Trust Me (1989)

R | 93 mins | Comedy | 10 November 1989

Director:

Bobby Houston

Producer:

George Edwards

Cinematographer:

Thomas Jewett

Editor:

Barry Zetlin

Production Company:

Trust Me Productions
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HISTORY

Actor Adam Ant, birth name Stuart Leslie Goddard, who portrayed “James Callendar,” is better known as the lead singer for the post-punk rock group, Adam and the Ants.
       Actors Joyce Van Patten and Talia Balsam are mother and daughter. Trust Me marks the first time the two worked together in a theatrical feature film. Both were cast without knowing the other was auditioning. Producers were unaware of the their relationship.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, writer-director Bobby Houston was sick of being in “development hell,” and decided to create a low-budget film based on the art world that he could get produced. He based the Trust Me screenplay on his experiences in the modern art world.
       Principal photography lasted twenty-one days in Los Angeles, CA. Production was completed three days ahead of schedule and under budget. ... More Less

Actor Adam Ant, birth name Stuart Leslie Goddard, who portrayed “James Callendar,” is better known as the lead singer for the post-punk rock group, Adam and the Ants.
       Actors Joyce Van Patten and Talia Balsam are mother and daughter. Trust Me marks the first time the two worked together in a theatrical feature film. Both were cast without knowing the other was auditioning. Producers were unaware of the their relationship.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, writer-director Bobby Houston was sick of being in “development hell,” and decided to create a low-budget film based on the art world that he could get produced. He based the Trust Me screenplay on his experiences in the modern art world.
       Principal photography lasted twenty-one days in Los Angeles, CA. Production was completed three days ahead of schedule and under budget.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Los Angeles Times
10 Nov 1989
p. 13.
Variety
27 Sep 1989
pp. 42-43.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Bruce R. Feldman, Harry Clein, and David Weisman present
A film by Bobby Houston
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr/1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Swing grip/Elec
Swing grip/Elec
Swing grip/Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Swing grip
ART DIRECTORS
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop
COSTUMES
Asst ward
MUSIC
Mus supv
Stereo rerec mixer
Mus supv
Addl mus by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer 1
Re-rec mixer 2
Rec
Transfers
Sd EFX supv
Rec supv
Sd des
Post sd
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles & opticals by
MAKEUP
Asst makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Artwork by
Artwork by
Artwork by
Artwork by
Artwork by
Artwork by
Artwork by
Artwork by
Artwork by
Artwork by
Visual consultant
Scr supv
Prod coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst casting
Atmosphere talent
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col & prints
SOURCES
SONGS
“Take A Letter Maria,” performed by Hearts & Minds, composed by R. B. Greaves
“Smoke Gets In Your Eyes,” performed by Mina Aoe, composed by Jerome Kern, Otto Harbach, courtesy of Victor Musical Industries, Inc.
“Too Good For You,” performed and composed by Denise Rich
+
SONGS
“Take A Letter Maria,” performed by Hearts & Minds, composed by R. B. Greaves
“Smoke Gets In Your Eyes,” performed by Mina Aoe, composed by Jerome Kern, Otto Harbach, courtesy of Victor Musical Industries, Inc.
“Too Good For You,” performed and composed by Denise Rich
“Secret Agent Man,” performed by Hearts and Minds with Ken Tanaka, composed by P. F. Sloan and Steve Barri
“Soul Shimmy,” performed by Gex Sawton, composed by Don Was
“Hot You’re Cool,” performed and composed by General Public, courtesy of I. R. S. Records
“Frkn ‘N’ Rkn,” performed and composed by Kyle Johnson
“It’s Only A Paper Moon,” performed by Johnny Kerouac, composed by Harold Arlen, Billy Rose, and E. Y. Harburg
“Lightnin’ Strikes,” performed by Denita James & Rick Boston, composed by Lou Christie & Twyla Herbert.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 November 1989
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 November 1989
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Lenses
Camera & lenses provided by Ultravision
Duration(in mins):
93
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28858
SYNOPSIS

Art dealer James Callendar is in debt. His maid has quit and his Porsche’s car telephone has been repossessed. He learns that Marty Potts, an artist he tried to recruit, has died, making his pictures worth a fortune to Callendar’s competition. He calls Mary Cassal, Potts’s manager, and congratulates her on her good fortune. Meanwhile, Sam Brown, a messenger, is given a dog’s stool sample to bring to a veterinary laboratory to be tested for worms. On the way, he stops at Callendar’s gallery to look at the paintings. Catherine Walker recognizes him from high school and asks about his nervous breakdown. Sam runs out, forgetting the stool sample. Later, Catherine and office boy Billy Brawthwaite are licking envelopes when James observes that he needs to sign a hot young artist whom he could later murder. Catherine becomes upset, but Billy Brawthwaite tells her that Callendar is kidding. That evening, Sam Brown returns to the gallery to retrieve the package of dog feces. Billy attempts to flirt with him, notices Sam has paint on his shoe, and asks if he is an artist. Sam admits he dabbles. James Callendar appears and asks for a sample. Sam shows him a drawing, which is really good. The next day, James and Catherine go to Sam’s loft. After viewing one of Sam’s paintings, James wants to sign him, but Sam resists, saying he is not for sale. James sends Sam out for tea, then discovers all his other pictures and photographs them. When Sam returns, Catherine takes him for a walk. Sam ... +


Art dealer James Callendar is in debt. His maid has quit and his Porsche’s car telephone has been repossessed. He learns that Marty Potts, an artist he tried to recruit, has died, making his pictures worth a fortune to Callendar’s competition. He calls Mary Cassal, Potts’s manager, and congratulates her on her good fortune. Meanwhile, Sam Brown, a messenger, is given a dog’s stool sample to bring to a veterinary laboratory to be tested for worms. On the way, he stops at Callendar’s gallery to look at the paintings. Catherine Walker recognizes him from high school and asks about his nervous breakdown. Sam runs out, forgetting the stool sample. Later, Catherine and office boy Billy Brawthwaite are licking envelopes when James observes that he needs to sign a hot young artist whom he could later murder. Catherine becomes upset, but Billy Brawthwaite tells her that Callendar is kidding. That evening, Sam Brown returns to the gallery to retrieve the package of dog feces. Billy attempts to flirt with him, notices Sam has paint on his shoe, and asks if he is an artist. Sam admits he dabbles. James Callendar appears and asks for a sample. Sam shows him a drawing, which is really good. The next day, James and Catherine go to Sam’s loft. After viewing one of Sam’s paintings, James wants to sign him, but Sam resists, saying he is not for sale. James sends Sam out for tea, then discovers all his other pictures and photographs them. When Sam returns, Catherine takes him for a walk. Sam has social anxiety and all the babies in his paintings represent escape to a new life. Callendar drives Catherine back to his house to find his piano has been repossessed. Claiming he is too despondent to be left alone, he drags Catherine to the bedroom. The next morning, he sends Billy Brawthwaite to Sam’s place to pick him up for a meeting. When his mother, Nettie Brown, telephones, Sam refuses to pick up the phone, so Billy answers and tells her Sam is undressing and has a cute body. Nettie hangs up and pours herself a half bottle of whiskey. At Callendar’s office, Sam learns that one of his paintings has been sold to Holly Windsor, a wealthy socialite, sight unseen. He turns down Callendar’s offer to give him a one man show after the art dealer is rude to Catherine. Callendar gives Catherine a check and orders her to get one of Sam’s pictures. Sam returns home to find Denise Tipton, a loudly dressed high school classmate, who informs him that his mother has arranged a dinner date for them. The date is at Nettie’s home, where she complains that Sam turned down his brother’s offer to run an ice cream store and instead is a failed artist. She implies he is homosexual and tells Denise the date was a mistake. Unable to get rid of Denise, Sam returns home with her to find Catherine there. Pretending Catherine is his girl friend, Sam gives her a big kiss, and Denise beats a hasty retreat. Catherine pulls Sam into bed and they make love. Later, he refuses to take any money from Catherine, and gives her a huge painting of a cherub playing with a soccer ball. He tells her he loves her, but before she can respond, rats running across the rafters interrupt them, causing Catherine to leave. The next day, Catherine brings Sam’s painting to the gallery, explaining it will not fit in her apartment. When Callendar accuses her of sleeping with Sam, Catherine remarks that he was a “vast” improvement over him. Later, over Catherine’s protests, James hands the picture over to Holly for $20 thousand. Catherine calls Sam who demands she get it back. A few days later, Catherine accompanies Sam to a party at Holly’s. When he sees his painting, Sam yanks it from the wall and attempts to carry it home. Catherine drives up, opens the door and rips the painting. The next day, Catherine tells Sam he must make more money as she refuses to live in a rat infested loft. Sam gives in and agrees to sell one painting for $10 thousand. Catherine informs Callendar, who then takes Billy Brawthwaite to steal the rest of Sam’s art. Sam calls infuriated, but Catherine tells him Callendar is busy with a critic from the New York Times. Sam rushes over and overhears Holly asking Billy if Catherine and James Callendar are no longer sleeping together. That is the final straw and Sam breaks up with Catherine. Weeks later, Mac, Sam’s only friend, convinces him to attend a showing of his work that Callendar has arranged. Unaware that Catherine quit that morning, Sam and Mac go to the gallery to discover all his paintings hung upside down. Sam is further distressed to discover his mother and Denise Tipton in attendance. Catherine arrives and Billy tells her that rumor has it Marty Pott’s manager, Mary Cassal, was sitting next to Marty when he choked to death on a chicken bone while flying first class. According to Billy Brawthwaite, she was wearing headphones and claimed not to notice Marty choking. When Billy leaves, Nettie meets Catherine and asks how she knows Sam. When Catherine tells her they are living together, Nettie yells that Sam is gay. Sam sees his mother, downs three drinks and tries to take a painting that Callendar titled “Dead Baby #7” from the wall. A woman tells him how much the title disturbs her. Sam asks if it is not trendy enough for her, and she slaps him. When Sam passes out, Callendar orders a photographer to snap a picture that later appears in the newspaper with the headline, “Painter Sam Brown Goes Belly-Up in Style.” Sam is distressed that, although his work is praised, the review refers to him as a schizophrenic. His rant is interrupted when he receives a call from Mary Cassal asking for a meeting. Meanwhile, Callendar contacts a hitman to kill Sam, but decides to do it himself when he discovers the killer will not take a check. He returns to his office to receives a call from Sam saying he is going to let Mary Cassal handle his career. Callendar explains he sold the paintings, but Sam warns Callendar he does not have a contract with him and demands he retrieve the art. Catherine tries to warn Sam that Mary is also evil, but he refuses to listen. Mary and Sam go to the gallery to retrieve the paintings, but Sam tells Mary he will wait in the outer office. After Callendar accuses Mary of letting Marty Potts die choking on a chicken bone, she informs Sam that Callendar will be handling him. Sam rushes home and telephones Catherine with the news that Callendar gave him a check for $50 thousand dollars. Catherine informs him the art dealer has nothing in the bank and pleads with him to get out of the loft. Before he can take her advice, Callendar arrives with a bottle of champagne and a briefcase, but as he removes a gun from the case, he spots a rat on the rafter. Callendar grabs a baseball bat, swings at the rodent, misses and hits a porcelain baby doll mobile. The mobile crashes down on Sam and knocks him unconscious. Callendar puts Sam’s head into an oven and turns on the gas, but the artist comes to and grabs his attacker. As they struggle, Nettie arrives, and thinking she is witnessing a homosexual tryst, she runs off. Callendar knocks Sam unconscious with the champagne bottle, places his head back in the oven, sets a suicide note by the phone and leaves. Sam’s landlord smells the gas and enters the room, forgetting he is smoking a cigarette. The loft explodes as Catherine drives up. Years later, Catherine owns the gallery and is making millions off of the paintings Sam left her in his will. Although everyone thinks Sam died in the explosion, he is living secretly with Catherine, and their baby. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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