Back to the Future Part II (1989)

PG | 108 mins | Science fiction, Fantasy | 22 November 1989

Writer:

Bob Gale

Producers:

Bob Gale, Neil Canton

Cinematographer:

Dean Cundey

Production Designer:

Rick Carter

Production Companies:

Universal Pictures , Amblin Entertainment
Full page view
HISTORY

The film ends with a title card that reads “To Be Concluded,” followed by scenes from Back to the Future Part III (1990, see entry), which commenced filming eight days after principal photography was completed on Back to the Future Part II.
       End credits contain the following acknowledgements for excerpts used in the film: “ Smurfs clip provided by Hanna-Barbera Productions, Inc. and Lafig, S. A.; Scenes from Cheers, Family Ties, Taxi, courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation; Prerecorded videotape supplied by CNN, © Cable News Network, Inc. 1989, All Rights Reserved; Scenes from Oprah Winfrey Show, courtesy of King World Productions, Inc.; Scenes from Geraldo Rivera Show, courtesy of Tribune Entertainment Company; Excerpts from Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, courtesy of Pee-Wee Pictures, Inc.; Tape excerpt from Wheel of Fortune, courtesy of Califon Productions, Inc.; Scenes from Miami Vice, Magnum, P.I., courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc.; Scenes from Dallas, courtesy of Warner Bros. Television Distribution; Scenes from A Fistful of Dollars, courtesy of Unidis S.R.L. and United Artists Pictures, Inc.; Additional footage courtesy of Dreamlight Images, Inc., Fish Films, Inc., Wesley Archer, and The Weather Channel.”
       According to production notes found at AMPAS library, Michael J. Fox first learned about a possible sequel to Back to the Future (1985, see entry) when watching the home video version that contained a title card, reading, “To Be Continued”; the title card had not appeared on the original film prints, and Fox immediately contacted his agent, excited to reunite with director Robert Zemeckis ... More Less

The film ends with a title card that reads “To Be Concluded,” followed by scenes from Back to the Future Part III (1990, see entry), which commenced filming eight days after principal photography was completed on Back to the Future Part II.
       End credits contain the following acknowledgements for excerpts used in the film: “ Smurfs clip provided by Hanna-Barbera Productions, Inc. and Lafig, S. A.; Scenes from Cheers, Family Ties, Taxi, courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation; Prerecorded videotape supplied by CNN, © Cable News Network, Inc. 1989, All Rights Reserved; Scenes from Oprah Winfrey Show, courtesy of King World Productions, Inc.; Scenes from Geraldo Rivera Show, courtesy of Tribune Entertainment Company; Excerpts from Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, courtesy of Pee-Wee Pictures, Inc.; Tape excerpt from Wheel of Fortune, courtesy of Califon Productions, Inc.; Scenes from Miami Vice, Magnum, P.I., courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc.; Scenes from Dallas, courtesy of Warner Bros. Television Distribution; Scenes from A Fistful of Dollars, courtesy of Unidis S.R.L. and United Artists Pictures, Inc.; Additional footage courtesy of Dreamlight Images, Inc., Fish Films, Inc., Wesley Archer, and The Weather Channel.”
       According to production notes found at AMPAS library, Michael J. Fox first learned about a possible sequel to Back to the Future (1985, see entry) when watching the home video version that contained a title card, reading, “To Be Continued”; the title card had not appeared on the original film prints, and Fox immediately contacted his agent, excited to reunite with director Robert Zemeckis and his fellow cast members. Writer Bob Gale stated that the final scene in Back to the Future in which “Dr. ‘Doc’ Emmett Brown,” “Marty McFly,” and Marty’s girlfriend “Jennifer” board the time machine for a trip into the future was “simply a joke,” explaining that neither he nor Zemeckis were envisioning a sequel at the time. According to a 20 Nov 1989 LAT article, when Universal Pictures first approached Zemeckis to make a sequel, the director was not sure of his interest; however, he agreed to direct the film after it became apparent that Universal planned to produce it with or without him. With plans for Back to the Future Part II underway, filmmakers retrieved costumes and props from Back to the Future and secured locations that were used in the original film, including Whittier High School in Whittier, CA, and the First United Methodist Church in Hollywood, CA.
       As stated in production notes, Zemeckis approached Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) to modify the “computer-operated camera” he had used in scenes between live actors and animated characters on Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (1988, see entry); for Back to the Future Part II, Zemeckis wanted the camera system to be more mobile and fluid, so ILM provided him with the newly designed VistaGlide system.
       The 20 Nov 1989 LAT article reported that the budgets for both Back to the Future Part II and Back to the Future Part III amounted to $80 million, with the filmmakers allegedly saving $10-15 million by shooting the two films back-to-back. Gale also pointed out that Fox played a high-school-aged character in both sequels, so they needed to complete production on the trilogy sooner than later. For six weeks of production, Fox filmed nights on Back to the Future Part II while taping the final season of the television series Family Ties (NBC, 22 Sep 1982--17 Sep 1989) during the day.
       A 25 May 1990 HR item described the grueling production schedule on Back to the Future Part II and Back to the Future Part III. The third and final film in the trilogy began production only eight days after principal photography on the second had ended. A limited amount of scenes from Back to the Future Part III were shot during principal photography on Back to the Future Part II, as stated in Martin A. Grove’s 20 Apr 1990 HR “Hollywood Report” column. On Back to the Future Part III, Zemeckis worked eighteen-hour days as he was simultaneously shooting the third while editing the second. According to production notes, actor Thomas F. Wilson had a particularly demanding schedule on Back to the Future Part II, reporting to set at 3:00am for makeup on the days he had to play “old Biff” as well as “young Biff” or Biff’s grandson “Griff.”
       Editing took place in a trailer on the set of Back to the Future Part III, as well as at a facility near the set in Sonora, CA, and in Burbank, CA, as stated in the 25 May 1990 HR.
       A 19 Jun 1989 People item pointed out that a theater marquee seen in the film’s 2015 version of downtown Hill Valley advertises an upcoming film, Jaws 19, directed by Max Spielberg; Max is the name of executive producer and Jaws director Steven Spielberg’s son.
       As stated in a 9 Jan 1991 DV article, Crispin Glover, who played “George McFly” in Back to the Future, did not reprise his role in the sequel after squabbling with the producers over salary. In turn, the filmmakers used existing footage of Glover from the original film, in addition to hiring Jeffrey Weissman, an actor and skilled impersonator, applying prosthetics to his face so he would look like Glover. A 21 Nov 1989 DV news brief stated that Glover had seen Back to the Future II and had not registered any complaints about his portrayal in the film, with his representative adding that Glover’s refusal to reprise his role had been “amicable”; however, the actor later sued Universal Studios, Amblin Entertainment, and U-Drive Productions for $1 million, accusing them of using his likeness and voice, and received an undisclosed settlement from Universal City Studios, Inc., as reported in a 2 Jul 1991 HR news item.
       According to a 7 Dec 1989 LAT brief, toy versions of the DeLorean, the vehicle used for Doc’s time machine, were sold at over 400 Toys R Us stores in conjunction with the film’s release, and John DeLorean, the creator of the vehicle, was set to receive five percent of the profits from toy sales. Also to promote Back to the Future Part II, a 12 Nov 1989 LAT news item noted that three billboards with “giant digital clocks counting back the hours” until the film’s opening had been erected, two in Los Angeles, CA, and one in New York City’s Times Square. Other promotions included: “futuristic sunglasses” offered alongside certain menu items at Pizza Hut; a “Back to the Future” fan club that charged a $9.95 membership fee; and a novelization available in bookstores as of Oct 1989.
       Critical reception was mixed. In her 22 Nov 1989 LAT review, Sheila Benson, who had panned the first film, described the sequel as a “pleasant surprise” but criticized the preview scenes from Back to the Future Part III that appear at the end of the film, deeming them a “shockingly tacky coda.” Both the 21 Nov 1989 HR and 22 Nov 1989 Var reviews noted that the sequel lacked the warmth of the original, and Var accused Dean Cundey’s cinematography of being “a generally unattractive set of images.” In a 3 Oct 1997 Screen International item, Zemeckis was quoted as saying that Back to the Future Part II was “a completely misunderstood film,” calling it “the closest I ever made to a Godard film.”
       The film received an Academy Award nomination for Visual Effects.
       According to a 24 Nov 1989 LAT news brief, Back to the Future Part II took in $7 million in box-office receipts on its opening day, marking “the biggest Wednesday [opening] in the history of the motion picture business.” On 9 Jan 1990, HR announced that the film’s worldwide box-office gross had exceeded $200 million, with domestic box-office earnings reported as $116.4 million by a 30 May 1990 LAT article.
       An 11 Sep 2011 LAT article announced that the Nike Mag, a shoe worn by Marty McFly in the year 2015, was unveiled on 8 Sep 2011 in Los Angeles, CA. Fifteen hundred pairs of the shoes were set to be auctioned on Ebay, with proceeds going toward the Michael J. Fox Foundation, dedicated to Parkinson’s disease research, and the first pair sold for $37,500 to Tinie Tempah, a rap music star, according to a 26 Sep 2011 Time brief.
       Back to the Future Part II was re-released along with Back to the Future and Back to the Future Part III on 24 May 1990, one day before the wide release of Back to the Future Part III, as stated in the 9 May 1990 HR news item. Tickets for the triple feature were set at the regular admission price for one film.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Jan 1991.
---
Daily Variety
21 Nov 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Nov 1989
p. 4, 87.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 1990
p. 62, 64.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 1991
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
12 Nov 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Nov 1989
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
22 Nov 1989
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
24 Nov 1989
Section F, p. 2, 31-32.
Los Angeles Times
7 Dec 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 May 1990
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
11 Sep 2011
p. 3.
New York Times
22 Nov 1989
p. 9.
People
19 Jun 1989.
---
Screen International
3 Oct 1997.
---
Time
26 Sep 2011.
---
Variety
22 Nov 1989
pp. 19-20.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Featuring
2015 Video waiters:
2015 Griff gang:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Steven Spielberg Presents
A Robert Zemeckis Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Scr
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam loader
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Addl cam asst
Addl cam asst
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Universal best boy
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Key rigging grip
Rigging crew
Rigging crew
Rigging crew
Video eng
Video playback des supv
Video consultant
Video playback eff
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Best boy, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Best boy grip, 2d unit
Dolly grip, 2d unit
Dir of photog, Addl photog
Cam op, Addl photog
Gaffer, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Prod illustrator
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set des
Set des
Set des
Set des
Set des
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Paint foreman
Plaster foreman
Greensman
Greensman
Stand by painter
Prop master, 2d unit
Greensman, 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's cost supv
Women's cost supv
Cost
Const constructed by
Cost constructed by
Const constructed by
MUSIC
Mus scoring mixer
Audio programmer
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Processed eff
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley rec
ADR supv
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Prop shop/Model supv
Eff shop
Eff shop
Eff shop
Eff shop
Video waiters
Spec eff, 2d unit
Spec eff, 2d unit
Spec eff, 2d unit
Spec eff, 2d unit
Spec visual eff produced at
Assoc visual eff supv, ILM
Visual eff prod, ILM
Visual eff art dir, ILM
Supv model maker, ILM
Opt photog supv, ILM
Opt photog supv, ILM
Anim supv, ILM
Visual eff ed, ILM
Visual eff ed, ILM
VistaGlide eng, ILM
VistaGlide op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Cam op, ILM
Supv stage tech, ILM
Gen mgr, ILM
Exec in charge of post-prod, ILM
Visual eff coord, ILM
Visual eff coord, ILM
Visual eff coord, ILM
Visual eff coord, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Modelmaker, ILM
Model mechanical des, ILM
Model mechanical des, ILM
Model mechanical des, ILM
Model mechanical des, ILM
Model mechanical des, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt cam op, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt line-up, ILM
Opt processing, ILM
Opt processing, ILM
Eff cam supv, ILM
Eff cam op, ILM
Eff cam op, ILM
Eff cam op, ILM
Eff cam op, ILM
Eff cam op, ILM
Eff cam op, ILM
Rotoscope supv, ILM
Rotoscopers, ILM
Rotoscopers, ILM
Rotoscopers, ILM
Rotoscopers, ILM
Rotoscopers, ILM
Rotoscopers, ILM
Rotoscopers, ILM
Rotoscopers, ILM
Animator, ILM
Animator, ILM
Animator, ILM
Asst eff ed, ILM
Asst eff ed, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Cam asst, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Stage tech, ILM
Pyro tech, ILM
Pyro tech, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
VistaGlide system, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Computer graphics, ILM
Matte photog, ILM
Matte photog, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Matte artist, ILM
Negative cutter, ILM
Negative cutter, ILM
Negative cutter, ILM
Opt coord, ILM
Anim coord, ILM
Ed coord, ILM
Prod asst, ILM
Prod asst, ILM
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Make-up created by
Make-up applied by
Make-up applied by
Michael J. Fox's make-up
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Loc mgr
Supv prod accountant
Scr continuity
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Const accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
DGA trainee
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Product res coord
Craft service
Catering
Post-prod supv
Asst to Mr. Zemeckis
Asst to Mr. Gale
Asst to Mr. Canton
Asst to Mr. Starkey
Asst to Mr. Marshall
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation picture car capt
Mechanic
Animal trainer
Einstein's trainer
Future consultant
Future consultant
Future consultant
Future consultant
Future consultant
Future consultant
Future consultant
Future consultant
Scr supv, 2d unit
Prod asst, 2d unit
Craft service, 2d unit
Catering, 2d unit
Transportation capt, 2d unit
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale.
SONGS
"Beat It," written and performed by Michael Jackson, courtesy of CBS Records, Music Licensing Department
"I Can't Drive 55," written and performed by Sammy Hagar, courtesy of Geffen Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Mr. Sandman," written by Pat Ballard, performed by The Four Aces, courtesy of MCA Records
+
SONGS
"Beat It," written and performed by Michael Jackson, courtesy of CBS Records, Music Licensing Department
"I Can't Drive 55," written and performed by Sammy Hagar, courtesy of Geffen Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Mr. Sandman," written by Pat Ballard, performed by The Four Aces, courtesy of MCA Records
"Papa Loves Mambo," written by Al Hoffman, Dick Manning and Bix Reichner, performed by Perry Como, courtesy of RCA Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 November 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 November 1989
Production Date:
began February 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc., & U-Drive Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
7 February 1990
Copyright Number:
PA451911
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Color by Deluxe®
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
108
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30095
SYNOPSIS

On 26 October 1985, Doctor “Doc” Emmett Brown returns from a trip to the future and commands teenager Marty McFly, and his girlfriend, Jennifer, to get into his time machine, warning that Marty and Jennifer’s future children are in danger. The three take off and arrive in the year 2015. Doc uses an “alpha rhythm generator” to put Jennifer to sleep, telling Marty that he is protecting her from learning too much about the future. Marty gawks at hovercrafts flying past as Doc lands in Hill Valley, Marty’s hometown. Getting out of the time machine, Doc instructs Marty to change into a set of clothes that matches the wardrobe of Marty’s future son, Marty Junior. Doc then tells Marty to go to Café 80s around the corner and pose as Marty Junior while Doc detains the real Marty Junior, saying that someone named Griff is due to arrive there and ask Marty Junior if he is “in or out.” Marty must respond that he is “out” in order to save Marty Junior from being arrested and sentenced to fifteen years in prison, thus initiating a string of unfortunate events that will negatively impact Marty and Jennifer’s family. To prove that the matter is urgent, Doc shows Marty a newspaper headline from the next day announcing Marty Junior’s arrest. Doc pulls Jennifer, who is still asleep, out of the time machine, lays her on a pile of boxes, and rushes to intercept Marty Junior. Meanwhile, disguised as his own son, Marty walks into Café 80s and Griff soon appears, demanding that his grandfather, Biff Tannen, apply another coat of wax to his hovercraft. Despite Doc’s efforts to detain him, Marty ... +


On 26 October 1985, Doctor “Doc” Emmett Brown returns from a trip to the future and commands teenager Marty McFly, and his girlfriend, Jennifer, to get into his time machine, warning that Marty and Jennifer’s future children are in danger. The three take off and arrive in the year 2015. Doc uses an “alpha rhythm generator” to put Jennifer to sleep, telling Marty that he is protecting her from learning too much about the future. Marty gawks at hovercrafts flying past as Doc lands in Hill Valley, Marty’s hometown. Getting out of the time machine, Doc instructs Marty to change into a set of clothes that matches the wardrobe of Marty’s future son, Marty Junior. Doc then tells Marty to go to Café 80s around the corner and pose as Marty Junior while Doc detains the real Marty Junior, saying that someone named Griff is due to arrive there and ask Marty Junior if he is “in or out.” Marty must respond that he is “out” in order to save Marty Junior from being arrested and sentenced to fifteen years in prison, thus initiating a string of unfortunate events that will negatively impact Marty and Jennifer’s family. To prove that the matter is urgent, Doc shows Marty a newspaper headline from the next day announcing Marty Junior’s arrest. Doc pulls Jennifer, who is still asleep, out of the time machine, lays her on a pile of boxes, and rushes to intercept Marty Junior. Meanwhile, disguised as his own son, Marty walks into Café 80s and Griff soon appears, demanding that his grandfather, Biff Tannen, apply another coat of wax to his hovercraft. Despite Doc’s efforts to detain him, Marty Junior also arrives at the café, causing Marty to panic and hide. Griff asks Marty Junior if he is “in or out” for that night, and after being thrown behind the counter, Marty Junior says he’s in and passes out. Marty steals Marty Junior’s baseball cap and pops up from behind the counter, telling Griff he is out. A fight ensues, and Griff chases Marty outside. Marty steals a child’s hoverboard, a skateboard that flies, and leads Griff’s gang on a chase. Although Marty’s hoverboard becomes disabled by water when he flies over a lake, Marty dips into the water as Griff’s gang approaches, sending Griff through the window of the courthouse. On his way to meet Doc, Marty buys a sports almanac that covers the years 1950-2000, planning to make money back in 1985 by betting on the winners named in the book. When he and Doc reunite, Marty notices Doc’s newspaper has changed: a headline about Griff’s hoverboard accident has replaced the story about Marty Junior’s arrest. Rejoicing, Doc says they must retrieve Jennifer and return to 1985; however, discovering Marty’s sports almanac, Doc insists that the time machine must not be used for financial gain and throws the book away. Around the corner, Doc and Marty see Jennifer, still unconscious, being arrested by two police officers. Concerned that the police will take her back to the McFly home in Hilldale, Doc says they must keep Jennifer from meeting her future self or the space-time continuum could be forever disrupted. After eavesdropping on the conversation and learning about Doc’s time machine, Biff steals the sports almanac from the trash and follows Doc and Marty in a taxi. Arriving in Hilldale, Doc orders Marty to stay by the vehicle as he walks to the McFly home. Meanwhile, Jennifer wakes up in the McFly home and hides when she hears the voice of her future daughter, Marlene McFly. Marty’s parents, Lorraine and George, arrive, and Marlene tells them that the television is no longer working because Marty had a fight with a repairman who called him a “chicken.” Lorraine says that Marty despises being called a chicken, recalling the time when Marty got into a car accident in an attempt to prove he wasn’t cowardly. Lorraine explains that Marty gave up the guitar after the accident and became depressed. Escaping the house, Jennifer spots future Marty, now weary and middle-aged, and faints as she runs into future Jennifer at the door. Marty runs to the house to help Doc sneak Jennifer’s body away; meanwhile, Biff steals the time machine, travels back in time, and returns moments before Doc and Marty drag Jennifer back to the vehicle. Arriving back in 1985, Doc says he plans to destroy the time machine because time travel has become too dangerous, although he fantasizes about taking one last trip, to the Old West. Doc and Marty leave Jennifer on a porch swing outside her house, and Doc promises that when she wakes up she will believe their journey to 2015 was a dream. Parting ways with Doc, Marty returns home but discovers that another family is living in his house. Noticing that the neighborhood is now crime-ridden, Marty identifies himself to a neighbor, Mr. Strickland, but Strickland does not recognize him. In town, Marty discovers a casino called Biff Tannen’s Pleasure Paradise, and, at the Biff Tannen Museum, Marty watches a video, learning that Biff made a fortune betting on sporting events and now owns a massive corporate empire called BiffCo. Marty also discovers that Biff married his mother, identified in the video as Lorraine Baines McFly, in 1973. Several guards apprehend Marty and knock him out. Waking up, Marty finds his mother, Lorraine, tending to him in a darkened apartment. Biff, Marty’s stepfather, arrives, yelling that Marty should be away at boarding school. Biff hits Lorraine and Marty tries unsuccessfully to defend her. After Biff leaves, Marty learns that his father George died twelve years ago. At the cemetery where George is buried, Doc and Marty reunite, and Doc says that, according to old newspapers, George was assassinated. Doc produces Biff’s cane and the receipt for the sports almanac that Biff left behind in Doc’s time machine, proving that Biff stole Doc’s invention, traveled back in time, and gave the almanac to younger Biff. Later that night, Marty finds Biff in a hot tub with two women and tells him they need to discuss the sports almanac he used to create his fortune. Biff explains to Marty that he received the almanac on November 12, 1955, from an old man who swore him to secrecy. Biff aims a gun at Marty, but before he can shoot, Marty escapes in the time machine with Doc. They head back to November 12, 1955; Doc tells Marty that there are now two versions of Doc and two versions of Marty in 1955, and they must not run into their other selves. Doc and Marty split up, communicating through walkie-talkies as Marty spies on young Biff. After old Biff gives his younger self the almanac and leaves in the time machine, Marty sets out to steal the book. That night, Marty hides in Biff’s backseat as he drives to the “Enchantment Under the Sea” dance. In the parking lot outside the dance, Biff gets knocked out by Marty’s father, George, and, after George has gone, Marty steals the almanac. Although Marty escapes several of Biff’s thugs, he realizes they are also pursuing the other version of Marty who is playing guitar at the dance. Marty climbs atop a lighting fixture and drops a bundle of sandbags onto Biff’s gang, saving the other Marty. Heading to the roof where he plans to meet Doc in the time machine, Marty is stopped by Biff, who calls him a chicken, steals the almanac, and drives away. After boarding Doc’s time machine, Marty grabs his hoverboard and rides alongside Biff’s car as he speeds down the road. Biff drives into a tunnel, trying to run Marty into the concrete wall, but Marty steals the almanac and grabs onto a rope Doc has lowered as they emerge from the tunnel. Biff runs into a manure truck, and, soon after, Doc lowers Marty to the ground, ordering him to burn the almanac. As the book catches fire, Marty notices the words on his matchbook changing from Biff’s Pleasure Palace to Biff’s Auto Detailing. In addition, the newspaper Doc found in 2015 no longer announces George’s death. As Marty prepares to board the time machine, lightning strikes and Doc disappears, leaving Marty behind in 1955. Soon after, a Western Union messenger appears with a letter for Marty. He says that Western Union has had the letter in its possession for the past seventy years with instructions to deliver it to Marty at very location. The letter is from Doc, who is now living in the year 1885. Excited to learn that Doc is still alive, Marty runs to meet the younger version of Doc who is at the Hill Valley clock tower. As the other version of Marty heads away in the time machine, Marty greets younger Doc, announcing that he’s back from the future.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.