Summer Rental (1985)

PG | 88 mins | Comedy | 9 August 1985

Director:

Carl Reiner

Producer:

George Shapiro

Cinematographer:

Ric Waite

Editor:

Bud Molin

Production Designer:

Peter Wooley

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

A note in end credits states the picture was "filmed on location in Florida and Georgia."
       According to Army Archerd’s 7 May 1985 “Just for Variety” column in DV, the inspiration for the picture came from a real-life incident in which executive producer Bernie Brillstein rented a beach house and “returned one night to find the house crawling with uninvited guests—invited by Bernie’s client John Belushi who, in soaking wet and sand-filled trunks, was sleeping in Brillstein’s bed.” With some variation, a similar scene was incorporated into the Summer Rental screenplay. Archerd also noted that this was the first project to be green-lighted by new Paramount production head Ned Tanen. Although the project had originated under former Paramount executive Jeffrey Katzenberg, and it is common practice for new studio heads to wipe production slates clean and develop new projects, Tanen liked the project and allowed it to continue. Tanen was quoted in a 10 Aug 1985 LAHExam item as saying, “It was quite a good script and we had no product. There was a vacant spot of about six months on our release schedule. When all the geniuses are through, that’s as good a reason as any to make a movie.”
       In an 8 Mar 1985 HR article, Cliff Rothman reported that Carl Reiner had been signed to direct the film, which was scheduled to begin shooting in St. Petersburg, Florida, on 18 Mar 1985, on a nine-week shooting schedule. According to Reiner, the project came together quickly, with the script being completed in a couple of months. It was hoped that the ... More Less

A note in end credits states the picture was "filmed on location in Florida and Georgia."
       According to Army Archerd’s 7 May 1985 “Just for Variety” column in DV, the inspiration for the picture came from a real-life incident in which executive producer Bernie Brillstein rented a beach house and “returned one night to find the house crawling with uninvited guests—invited by Bernie’s client John Belushi who, in soaking wet and sand-filled trunks, was sleeping in Brillstein’s bed.” With some variation, a similar scene was incorporated into the Summer Rental screenplay. Archerd also noted that this was the first project to be green-lighted by new Paramount production head Ned Tanen. Although the project had originated under former Paramount executive Jeffrey Katzenberg, and it is common practice for new studio heads to wipe production slates clean and develop new projects, Tanen liked the project and allowed it to continue. Tanen was quoted in a 10 Aug 1985 LAHExam item as saying, “It was quite a good script and we had no product. There was a vacant spot of about six months on our release schedule. When all the geniuses are through, that’s as good a reason as any to make a movie.”
       In an 8 Mar 1985 HR article, Cliff Rothman reported that Carl Reiner had been signed to direct the film, which was scheduled to begin shooting in St. Petersburg, Florida, on 18 Mar 1985, on a nine-week shooting schedule. According to Reiner, the project came together quickly, with the script being completed in a couple of months. It was hoped that the film could be released by early Aug 1985. To meet the release schedule, it was stated that two film editing crews would work to expedite the finished film. A 29 Mar 1985 article in Back Stage noted that the picture was scheduled for only a six-week shoot. However, production notes in AMPAS library file stated that the film shot over seven weeks in St. Petersburg and then moved to Atlanta, GA, where principal photography was completed on 15 May 1985. Summer Rental marked John Candy’s first starring role in a feature film.
       The picture opened in 1,500 theaters. Critical reaction was tepid. In his 10 Aug 1985 Washington Post review, Paul Attanasio quipped that the film “is the kind of movie that could make you wish you had poison ivy—at least the scratching would occupy your mind.” The 7 Aug 1985 issue of DV review stated, “This is more a collection of bits . . . than a coherent story.” According to the Oct 1985 Box, the quality of the film suffered because it was rushed through production in order to meet a summer 1985 release deadline. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Backstage
29 Mar 1985.
---
Box Office
Oct 1985.
---
Daily Variety
7 May 1985.
---
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 1985
p. 3.
LAHExam
10 Aug 1985.
---
Los Angeles Times
9 Aug 1985
p. 16.
New York Times
9 Aug 1985
p. 13.
Variety
7 Aug 1985
p. 18.
Washington Post
10 Aug 1985.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Bernie Brillstein Production
A Carl Reiner Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Key grip
Stillman
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Men`s cost
Ladies' cost
MUSIC
Mus rec mixer
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd eff ed
Supv sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
ADR ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Group looping coord
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Addl casting
Addl casting
Extra casting
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Reiner
Asst to Mr. Shapiro
Asst to Mr. Brillstein
Loc mgr
Prod auditor
Asst auditor
Asst to Mr. Miller
Transportation coord
Animal trainer
16 foot Pelican and Skiff by
STAND INS
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
"Turning Around," written by Jimmy Buffett, Michael Utley & Will Jennings, performed by Jimmy Buffett, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"Axel F," written by Harold Faltermeyer
"Dolores," written by Frank Loesser & Louis Alter, performed by Carl Reiner
+
SONGS
"Turning Around," written by Jimmy Buffett, Michael Utley & Will Jennings, performed by Jimmy Buffett, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
"Axel F," written by Harold Faltermeyer
"Dolores," written by Frank Loesser & Louis Alter, performed by Carl Reiner
"Footloose," written by Kenny Loggins & Dean Pitchford
"I'm a Hot Blooded Man," written by Bishop Holiday, Scott Lipsker & Harold Payne
"'Love Boat' Theme," written by Charles Fox & Paul Williams
"Tangerine," written by Johnny Mercer & Victor Schertzinger.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 August 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 9 August 1985
Production Date:
18 March--15 May 1985
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
13 September 1985
Copyright Number:
PA262551
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
gauge
35mm
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex® cameras by Panavision®; Prints by Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
88
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27835
SYNOPSIS

Burned out after thirteen years as an air traffic controller, Jack Chester is placed on a mandatory five-day vacation. His supervisor arranges for Jack and his family – wife Sandy, teenage daughter Jennifer, pre-teen Bobby, and toddler Laurie—to rent a vacation house in Citrus Cove, Florida. On their first evening in town, the Chesters wait in line for a table at a fancy restaurant. Just as they are about to be seated, Al Pellet, a wealthy year-round local, cuts in line and also reserves the five lobsters that Jack has been eying in the restaurant’s fresh lobster tank. When Jack confronts the maître d’, he is told that Pellet had a reservation, even though the restaurant does not take reservations. Jack makes a scene, willing to be shoved aside for a table but not to lose the lobsters. In the ensuing verbal altercation, Pellet makes it clear that as a longtime resident, he has no fondness for tourists. The maître d’ intervenes, telling Jack a table will be ready for him in twenty minutes, but Jack refuses to patronize the establishment. Instead, he takes his family to the Barnacle, a tiny and decidedly downscale oceanfront restaurant named after the owner Scully’s dilapidated sailboat that makes up one of the restaurant’s dining areas. Scully recommends “Scully’s catch of the day,” and describes the dish in such mouthwatering terms that the ravenous Jack orders five for himself and his family. Unbeknownst to Jack, Cortez the chef simply pulls five boxes of frozen fish sticks from the freezer. Later that night, the family is roused from sleep by the angry owners of the house the Chesters have mistakenly ... +


Burned out after thirteen years as an air traffic controller, Jack Chester is placed on a mandatory five-day vacation. His supervisor arranges for Jack and his family – wife Sandy, teenage daughter Jennifer, pre-teen Bobby, and toddler Laurie—to rent a vacation house in Citrus Cove, Florida. On their first evening in town, the Chesters wait in line for a table at a fancy restaurant. Just as they are about to be seated, Al Pellet, a wealthy year-round local, cuts in line and also reserves the five lobsters that Jack has been eying in the restaurant’s fresh lobster tank. When Jack confronts the maître d’, he is told that Pellet had a reservation, even though the restaurant does not take reservations. Jack makes a scene, willing to be shoved aside for a table but not to lose the lobsters. In the ensuing verbal altercation, Pellet makes it clear that as a longtime resident, he has no fondness for tourists. The maître d’ intervenes, telling Jack a table will be ready for him in twenty minutes, but Jack refuses to patronize the establishment. Instead, he takes his family to the Barnacle, a tiny and decidedly downscale oceanfront restaurant named after the owner Scully’s dilapidated sailboat that makes up one of the restaurant’s dining areas. Scully recommends “Scully’s catch of the day,” and describes the dish in such mouthwatering terms that the ravenous Jack orders five for himself and his family. Unbeknownst to Jack, Cortez the chef simply pulls five boxes of frozen fish sticks from the freezer. Later that night, the family is roused from sleep by the angry owners of the house the Chesters have mistakenly occupied. Having gotten the addresses mixed up, the Chesters find their actual rental home is terribly run down, has plumbing problems, and is nestled between a construction project on one side and a public access path to the beach on the other. On top of everything else, the landlord is in intensive care and cannot be reached. At the beach, Jack is unused to relaxing and seems only to embarrass his family, but when he spots a beautiful sailboat in the water, he remembers he is a great sailor and proposes to take his son sailing. At a boat rental facility, Jack discovers all the boats are rented for the next two weeks as people prepare for the local regatta. When he asks if there are any other rental facilities, Jack is referred to Scully, who rents a puny boat to Jack and Bobby. While they're out on the water, they see the fancy Incisor, owned by Al Pellet, and Bobby asks his dad to sail by for a closer look. As the sailboats approach, and with each skipper believing he has the right of way and refusing to change course, Jack crashes into Pellet. Both men injure their knees in the collision, and Pellet once again vows to avenge the “renter.” While Jack is laid up at home with his bad knee, Sandy takes the kids to the movies. However, she forgets her wallet, and Don Moore, who is in line behind them with his teenaged son, Greg, offers to pay for the Chesters’ movie tickets and popcorn. Later, Moore invites them for a cruise on his powerboat. Sandy asks Jack if he wants to come along, but he does not feel up to it. While his family is out on the water, Jack meets the sexy next-door neighbor, Vicki Saunders, who drops by and mentions that she has been waiting for an opportunity to meet him. Vicki invites Jack over to her place for lemonade, but what she really wants is Jack's opinion about her new fake breasts, which she happily displays for him. When Vicki’s husband wakes up from his nap to come downstairs, Jack attempts a hasty retreat. Alas, Mr. Saunders seems unconcerned, and tells Jack that Vicki is insecure about her breast enhancement surgery and has been baring her chest to anyone who will look. Having left his front door open, Jack returns to his rental house to find that numerous beachgoers have barged inside to use the bathroom, get drinks, make phone calls and watch television. He chases them all out, then goes to Scully’s to get drunk. Once inebriated, Jack apologizes to Scully for damaging his boat, but the restaurant proprietor says it was equally his fault for not insisting that Jack take a sailing lesson. Scully offers to teach Jack how to really sail. For several days, Jack avoids going out with his family while he secretly takes sailing lessons. Sometime later, he learns that his landlord is “out of the hospital,” but the landlord has died and been replaced by Al Pellet. Jack hands Pellet a check for the last two weeks’ rent, but Pellet tears it up and says he would not accept a check from Jack if his children were starving in the streets. Pellet also demands that Jack and his family be out of the house by Saturday midnight. Upset at his family’s disappointment over leaving, Jack devises to enter the Citrus Cove Regatta in Scully’s boat, the Barnacle, and challenge Pellet to a bet. Jack signs a check for $1,000 and tells Pellet that if he loses the regatta, he can keep the money and Jack and his family will leave; but if Jack wins, he will keep the check and stay two more weeks rent-free. Jack and Scully fix up the Barnacle and send Scully’s friend, Angus MacLachlan, to find sails for the refurbished craft. Although the day before the race it looks as if there will be no sails, Angus manages to come through with a set at the last minute. When the race starts, the Barnacle gets off to a slow start and remains behind the pack for much of the race, but when Cortez comes topside eating frozen fish sticks, Scully realizes the chef ignored his instructions to remove the heavy food freezer from the boat. After lightening their load, the Barnacle begins to overtake the other sailboats, and when they need more sail, Jack uses his pants as added “cloth.” Against all odds, Jack and his crew win the regatta. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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