all rights reserved.”
       Principal photography began on 3 Feb 1986 in Los Angeles, CA, with the working title Bobo, according to the 11 Feb 1986 HR. The 5 Feb 1986 DV reported the film was shot on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s Stage 28 in Culver City, CA, and on locations throughout the Los Angeles area. The 23 Apr 1986 Var stated production had wrapped.
       The 26 Jul 1987 LAT reported the film was originally scheduled for national release in Nov 1986, then Feb 1987, then May 1987. However, the film never received a national release. It was test marketed in Denver, CO, Boston, MA, and Toronto, Canada, with the title Walk Like A Man, on 17 Apr 1987. After that, it opened in a few other cities, taking in a total of $321,500 after three weeks, according to the 11 May 1987 DV box-office report. The LAT article stated the film was released to drive-in theaters in Jun 1987 as the second film in a double bill, paired with Benji The Hunted (1987, see ... More Less

End credits state: “Teddy Ruxpin® provided courtesy of World of Wonder, Inc., and Alchemy II, Inc., © 1986 Alchemy II, Inc., all rights reserved.”
       Principal photography began on 3 Feb 1986 in Los Angeles, CA, with the working title Bobo, according to the 11 Feb 1986 HR. The 5 Feb 1986 DV reported the film was shot on Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s Stage 28 in Culver City, CA, and on locations throughout the Los Angeles area. The 23 Apr 1986 Var stated production had wrapped.
       The 26 Jul 1987 LAT reported the film was originally scheduled for national release in Nov 1986, then Feb 1987, then May 1987. However, the film never received a national release. It was test marketed in Denver, CO, Boston, MA, and Toronto, Canada, with the title Walk Like A Man, on 17 Apr 1987. After that, it opened in a few other cities, taking in a total of $321,500 after three weeks, according to the 11 May 1987 DV box-office report. The LAT article stated the film was released to drive-in theaters in Jun 1987 as the second film in a double bill, paired with Benji The Hunted (1987, see entry). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Sep 1985.
---
Daily Variety
5 Feb 1986.
---
Daily Variety
16 Apr 1987
p. 2, 6.
Daily Variety
11 May 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Apr 1987
p. 5, 106.
Los Angeles Times
26 Jul 1987.
---
Variety
23 Apr 1986.
---
Variety
22 Apr 1987
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Film by Melvin Frank
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Key grip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men`s ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Orch
Mus rec
Mus rec facility
SOUND
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup des
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Unit pub
Computer software
STAND INS
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
SOURCES
SONGS
"Walk Like A Man," performed by Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, courtesy of Bob Gaudio and Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons Partnership
"Sidewalk Talk," performed and produced by Jellybean, courtesy EMI America Records.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Bobo
The Bobo
Release Date:
17 April 1987
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 19 June 1987
Production Date:
3 February--mid April 1986
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 June 1987
Copyright Number:
PA333472
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Panaflex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
86
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In a mountainous wilderness area of the Pacific Northwest, Henry Shand and his ten-year-old son, Reggie, discover a gold mine. They collect the gold, but a heavy snowstorm moves in. They hitch dogs to their dog sled to get back to civilization before they are trapped by the storm. With Henry leading the dog pack, and Reggie pushing behind, the dogs take off pulling the sled, while Henry’s two-year-old son, Robert, affectionately known as “Bobo,” rides in the sled. Once Reggie steers the sled onto the path, he jumps onboard, but accidently knocks Bobo into the snow and the toddler is lost. Henry becomes a multi-millionaire because of the gold mine, but spends the rest of his life searching the mountains for his son. However, he never finds him. Twenty-eight years later, Penny Grant, an animal behaviorist who studies wolves, goes camping in the woods. A pack of wolves runs by, but one of the wolves hits its head on a tree branch and is knocked unconscious. The other wolves run away when Penny comes to investigate, but she discovers this wolf is actually an adult human with long scraggly hair and beard. She takes this “wolf-man” to H. P. Truman, who rented her the camp site. Truman says there are tales of humans being raised by wolves and shows her old newspaper articles about Bobo’s disappearance. Recalling that Bobo had a horse-shoe shaped mark on his rear end from the time when his older brother tried to mark him with a branding iron, Truman checks and discovers the mark. Truman telephones the Shands to let them know Penny is bringing Bobo home to them. The Shands live in ... +


In a mountainous wilderness area of the Pacific Northwest, Henry Shand and his ten-year-old son, Reggie, discover a gold mine. They collect the gold, but a heavy snowstorm moves in. They hitch dogs to their dog sled to get back to civilization before they are trapped by the storm. With Henry leading the dog pack, and Reggie pushing behind, the dogs take off pulling the sled, while Henry’s two-year-old son, Robert, affectionately known as “Bobo,” rides in the sled. Once Reggie steers the sled onto the path, he jumps onboard, but accidently knocks Bobo into the snow and the toddler is lost. Henry becomes a multi-millionaire because of the gold mine, but spends the rest of his life searching the mountains for his son. However, he never finds him. Twenty-eight years later, Penny Grant, an animal behaviorist who studies wolves, goes camping in the woods. A pack of wolves runs by, but one of the wolves hits its head on a tree branch and is knocked unconscious. The other wolves run away when Penny comes to investigate, but she discovers this wolf is actually an adult human with long scraggly hair and beard. She takes this “wolf-man” to H. P. Truman, who rented her the camp site. Truman says there are tales of humans being raised by wolves and shows her old newspaper articles about Bobo’s disappearance. Recalling that Bobo had a horse-shoe shaped mark on his rear end from the time when his older brother tried to mark him with a branding iron, Truman checks and discovers the mark. Truman telephones the Shands to let them know Penny is bringing Bobo home to them. The Shands live in a mansion in the Hancock Park area of Los Angeles, California, but the family is not doing well. Bobo’s mother, Margaret, had a mental breakdown following her son’s disappearance and now takes in stray cats and gives her millions to animal shelters. Meanwhile Reggie Shand gambled away his inheritance, while his wife, Rhonda, is an alcoholic. Henry Shand’s will left a third of his estate to Bobo, but included the provision that if Bobo was not found by his thirtieth birthday, that money would go to Reggie. The Shands welcome Bobo home, but are dismayed to see Penny has him on a leash and he walks on all fours. Penny explains he still has wolf-like behavior and does not know how to talk. Penny asks permission to write a book about him, but Reggie refuses and sends her away. In the days that follow, Bobo continues to act like a wolf, chasing after the many cats his mother has in the house and demanding to go outside to urinate. Over the years, Reggie has borrowed considerable money against the inheritance he expected to receive on Bobo’s thirtieth birthday. To ensure that money still comes to him, Reggie takes Bobo into the mountains and abandons him there, but Bobo beats him back home. Later, Reggie unsuccessfully tries to drown Bobo in the bathtub. When Margaret Shand takes Bobo to the country club to show him off, Reggie rushes to stop her as he does not want people to know of Bobo’s return. However, he is too late and everyone at the club is aghast when Bobo crawls on the furniture and chews at their shoes. Lawyer Jack Mollins advises that Reggie only needs to have Bobo sign a power of attorney over to him and the inheritance will still be his. Reggie telephones Penny Grant inviting her to move in and have exclusive rights to Bobo’s story, provided she teaches him how to sign his name. Penny shaves off Bobo’s scraggly beard, trims his hair, and teaches him how to walk on two feet. She also slowly teaches him to use eating utensils and how to talk. Eventually, Penny teaches him how to print his name. Reggie has his lawyer draw up the papers and Bobo is about to sign them when a fire truck with its sirens blaring rushes past the house. Bobo’s wolf instincts kick in and he chases after the truck and rushes into the burning building. Firemen have to rescue him from the building roof and Bobo is so traumatized by the incident that he can no longer hold a pen to print his name. Penny continues teaching Bobo and eventually he is able to print his name again. However, he overhears Rhonda complaining to her husband that she is tired of cleaning up after Bobo and tired of having Penny in the house. Reggie promises that as soon as Bobo signs the papers, he will send Penny away. From then on, Bobo pretends he does not know how to print anymore. Penny takes Bobo to a shopping mall, where he walks out of a toy store with a teddy bear. A little girl sees him with the teddy bear and says she wants one too, but her mother says they cannot afford it. Bobo hears this and gives her the teddy bear. Meanwhile, the store tries to arrest Bobo for shoplifting, but Penny quickly pays for the stuffed bear. When they return to the house, Penny tells Bobo she has learned so much about kindness and being human through Bobo and kisses him. Once she goes inside, Bobo begins jumping up and down, exited by the kiss. He is so ecstatic, he runs through the wet cement in the driveway of their next-door neighbor, Bud Downs, who also threatens to have Bobo arrested. Reggie worries that if his brother is jailed, he will never get the money. However, Rhonda suggests that if Bobo is locked up in mental institution, Reggie could get the money. Reggie and Rhonda throw a dinner party in Bobo’s honor and invite Rhonda’s father, prominent psychiatrist Walter Welmont. As Bobo drinks wine, the alcohol brings out his wolf behavior and soon he is fighting the other guests for food and trying to bite them. At Bobo’s sanity hearing, Welmont testifies that Bobo should be locked away unless he can find a job as a guard dog. The lawyer requests Bobo be committed and Reggie put in charge of his finances. Penny rushes into the courtroom, telling the judge this is a plot to get Bobo’s $30 million inheritance and that she made a mistake by taking Bobo out of the wilderness and hurrying his education. She also admits she loves Bobo. Bobo asks to speak, telling the judge he would be happy to give the money to his family. Reggie is ecstatic, but then Bobo clarifies by saying his “family of wolves.” The judge responds she is not there to rule on what Bobo does with the money, only on his sanity, and rules that he is sane. Bobo rushes out of the courthouse and kisses Penny, promising to be with her forever. But just then a fire truck rushes by with its sirens blaring and he chases after it.

+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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