George White's Scandals (1934)

80 mins | Musical | 16 March 1934

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HISTORY

This film was reviewed by Var and a pre-release MPH article as Scandals . Although the onscreen credits list only George White as the storywriter and credit only Jack Yellen with additional dialogue, the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library confirm that Siegfried M. Herzig and Samuel Shipman wrote the original screen story, William Conselman wrote the screenplay, Joseph Cunningham wrote the dialogue, and Henry Johnson, Ray Henderson and Irving Caesar contributed to the dialogue. This was Broadway producer White's first film, and it was based on his highly successful series of theatrical musical revues, which began in 1919. The legal records reveal that White was contracted to direct and produce five "Scandals" pictures for Fox over a five-year period, although he only made this film and George White's 1935 Scandals for the studio (see below). A letter in the legal records states that either Fox or White could cancel their contract if, after each film had been in release for four months, it did not appear that the film would accumulate a gross of $1,400,000. White produced George White's Scandals for RKO in 1945. It was directed by Felix E. Feist and starred Joan Davis and Jack Haley.
       A 29 Nov 1933 HR news item reported that Fox was trying to get Raoul Walsh to direct the picture, and the legal records note that White replaced dance director Russell Markert with Georgie Hale before production began. According to HR news items, M-G-M initially refused to loan Jimmy Durante to Fox, although he ... More Less

This film was reviewed by Var and a pre-release MPH article as Scandals . Although the onscreen credits list only George White as the storywriter and credit only Jack Yellen with additional dialogue, the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library confirm that Siegfried M. Herzig and Samuel Shipman wrote the original screen story, William Conselman wrote the screenplay, Joseph Cunningham wrote the dialogue, and Henry Johnson, Ray Henderson and Irving Caesar contributed to the dialogue. This was Broadway producer White's first film, and it was based on his highly successful series of theatrical musical revues, which began in 1919. The legal records reveal that White was contracted to direct and produce five "Scandals" pictures for Fox over a five-year period, although he only made this film and George White's 1935 Scandals for the studio (see below). A letter in the legal records states that either Fox or White could cancel their contract if, after each film had been in release for four months, it did not appear that the film would accumulate a gross of $1,400,000. White produced George White's Scandals for RKO in 1945. It was directed by Felix E. Feist and starred Joan Davis and Jack Haley.
       A 29 Nov 1933 HR news item reported that Fox was trying to get Raoul Walsh to direct the picture, and the legal records note that White replaced dance director Russell Markert with Georgie Hale before production began. According to HR news items, M-G-M initially refused to loan Jimmy Durante to Fox, although he does appear in the completed film, and songwriter Irving Caesar was considered for a "comedy role," although his participation as an actor in the finished picture has not been confirmed. A LAT news item notes that the Loomis Sisters were scheduled to be in the cast, but their participation in the final film has also not been confirmed. According to contemporary sources, Jack Haley and Lilian Harvey were set for leading roles, and Marie Ormiston, who was a member of the Broadway George White's Scandals cast, was also to be in the picture. None of them appear in the finished film. Lilian Harvey was replaced by Alice Faye, who made her screen-acting debut in this picture. Faye had appeared in the eleventh edition of White's Broadway show, which opened in 1931, and soon after became a regular on Rudy Vallee's radio show. Modern sources note that Faye was originally scheduled to sing just one number in the picture, but was given Harvey's part when she left the production before filming began. Several contemporary reviews noted that public curiousity over Faye would bring in audiences. The Var review pointed out: "For box office, Scandals must rest its case on the title, Rudy Vallee's personal draw and probable romantic speculation over, and public interest in, the joint presence of Vallee and Alice Faye." Modern sources note that in Jan 1934, Vallee's wife named Faye as a co-respondent in her divorce suit against Vallee. Shirley Temple, who was a member of The Meglin Kiddies, is included in the number "Following in Mother's Footsteps," which chronicles the future careers of former "Scandal Girls'" daughters.
       According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Hays Office objected to three "gags" contained in the picture: a scene during the "So Nice" song in which "Stew Hart" picks up a toilet seat and tells "Patsy Dey" that she can use it as a frame for a picture of her mother; another scene from "So Nice" in which "Stew" picks up a catalog and states that he is leaving the room; and a sequence in which "Patsy," who is bending over to peer through a keyhole, rejects "Stew's" proposal and tells him to "put that in your pipe and smoke it." In response, "Stew" states: "Well, I guess I'll have to get a bigger pipe." Although the other scenes were left in, the catalog gag was apparently shortened, and the picture received a seal of approval from the Hays Office. After the film was released, however, many state and city censor boards and civic organizations lodged protests against it with the Hays Office and Fox. The three scenes mentioned above were objected to, as were the song "Nasty Man," sung by Faye, and the Meglin Kiddies sequence in which one of the children does a fan dance and sings "Nasty Man." The film was banned by the Legion of Decency and was withdrawn from release by Fox on 15 Feb 1935. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14-Apr-34
---
Daily Variety
20 Jan 34
p. 3.
Daily Variety
24 Feb 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Sep 33
p. 1
Film Daily
17 Mar 34
p. 4.
Hollywood Citizen-News
24-Nov-33
---
Hollywood Citizen-News
6-Dec-33
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 33
p. 4, 21
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 33
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 33
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 33
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 33
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Feb 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 34
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 34
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Feb 34
pp. 1-2.
Los Angeles Times
22-Nov-33
---
Motion Picture Daily
9 Mar 34
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Feb 34
p. 39.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Mar 34
p. 35.
New York Times
16 Mar 34
p. 35.
Variety
20 Mar 34
p. 16.
Variety
27 Mar 34
p. 12.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Tom Jackson
Edwin J. Brady
J. L. Lindsey
Peggy Carroll
Evelyn Eager
Mary Stewart
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Entire production conceived, created and dir by
Story dir by
Mus numbers dir of
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Exec prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Story
Addl dial
Addl dial
Addl dial
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
DANCE
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Nasty Man," "So Nice," "Hold My Hand," "Following in Mother's Footsteps," "My Dog Loves Your Dog," "Six Women," "Sweet and Simple" and "Every Day Is Father's Day with Baby," music by Ray Henderson, lyrics by Jack Yellen and Irving Caesar
"Cabin in the Cotton and the Cotton in the Cabin," words and music by Irving Caesar
"The Man on the Flying Trapeze," words by George Leybourne, music by Gaston Lyle.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Scandals
Release Date:
16 March 1934
Production Date:
18 December 1933--20 January 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 March 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4562
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80
Length(in feet):
7,200
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

While George White sells tickets to his musical revue, George White's Scandals , which is being held at the Apollo Theatre in New York City, Miss Lee, a visiting reporter, points out tobacco tycoon John R. Loraine and his spoiled daughter Barbara. Barbara is notorious for hiring male singers for her father's radio show in order to romance them. She has successfully hooked George's star attraction, Jimmy Martin, who will be making his first appearance on the Loraine Tobacco Hour in a broadcast from the stage that night. Jimmy's longtime partner, Kitty Donnelly, who is in love with Jimmy, is very unhappy with the situation, and she is comforted by her friend and fellow performer, Happy McGillicuddy, who is in love with her. To further complicate the romantic tangles, Happy is pursued by Patsy Dey, who is the beloved of Stew Hart, and in between their numbers, the foursome sigh and squabble over one another. After Kitty confronts Barbara, who is trying to persuade Jimmy to leave the show, she confides to Happy that she herself will leave the show if Jimmy does, which makes Happy threaten to do the same. This starts a chain reaction, and, with all of his stars determined to quit, George tries to find a solution. The show continues while George plots to demonstrate to Jimmy what kind of woman Barbara really is. George asks Stew to pretend to be a former intimate friend of Barbara's, but their ruse does not work and Jimmy decides to quit the show. He is discussing this with George when they see Barbara hugging a former boyfriend, wrestler Pete Pandos. ... +


While George White sells tickets to his musical revue, George White's Scandals , which is being held at the Apollo Theatre in New York City, Miss Lee, a visiting reporter, points out tobacco tycoon John R. Loraine and his spoiled daughter Barbara. Barbara is notorious for hiring male singers for her father's radio show in order to romance them. She has successfully hooked George's star attraction, Jimmy Martin, who will be making his first appearance on the Loraine Tobacco Hour in a broadcast from the stage that night. Jimmy's longtime partner, Kitty Donnelly, who is in love with Jimmy, is very unhappy with the situation, and she is comforted by her friend and fellow performer, Happy McGillicuddy, who is in love with her. To further complicate the romantic tangles, Happy is pursued by Patsy Dey, who is the beloved of Stew Hart, and in between their numbers, the foursome sigh and squabble over one another. After Kitty confronts Barbara, who is trying to persuade Jimmy to leave the show, she confides to Happy that she herself will leave the show if Jimmy does, which makes Happy threaten to do the same. This starts a chain reaction, and, with all of his stars determined to quit, George tries to find a solution. The show continues while George plots to demonstrate to Jimmy what kind of woman Barbara really is. George asks Stew to pretend to be a former intimate friend of Barbara's, but their ruse does not work and Jimmy decides to quit the show. He is discussing this with George when they see Barbara hugging a former boyfriend, wrestler Pete Pandos. Convinced now that Barbara is not the woman for him, Jimmy asks George to help square the situation with Kitty, whom Jimmy now realizes he loves. While George is orchestrating a grand finale for the show and the lovers, Happy finally agrees to marry Patsy. Jimmy and Kitty then begin their number "Sweet and Simple," which includes a pretend wedding ceremony. George has tricked Jimmy and Kitty into signing a marriage license, and, much to everyone's delight, the wedding ceremony is real and the couple is married on stage. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.