16 Days of Glory (1985)

G | 145 mins | Documentary | 23 October 1985

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HISTORY

Opening credits state: “This film is dedicated to Cappy Petrash Greenspan, 1931-1983.” End credits include the following acknowledgements: “ 16 Days of Glory was filmed in Fujicolor, official film of the Los Angeles 1984 Olympics; The Producers would like to thank the more than 7,000 athletes, the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee and its volunteers for making this film possible.”
       According to the 16 Nov 1982 LAT, Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation won the production and distribution rights for the official film to document the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, CA. After formal presentations in front of the Olympic committee from several studios and independent production companies, Fox was selected, and agreed to pay the committee $1 million in royalties for “exclusive film, cable, videocassette, disc and other exploitation rights.” The deal excluded the creation of an animated film, as another party was in talks to make an Olympic animated feature. Fox anticipated a $5 million-plus budget, and named Bud Greenspan as their director of choice.
       LAT reported Olympic Games being filmed as far back as the 1912 Games in Stockholm, Sweden, and referenced Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia, based on the 1936 Berlin, Germany Olympics, as the first “complete” Olympic documentary. A theatrical release was planned for the Fox production. Restrictions set by the Olympic committee prohibited its U.S. theatrical and cable television release until one year after the event. However, within ninety-days, the documentary could be released internationally, and/or released in the U.S. on disc and videocassette.
       The 18 Feb 1983 DV reported that Fox held a luncheon for fifty-six gold medal ... More Less

Opening credits state: “This film is dedicated to Cappy Petrash Greenspan, 1931-1983.” End credits include the following acknowledgements: “ 16 Days of Glory was filmed in Fujicolor, official film of the Los Angeles 1984 Olympics; The Producers would like to thank the more than 7,000 athletes, the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee and its volunteers for making this film possible.”
       According to the 16 Nov 1982 LAT, Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation won the production and distribution rights for the official film to document the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, CA. After formal presentations in front of the Olympic committee from several studios and independent production companies, Fox was selected, and agreed to pay the committee $1 million in royalties for “exclusive film, cable, videocassette, disc and other exploitation rights.” The deal excluded the creation of an animated film, as another party was in talks to make an Olympic animated feature. Fox anticipated a $5 million-plus budget, and named Bud Greenspan as their director of choice.
       LAT reported Olympic Games being filmed as far back as the 1912 Games in Stockholm, Sweden, and referenced Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia, based on the 1936 Berlin, Germany Olympics, as the first “complete” Olympic documentary. A theatrical release was planned for the Fox production. Restrictions set by the Olympic committee prohibited its U.S. theatrical and cable television release until one year after the event. However, within ninety-days, the documentary could be released internationally, and/or released in the U.S. on disc and videocassette.
       The 18 Feb 1983 DV reported that Fox held a luncheon for fifty-six gold medal Olympians and announced production plans including the hiring of Bud Greenspan as director and producer, and his wife, Cappy Petrash Greenspan, as writer and associate producer. The couple planned to set out around the globe immediately to interview athletes as they trained for the Olympics. A $3 million budget was reported, and it was expected that around twenty camera crews consisting of two to three persons each would be needed to cover the games. Cappy Petrash Greenspan died from cancer less then four months later, on 3 Jun 1983.
       According to the 25 Jul 1984 LAT, Twentieth Century Fox transferred its rights to Bud Greenspan, who planned to move forward with the documentary using independent financing. Greenspan teamed with Milt Okun to co-finance, and each reportedly contributed $2.7 million of their own funds to produce the film. Fox was rumored to have backed out after concerns that the budget would exceed the planned $3.5 million. To keep costs from skyrocketing on the now independent feature, Greenspan deferred his own fees, and was in talks with three studios to finalize a distribution deal.
       The 28 Feb 1986 HR noted that athletes were interviewed in eleven different countries, and 150 technicians shot over 200 hours of footage using eighteen cameras at the Olympic Games’ twenty-one Los Angeles area venues.
       According to the 8 Nov 1984 HR, over a million feet of footage was captured during the Olympic Games, and a Mar 1985 completion date was expected. Greenspan noted that with the extensive amount of “great material,” he anticipated creating a three-hour film, and announced plans to produce two televised mini-series based on the Games.
       The 14 Mar 1985 HR reported that filmmakers were not certain whether the documentary would first be released in theaters, or as a miniseries on NBC (National Broadcasting Company). The 19 Jun 1985 HR reported that both theatrical and television versions were being prepared.
       The 29 Jun 1985 Screen International announced that 16 Days of Glory would have a world premiere benefit on 29 Jul 1985, for the Los Angeles Times fund, to be held at AMPAS’s Samuel Goldwyn Theatre.
       According to the 17 Jul 1985 HR, production had been completed on the documentary, which had a running time of five-hours in its longest version. Other versions were created for theatrical, television, and home video release. The 1 Aug 1985 HR reported that the theatrical release would be two-and-a-half hours long, and a television version would be six-hours.
       A benefit screening was held on 18 Sep 1985 at NY’s Avery Fisher hall, as announced in the 18 Sep 1985 Var. The beneficiaries for the event were the NY Road Runner’s Club, the Central Park Conservancy, and the Cappy Petrash Greenspan Foundation, a sports-related grant funding organization named in honor of the director’s late wife.
       The 10 Oct 1985 HR reported that 16 Days of Glory would be released for a week-long engagement at a Santa Monica, CA, theater, on 23 Oct 1985, in order to qualify for Academy Award contention. The 24 Oct 1985 HR noted Laemmle’s Monica 4-Plex as the theater. According to the 30 Oct 1985 HR, the film was held over for a second week.
       The 25 Oct 1985 Daily News reported that Bud Greenspan and his partner Milton Okun paid $1 million for film rights, plus an additional $4 million in production costs, and reported that they were currently weeding through distribution offers from several major studios. The 5 Feb 1986 DV announced that Paramount had acquired distribution rights.
       Bud Greenspan received an award from the International Documentary Association for 16 Days of Glory, according to the 22 Nov 1985 LAT.
       According to the 28 Feb 1986 HR, the NY premiere would be held at the Guild Theater on 7 Mar 1986. The 6 Mar 1986 HR reported the documentary would also open the same day in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., followed a week later in twenty-seven additional cities.
       The 19 Jun 1987 HR announced that 16 Days of Glory was buried in a time capsule, as part of a ceremony held at the Los Angeles Coliseum. The news item also mentioned that The Disney Channel would premiere the second half of the ten-hour documentary on 20 Jun 1987.
       According to the 23 Oct 1987 HR, Bud Greenspan was in talks with PBS (Public Broadcasting Service) to bring a five-hour cut of his film to premiere in Spring 1988. The 28 Apr 1988 HR announced that the picture would air on PBS as a six-part miniseries beginning 20 Jul 1988. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily News
25 Oct 1985
---
Daily News
7 Mar 1986
---
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1983
p. 36
Daily Variety
5 Feb 1986
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 1984
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jul 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Oct 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 1985
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 1985
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Feb 1986
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 1986
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jun 1987
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1987
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 1988
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
27 Jul 1984
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Nov 1982
p. 1, 4
Los Angeles Times
25 Jul 1984
p. 5
Los Angeles Times
23 Oct 1985
p. 7
Los Angeles Times
22 Nov 1985
p. 16
New York Times
7 Mar 1986
p. 15
Screen International
29 Jun 1985
---
Variety
18 Sep 1985
---
Variety
12 Mar 1986
p. 16, 32
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Cappy Productions, Inc. in association with Milton Okun presents
Produced by Cappy Productions, Inc. in association with Milton Okun presents
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Prod mgr
2d unit dir, Los Angeles
2d unit dir, Los Angeles
2d unit dir, Los Angeles
2d unit dir, Los Angeles
2d unit dir, Los Angeles
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Sr prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Des of Olympic photog
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam equip liaison
Cam dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Ed room asst
Ed room asst
Ed room asst
Ed room asst
Los Angeles ed
Negative matching
MUSIC
Mus score
Soloist
Mus prod by
SOUND
Supv eng sd and communications
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Sd asst
Sd asst
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Opt eff, The Optical House, Inc. N.Y.
Title des
PRODUCTION MISC
Coord prod
Olympic cinematic consultant
Venue capt
Venue capt
Venue capt
Venue capt
Asst venue capt
Asst to the prod
Asst to the coord prod
Prod staff - New York
Prod staff - New York
Prod staff - New York
Prod office coord
Loc auditor
Transportation coord
Dispatcher
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Olympic liaison
Travel arrangements courtesy
COLOR PERSONNEL
Spec consultant
Col grader
SOURCES
SONGS
Soloist: Placido Domingo
The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
The Harlow-Hatfield Philharmonic and Nelp Combined Choir
+
SONGS
Soloist: Placido Domingo
The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
The Harlow-Hatfield Philharmonic and Nelp Combined Choir
Choral Director: Michael Kibblewhite
Conductor: Lee Holdridge
"Hymn To The Nations," based on "Inno Delle Nazione," by Giuseppe Verdi and Arrigo Boito, adapted and arranged by Lee Holdridge, English lyrics by Dominique Mancinelli
"Victory Theme," based on a Theme by Hector Berlioz, adapted and arranged by Lee Holdridge
"Olympic Hymn," by Spirou Samara, adapted and arranged by Lee Holdridge
"Hark And Hear My Trumpet Sounding" (Appalachian Hymn), adapted and arranged by Lee Holdridge
"Days Of Glory," by Lee Holdridge
"Los Angeles Olympic Theme," by John Williams
"The Olympian," by Philip Glass.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 October 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 23 October 1985
New York opening: 7 March 1986
Production Date:
began early 1983
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Panaflex and Panastar cameras and lenses by Panavision, Inc. of California
Duration(in mins):
145
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

The 1984 Olympics held in Los Angeles, California, are covered. Between highlights of the opening and closing ceremonies, the following athletes are profiled: 5,000-meter runner Dave Moorcroft; judo competitor Yasuhiro Yamashita; runner Edwin Moses; swimmers Ambrose “Rowdy” Gaines, IV, John Moffet, and Michael Gross; decathletes Daley Thompson and Juergen Hingsen; women gymnasts including Mary Lou Retton; and marathon runners Julie Brown, Joan Benoit, Ingrid Kristiansen, and Grete ... +


The 1984 Olympics held in Los Angeles, California, are covered. Between highlights of the opening and closing ceremonies, the following athletes are profiled: 5,000-meter runner Dave Moorcroft; judo competitor Yasuhiro Yamashita; runner Edwin Moses; swimmers Ambrose “Rowdy” Gaines, IV, John Moffet, and Michael Gross; decathletes Daley Thompson and Juergen Hingsen; women gymnasts including Mary Lou Retton; and marathon runners Julie Brown, Joan Benoit, Ingrid Kristiansen, and Grete Waitz. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Subject (Minor):
Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.