The Man Who Loved Women (1983)

R | 111 mins | Comedy-drama | 16 December 1983

Full page view
HISTORY

End credits conclude with the following statements: "Filmed at The Malibu Museum, Malibu, California"; "Some of the artwork in this film was provided by the Feingarten Gallery and the Janus Gallery"; "The producers wish to thank the cities of Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, New York and Houston, and the Texas Film Commission for their assistance in the making of this film."
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filmmaker Blake Edwards viewed the 1977 French production, L’Homme Qui Aimait les Femmes, and was convinced it would make an excellent American comedy. Collaborating with his son, Geoffrey, Edwards completed the screenplay in Oct 1982. Actor Burt Reynolds, a close friend of Edwards and producer Tony Adams, was considered for the title role, but was unavailable because of a prior commitment. The 27 Sep 1982 HR announced actor Warren Beatty as Edwards’ choice for the role, but he was replaced by Reynolds, who became available when his other project went on hiatus. Actor Dustin Hoffman was also a candidate, as evidenced by the 7 Mar 1983 New York. Angered over losing the part, Hoffman became verbally abusive during a meeting with Edwards and accused him of stealing an idea the actor had suggested for the screenplay. While Bert Fields, Hoffman’s attorney, denied allegations of abusive language, Tony Adams described the actor as “a spoiled brat,” and dismissed Hoffman’s contributions as unnecessary.
       The 18 Jan 1983 Var reported that Adams was producing a celebrity fashion show on 11 Feb 1983 in Los Angeles, CA, to be chaired by Edwards’ wife and Reynolds’ ... More Less

End credits conclude with the following statements: "Filmed at The Malibu Museum, Malibu, California"; "Some of the artwork in this film was provided by the Feingarten Gallery and the Janus Gallery"; "The producers wish to thank the cities of Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, New York and Houston, and the Texas Film Commission for their assistance in the making of this film."
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filmmaker Blake Edwards viewed the 1977 French production, L’Homme Qui Aimait les Femmes, and was convinced it would make an excellent American comedy. Collaborating with his son, Geoffrey, Edwards completed the screenplay in Oct 1982. Actor Burt Reynolds, a close friend of Edwards and producer Tony Adams, was considered for the title role, but was unavailable because of a prior commitment. The 27 Sep 1982 HR announced actor Warren Beatty as Edwards’ choice for the role, but he was replaced by Reynolds, who became available when his other project went on hiatus. Actor Dustin Hoffman was also a candidate, as evidenced by the 7 Mar 1983 New York. Angered over losing the part, Hoffman became verbally abusive during a meeting with Edwards and accused him of stealing an idea the actor had suggested for the screenplay. While Bert Fields, Hoffman’s attorney, denied allegations of abusive language, Tony Adams described the actor as “a spoiled brat,” and dismissed Hoffman’s contributions as unnecessary.
       The 18 Jan 1983 Var reported that Adams was producing a celebrity fashion show on 11 Feb 1983 in Los Angeles, CA, to be chaired by Edwards’ wife and Reynolds’ costar, Julie Andrews. Proceeds benefited the “Operation California” Southeast Asia assistance program. Prizes included a small role in The Man Who Loved Women. A news item in the 24 Jan 1983 DV reported that Edwards was headquartered at the Twentieth Century-Fox studio, even though the film was to be released by Columbia Pictures Corp. The 24 Mar 1983 DV identified Ellen Bauer, who made her screen debut in the role of “Svetlana,” as the Los Angeles Ballet Company’s prima ballerina.
       As stated in the 4 Feb 1983 HR, principal photography began 28 Feb 1983 in Houston, TX, followed by additional photography in Los Angeles. Production notes cite the Houston Astrodome as a filming location.
       An advertisement in the 23 Feb 1983 HR heralded a contest to be held the following day, in which Edwards would select “the woman with the most beautiful legs in the world” for a featured role in the picture. Contestants were required to appear bare-legged at the Burbank Studios in Burbank, CA, at ten o’clock in the morning. All ages were welcomed.
       The filming of a scene at a Santa Monica, CA, gasoline station, featuring Reynolds and costar Marilu Henner, drew a large crowd of spectators, according to the 9 Mar 1983 Var. Reportedly, some members of the crowd assumed the station was involved in a price war with its competitors. The completion of principal photography on 20 May 1983 was announced in the 2 Jun 1983 DV.
       A news item in the 24 Sep 1983 LAHExam reported that Columbia Pictures had to recall 1,000 advertising posters because they depicted Reynolds holding a rose, supposedly a symbol of monogamous love. Following the recall, new posters were issued featuring Reynolds posing with a daisy, considered a more “capricious” flower.
       The 19 Oct 1983 Var announced that singer Rita Coolidge would perform the theme song, “Little Boys.” Two days later, on 21 Oct 1983, HR noted that singer Helen Reddy’s version would be used in the film.
       According to the 18 Nov 1983 LAT, Columbia executives judged the final scene to be “bleak,” and ordered a new ending for the $12 million production, one month prior to its release. Tony Adams asserted that Edwards conceived the revision on his own without any coercion by studio executives. The new ending was completed in two days, with a running time of two to three minutes. Although Reynolds did not appear in the scene, several of his costars were featured, including Andrews, Henner, Cynthia Sikes, and Kim Basinger. Photography began 17 Nov 1983. Weeks later, the 14 Dec 1983 LAT reported that the new ending had been discarded in favor of the original, based on audience reaction to a 3 Dec 1983 test screening. While the new ending, in which Reynolds’ character was “laid to rest after one too many amorous adventures,” was well received during a series of late Nov 1983 test screenings, the majority of audience members preferred the original. Columbia Pictures president Guy McElwaine was reportedly “baffled.” The 12 Dec 1983 DV estimated the cost of the additional scene at $300,000.
       As part of the film’s promotional campaign, Columbia advertised a telephone number at which callers would hear a special prerecorded message from Reynolds on 17 Dec 1983, as reported in the 20 Nov 1983 LAHExam . Each call would cost fifty cents, and the actor would be on hand to speak to a few random callers. On 21 Dec 1983, Var stated that an upcoming thirty-minute special, Blake Edwards: The Man Who Loves Comedy, would air on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS), produced by John Simmons and Igor Oganesoff. An invitational preview screening of The Man Who Loved Women was held at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater at AMPAS headquarters, hosted by Edwards and Columbia Pictures. No date was specified. The 9 Dec 1983 Miami Herald announced the film’s gala premiere in Miami, FL, on 11 Dec 1983. Attending the red-carpet event were Edwards, cast members Reynolds, Andrews, Henner, Sikes, and Jennifer Edwards, along with actors Candice Bergen, Charles Durning, Ernest Borgnine, Dom DeLuise, and Robert Urich, and singers David Bowie and Julio Iglesias. Tickets for the screening and a champagne reception sold for $35. A limited number of tickets, which entitled the holder to a cocktail party and dinner at Miami’s Four Ambassadors Hotel, were priced at $150. The event was preceded by a “street party,” featuring Mummers and a Dixieland band.
       Reviews were lukewarm to negative. While the 16 Dec 1983 NYT described it as a somewhat enjoyable comedy with excellent performances by Reynolds, Andrews, and Basinger, the 14 Dec 1983 Var called it “truly woeful.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Dec 1982.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jan 1983.
---
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1983.
---
Daily Variety
9 Mar 1983.
---
Daily Variety
24 Mar 1983.
---
Daily Variety
2 Jun 1983.
---
Daily Variety
12 Dec 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Sep 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Oct 1983.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 1983.
---
LAHExam
24 Feb 1983.
---
LAHExam
24 Sep 1983.
---
LAHExam
20 Nov 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Nov 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
14 Dec 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Dec 1983
p. 1.
Miami Herald
9 Dec 1983.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Mar 1983.
---
New York
7 Mar 1983.
---
New York Times
16 Dec 1983
p. 8.
Variety
18 Jan 1983.
---
Variety
23 Feb 1983.
---
Variety
19 Oct 1983.
---
Variety
14 Dec 1983
p. 17.
Variety
21 Dec 1983.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Blake Edwards Film
From Columbia-Delphi Productions
from B.E.E.
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Key grip
Grip best boy
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Grip
Gaffer
Best boy
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Stills photog
Video asst
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop
Const coord
Propmaker foreman
Labor foreman
Paint foreman
Leadman
2d lead man
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Mr. Reynolds' ward by
Asst cost des
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles by
DANCE
"Swan Lake" performed by the
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hair des
Miss Andrews' makeup by
Makeup artist
Body makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod assoc
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Prod coord
Asst to Mr. Edwards
Asst to Mr. Adams
Office asst
Office asst
Loc asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Craft service
Sculpture consultant
Gallery advisor
Gallery advisor
Dir of pub
Promotional tie-ins provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the French film and orignal screenplay L'homme qui aimait les femmes by François Truffaut, Michel Fermaud and Suzanne Schiffman (Les Film du Carrosse and Les Productions Artistes Associés, 1977).
SONGS
Theme song "Little Boys," music by Henry Mancini, lyrics by Alan & Marilyn Bergman, performed by Helen Reddy.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 December 1983
Premiere Information:
Miami, FL, premiere: 11 December 1983
Los Angeles and New York openings: 16 December 1983
Production Date:
28 February--20 May 1983 in Houston, TX, and Southern CA
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 January 1984
Copyright Number:
PA197885
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
111
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Dozens of women attend the funeral of sculptor David Fowler in Los Angeles, CA. Marianna Solari, his former psychoanalyst, remembers David as an intelligent, kind man who loved, and was loved by, women. When David first came to Marianna as a patient, he suffered from an inability to make decisions of any kind, as well as anxiety and depression, which blocked his creative impulses. In their first session, David tells Marianna about the most beautiful pair of female legs he has ever seen. Unable to see the woman’s face, he follows her into a busy street and falls into the back of a pickup truck, but memorizes her license plate number as she drives away. Obsessed with her legs, David traces the license number to insurance agent Agnes Chapman and telephones her to arrange a meeting. Agnes is intrigued and accepts the invitation. During their meeting, Agnes reveals that the woman David seeks is actually her cousin, Cynthia, a dancer from Canada, to whom Agnes loaned the car. David believes Agnes is lying and follows her to an aerobics class the next morning, but is disappointed upon seeing her in sweatpants. Desperate to see Agnes’s legs, David shatters a taillight on her car and leaves a note with his address. After they make love, Agnes leaves for a dinner date with her boyfriend, and informs David that Cynthia will return to Los Angeles on December 21st. During a session with Marianna, David recalls the joy of losing his virginity at age sixteen to a young prostitute named Darla. He was raised by a single mother, whose reputation ... +


Dozens of women attend the funeral of sculptor David Fowler in Los Angeles, CA. Marianna Solari, his former psychoanalyst, remembers David as an intelligent, kind man who loved, and was loved by, women. When David first came to Marianna as a patient, he suffered from an inability to make decisions of any kind, as well as anxiety and depression, which blocked his creative impulses. In their first session, David tells Marianna about the most beautiful pair of female legs he has ever seen. Unable to see the woman’s face, he follows her into a busy street and falls into the back of a pickup truck, but memorizes her license plate number as she drives away. Obsessed with her legs, David traces the license number to insurance agent Agnes Chapman and telephones her to arrange a meeting. Agnes is intrigued and accepts the invitation. During their meeting, Agnes reveals that the woman David seeks is actually her cousin, Cynthia, a dancer from Canada, to whom Agnes loaned the car. David believes Agnes is lying and follows her to an aerobics class the next morning, but is disappointed upon seeing her in sweatpants. Desperate to see Agnes’s legs, David shatters a taillight on her car and leaves a note with his address. After they make love, Agnes leaves for a dinner date with her boyfriend, and informs David that Cynthia will return to Los Angeles on December 21st. During a session with Marianna, David recalls the joy of losing his virginity at age sixteen to a young prostitute named Darla. He was raised by a single mother, whose reputation was compromised by her numerous male suitors. David always defended and forgave his mother, and extended this practice to all women when he reached adulthood. David found his assistant, Nancy, a former prostitute, walking the streets on a rainy night and invited her to stay at his home. Despite their mutual attraction, David demonstrated his respect for Nancy by refusing to make love to her, although a sexual relationship developed later. While attending the unveiling of one of his works in Houston, Texas, David meets millionaire Roy Carr, who commissioned the sculpture, at the urging of his wife, Louise, an admirer of David’s art. Louise seizes every opportunity to make love to David, confident that her husband is unaware. She invites David to spend the night in her penthouse, with the assurance that her husband is out of town, but Roy surprises her moments later with a puppy named Simba. While David hides in a closet, Louise convinces Roy to take a shower, giving her lover the opportunity to escape. However, David is hindered when a tube of Crazy Glue adhesive spills on him, bonding one hand to his mouth, the other to Simba, and both feet to the carpet. Louise cuts David’s feet loose and ushers him out the door, offering her car to drive himself to the airport. Upon his return to Los Angeles, David tells Marianna that he regrets his trip to Houston, and has an anxiety attack later that night. In the morning, David is visited by two police detectives, who inform him that Roy learned of the affair through a private investigator, and reacted violently toward Louise. In self-defense, Louise shot one of his testicles with a revolver. David is advised that, as co-respondent in the affair, he may be required to testify at the trial. His next session with Marianna is interrupted by an earthquake, which repositions a mirror in the office, allowing David to see up the analyst’s skirt. He suddenly loses interest in his own troubles and asks Marianna a series of personal questions. She humors him briefly, then insists on resuming the session. David recalls a childhood incident in which he saw his mother naked in the bathtub, and admits to being both embarrassed and aroused. As David experiences an increase in sexual activity, Marianna expresses her disapproval to her own analyst, Simon Abrams, realizing that she is in love with her patient. Simon warns Marianna of an impending ethical dilemma, and advises her to end her professional relationship with David. The budding romance between Marianna and David enables him to overcome his creative block. She greets his initial proposal of marriage with skepticism, but eventually believes him to be sincere. However, within two months he begins an affair with a ballerina named Svetlana. In early December, Marianna telephones David with a referral to another analyst, adding that she will be spending the next three weeks in Zurich, Switzerland. David meets Marianna at the airport and gives her a book of his works, with the inscription, “To my liberator, my lover, my friend.” He telephones her in Zurich, complaining that he is exhausted by the pursuit of women, which he blames on “middle age and poor circulation.” Marianna receives a letter from David on December 21st, in which he promises to resume analysis with a new doctor if she returns to him. Later that day, David is struck by a car while following Agnes’s cousin, Cynthia, across a busy street. At the hospital, Marianna, Louise, Agnes, Nancy, and Svetlana gather in the waiting room, while a nurse assures David of his impending recovery. Aroused by the nurse, David suddenly rises from his bed and is killed as a heart monitor falls on him. At the funeral, Marianna wishes David could see the many women who came to mourn him, and believes she and the others are richer for the experience of having known him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.