She's Out of Control (1989)

PG | 97 mins | Comedy | 14 April 1989

Director:

Stan Dragoti

Producer:

Stephen Simon

Cinematographer:

Donald Peterman

Editor:

Dov Hoenig

Production Designer:

David L. Snyder

Production Company:

Weintraub Entertainment Group
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HISTORY

Referring to the film by its working title, Daddy’s Little Girl, a 17 Nov 1988 HR article stated that producer Stephen Deutsch first saw the script when he was at New Century Productions, but he was unable to convince the company to make the picture. Although Deutsch moved to Universal Pictures a year later, he remained unable to secure backing from studio executives. Around that time, the Weintraub Entertainment Group (WEG) was getting started, and Deutsch gave the script to WEG executives David Kirkpatrick and Michael Roberts. The studio approved the project “within a few days.” Deutsch hired director Stan Dragoti because of his work on Mr. Mom (1983, see entry).
       An 11 May 1988 Var production chart reported that principal photography began on 25 Apr 1988. Filming took place on Stage 12 at the Twentieth Century-Fox backlot in Los Angeles, CA. HR listed a budget of $12 million.
       On 11 Jan 1989, HR announced that Daddy’s Little Girl was originally scheduled for release on 17 Feb 1989, but it was not yet ready for marketing and distribution. By 10 Feb 1989, the title had been changed to She’s Out of Control, as reported in an LAHExam news item published that day, and opened in theaters on 14 Apr 1989. The film was released in Europe as Keep Your Hands Off My Daughter, according to the 20 Jul 1990 DV.
       She’s Out of Control marked the theatrical feature film debut for writers Michael J. Nathanson and Seth Winston. ... More Less

Referring to the film by its working title, Daddy’s Little Girl, a 17 Nov 1988 HR article stated that producer Stephen Deutsch first saw the script when he was at New Century Productions, but he was unable to convince the company to make the picture. Although Deutsch moved to Universal Pictures a year later, he remained unable to secure backing from studio executives. Around that time, the Weintraub Entertainment Group (WEG) was getting started, and Deutsch gave the script to WEG executives David Kirkpatrick and Michael Roberts. The studio approved the project “within a few days.” Deutsch hired director Stan Dragoti because of his work on Mr. Mom (1983, see entry).
       An 11 May 1988 Var production chart reported that principal photography began on 25 Apr 1988. Filming took place on Stage 12 at the Twentieth Century-Fox backlot in Los Angeles, CA. HR listed a budget of $12 million.
       On 11 Jan 1989, HR announced that Daddy’s Little Girl was originally scheduled for release on 17 Feb 1989, but it was not yet ready for marketing and distribution. By 10 Feb 1989, the title had been changed to She’s Out of Control, as reported in an LAHExam news item published that day, and opened in theaters on 14 Apr 1989. The film was released in Europe as Keep Your Hands Off My Daughter, according to the 20 Jul 1990 DV.
       She’s Out of Control marked the theatrical feature film debut for writers Michael J. Nathanson and Seth Winston. It was also the first major role for Ami Dolenz, daughter of musician Mickey Dolenz of the band and television show, The Monkees.

More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Jul 1990.
---
Entertainment Inc.
10 Feb 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 1988.
pp. 18-19.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 1989
p. 1, 45.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 1989
p. 4, 65.
Los Angeles Times
14 Apr 1989
p. 6.
New York Times
14 Apr 1989
p. 13.
Variety
11 May 1988.
---
Variety
19 Apr 1989
p. 24.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
And:
as "Katie"
Matthew L. Perry
as
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Weintraub Entertainment Group presents
A Stephen Deutsch production
A Stan Dragoti film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Film loader
Steadicam op
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Rigging lighting tech
Lighting tech-best boy
Lighting tech-best boy
Key grip
Grip-best boy
Dolly grip
Video assist op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const paint foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Mr. Danza's costumer
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
Women's costumer
MUSIC
Orig score by
Mus supv
Asst mus ed
Orchestrations by
Mus scoring mixer
Mus programmer
Mus clearance
Mus supv for MCA Records
Period source mus research by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom man
Cable person
Rerec by
Rerec by
Rerec by
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Main title logo by
Opticals by
DANCE
Dance seq staged by
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Body makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Greensman
Craft service
Unit pub
Studio teacher
Casting asst
Asst to Mr Dragoti
Asst to Mr. Wilson
Asst to Mr. Deutsch
Asst to Mr. Danza
Mr. Danza's pal
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Asst to Tim Sexton
Caterer
Photo of Wallace Shawn by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“California Dreamin’,” written by John Phillips and Michelle Phillips, performed by Mamas and Papas, courtesy of MCA Records
“You Really Got Me,” written by Ray Davies, performed by The Kinks, courtesy of PRT Records c/o Celebrity Licensing Inc.
“16 Candles,” written by Luther Dixon & Allyson R. Khent, performed by The Crests, courtesy of Post Records c/o/ Original Sound Entertainment
+
SONGS
“California Dreamin’,” written by John Phillips and Michelle Phillips, performed by Mamas and Papas, courtesy of MCA Records
“You Really Got Me,” written by Ray Davies, performed by The Kinks, courtesy of PRT Records c/o Celebrity Licensing Inc.
“16 Candles,” written by Luther Dixon & Allyson R. Khent, performed by The Crests, courtesy of Post Records c/o/ Original Sound Entertainment
“Rock Me,” written by John Kay, performed by David Morgan & Gary Falcone
“Maniac,” written by Michael Sembello & Dennis Matkosky, performed by Michael Sembello, courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation
“Concentration,” written by Phil Thornalley, performed by Phil Thornalley, courtesy of MCA Records
“You Should Be Loving Me,” written by Lotti Golden & Tommy Faragher, performed by Brenda K. Starr, courtesy of MCA Records
“Venus,” written by Ed Marshall, performed by Frankie Avalon, courtesy of Chancellor Records
“Feel The Shake,” written by Mickey Finn & Fernie Rod, performed by JETBOY, courtesy of MCA Records
“Oh Yeah,” written by Boris Blank & Dieter Meier, performed by Yello, courtesy of PolyGram Special Projects, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
“Rocky Mountain Way,” written by Joe Walsh, Joe Vitale, Ken Passarelli, Rocke Grace, performed by Gary Falcone
“Mona,” written by E. McDaniel, performed by Bo Diddley, courtesy of MCA Records
“Angel Baby,” written by Rose Hamlin, performed by Beth Anderson
“Incense & Peppermints,” written by Timothy Gilbert & John Carter, performed by Strawberry Alarm Clock, courtesy of MCA Records
“Baby Please Don’t Go,” written by Joe Williams, performed by David Morgan
“Make Some Noise,” written by Mickey Finn, Fernie Rod, Billy Rowe, Ron Tostenson, Sam Yaffa, performed by JETBOY, courtesy of MCA Records
“Our Day Will Come,” written by Bob Hilliard & Mort Garson, performed by Ruby & the Romantics, courtesy of MCA Records
“Secret Agent Man,” written by P. F. Sloan & Steve Barri, performed by Johnny Rivers, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc., Special Markets Division
“The Loneliest Heart,” written by Michael Jeffries & Jay Logan, performed by Boys Club, courtesy of MCA Records
“Happy To Be Alive,” written by N. Ingman, courtesy of Associated Production Music
“Lover’s Serenade,” written by A. Morehouse, courtesy of Associated Production Music
“Winning Side,” written by Danny Elfman, performed by Oingo Boingo, courtesy of MCA Records
“La Bamba,” written and performed by Richie Valens, courtesy of Delfi Records c/o Original Sound Entertainment
“Hunger Of Love,” written by Harold Faltermeyer & Keith Forsey, performed by Harold Faltermeyer, courtesy of MCA Records
“Where’s The Fire,” written by Mark Keefner, David Green, & David Abravanel, performed by Troy Hinton, courtesy of MCA Records
“Daddy’s Little Girl,” written by Brian Wilson, Alexandra Morgan, Eugene E. Landy, performed by Brian Wilson, courtesy of Sire Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Keep Your Hands Off My Daughter
Release Date:
14 April 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 14 April 1989
Production Date:
began 25 April 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Weintraub Entertainment Group, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 April 1989
Copyright Number:
PA412516
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by The Film House Group
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29571
SYNOPSIS

Radio producer and widower Doug Simpson looks after his two daughters, twelve-year-old Bonnie, and Katie, who is celebrating her fifteenth birthday. Encouraging Katie to broaden her horizons, Doug presents the girl with an airplane ticket for a school trip to Paris, France, but she is socially awkward, and wishes to stay home. Although Katie wears thick-rimmed eyeglasses and braces, she is adored by her nextdoor neighbor, Richard. On the night of her birthday, Katie confesses to her father that she intends to end the romance with Richard. Several days later, Doug returns home from a business trip to find that his girl friend, Janet Pearson, has given Katie a makeover, and the girl has been transformed into a knockout. Doug becomes obsessed with fending off the girl’s new suitors; he neglects his duties at work, and ratings drop at the radio show. Janet convinces Doug to seek treatment from Dr. Herman Fishbinder, but the psychiatrist argues that Doug is not overreacting. He gives Doug a book he wrote about controlling teen behavior, and suggests that Katie should take birth control pills. Although Katie still is a virgin, Doug fails to convince her of the merits of abstinence. Dr. Fishbinder advises Doug to get married, so his daughters will have a strong female role model, and he proposes to Janet. Overjoyed, Janet wants to make love, but Doug complains that women are singularly fixated on sex, and turns her away. In time, Doug befriends Katie’s musician boyfriend, Joey. Still, Katie ends the relationship and tells her father that she is enjoying her newfound popularity. Richard, the boy next door, ... +


Radio producer and widower Doug Simpson looks after his two daughters, twelve-year-old Bonnie, and Katie, who is celebrating her fifteenth birthday. Encouraging Katie to broaden her horizons, Doug presents the girl with an airplane ticket for a school trip to Paris, France, but she is socially awkward, and wishes to stay home. Although Katie wears thick-rimmed eyeglasses and braces, she is adored by her nextdoor neighbor, Richard. On the night of her birthday, Katie confesses to her father that she intends to end the romance with Richard. Several days later, Doug returns home from a business trip to find that his girl friend, Janet Pearson, has given Katie a makeover, and the girl has been transformed into a knockout. Doug becomes obsessed with fending off the girl’s new suitors; he neglects his duties at work, and ratings drop at the radio show. Janet convinces Doug to seek treatment from Dr. Herman Fishbinder, but the psychiatrist argues that Doug is not overreacting. He gives Doug a book he wrote about controlling teen behavior, and suggests that Katie should take birth control pills. Although Katie still is a virgin, Doug fails to convince her of the merits of abstinence. Dr. Fishbinder advises Doug to get married, so his daughters will have a strong female role model, and he proposes to Janet. Overjoyed, Janet wants to make love, but Doug complains that women are singularly fixated on sex, and turns her away. In time, Doug befriends Katie’s musician boyfriend, Joey. Still, Katie ends the relationship and tells her father that she is enjoying her newfound popularity. Richard, the boy next door, tries to win back Katie’s heart, but she starts to date a wealthy senior named Timothy. Remembering Dr. Fishbinder’s book, Doug suspects the young man is “too perfect” and spies on his affairs. The obsession causes his radio show to suffer further, and ratings continue to decline. Doug forbids Katie from going to the prom with Timothy, but Janet appeals to her fiancé, and he capitulates. However, he learns from Dr. Fishbinder that most girls lose their virginity on prom night, and makes a dinner reservation at the same hotel so he can spy on his daughter. Seeing Katie and Timothy leave the dance early, Doug follows the couple to a motel party and pretends he is a room service waiter. Katie tells Timothy that she does not wish to have sex and asks him to take her home, but he is concerned about upholding his promiscuous reputation, and refuses to leave. Hearing commotion inside the bedroom, Doug kicks down the door and falls on top of Timothy as Katie runs away. Doug gives chase in a car and hears Dr. Fishbinder on his radio show, admitting that he does not have a daughter of his own. Enraged by the doctor’s deception, Doug drives to the station and yanks Fishbinder from the microphone. However, he trips and falls through the window, landing three stories below. Unharmed, Doug gives an account to police and Janet arrives with news that Katie has changed her mind about going to Paris, and is awaiting her plane. Police escort Doug to the airport, and he finds Katie just in time. He apologizes, and she admits he was right to mistrust Timothy. As Katie boards the plane, she reunites with the brokenhearted Richard, who is also attending the school trip. Back home, Doug learns that his on-air fight with Dr. Fishbinder caused an upsurge in the radio show’s ratings. He decides to co-host a program with the psychiatrist about child rearing. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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