Another 48 Hrs. (1990)

R | 95 mins | Comedy | 8 June 1990

Director:

Walter Hill

Cinematographer:

Matthew F. Leonetti

Production Designer:

Joseph C. Nemec III

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

       Another 48 Hours was a sequel to 48 Hours (1982, see entry), the film that established Eddie Murphy as a star. The 8 Oct 1989 LAT reported Paramount Pictures wanted to call it 48 Hours II, but producer Walter Hill preferred the final title. According to an 11 Jun 1990 People item, the production cost $45 million. Murphy reportedly received a salary of $9 million, while co-star Nick Nolte was paid $3 million. The 9 Jul 1989 LAT reported the production would film in Las Vegas, NV. Filming was completed ahead of schedule, on 18 Apr 1990, according to the 23 Apr 1990 DV and production notes in AMPAS library files.
       Although the official location for Another 48 Hours was San Francisco, the 15 May 1990 DV and the 31 May 1990 LAT noted that a courtroom scene was filmed at the Board of Public Works hearing room on the third floor of Los Angeles City Hal in Los Angeles, CAl. Besides Los Angeles’ $200 per-day location fee, the producers contributed $5,000 to Project Restore, a group committed to restoring and beautifying the familiar Art Moderne Los Angeles City Hall. Another scene was filmed several blocks away at an office building near Fifth and Spring streets, according to the 5 Feb 1990 DV. The 17 Apr 1990 DV reported that the final shootout at the “Bird Cage” club was filmed in mid-Apr on Stage 17 at Paramount Studios in Hollywood. Documents in AMPAS library files mentioned that Las Vegas, NV, Sacramento, Baker, and Modesto, ... More Less

       Another 48 Hours was a sequel to 48 Hours (1982, see entry), the film that established Eddie Murphy as a star. The 8 Oct 1989 LAT reported Paramount Pictures wanted to call it 48 Hours II, but producer Walter Hill preferred the final title. According to an 11 Jun 1990 People item, the production cost $45 million. Murphy reportedly received a salary of $9 million, while co-star Nick Nolte was paid $3 million. The 9 Jul 1989 LAT reported the production would film in Las Vegas, NV. Filming was completed ahead of schedule, on 18 Apr 1990, according to the 23 Apr 1990 DV and production notes in AMPAS library files.
       Although the official location for Another 48 Hours was San Francisco, the 15 May 1990 DV and the 31 May 1990 LAT noted that a courtroom scene was filmed at the Board of Public Works hearing room on the third floor of Los Angeles City Hal in Los Angeles, CAl. Besides Los Angeles’ $200 per-day location fee, the producers contributed $5,000 to Project Restore, a group committed to restoring and beautifying the familiar Art Moderne Los Angeles City Hall. Another scene was filmed several blocks away at an office building near Fifth and Spring streets, according to the 5 Feb 1990 DV. The 17 Apr 1990 DV reported that the final shootout at the “Bird Cage” club was filmed in mid-Apr on Stage 17 at Paramount Studios in Hollywood. Documents in AMPAS library files mentioned that Las Vegas, NV, Sacramento, Baker, and Modesto, CA, were also used as locations.
       Though actress Tisha Campbell portrays “Amy Smith,” the daughter of “Kirkland Smith,” the character is listed in the credits as “Amy Kirkland.”
       After the film’s nationwide release on 8 Jun 1990, other producers, particularly Carolco/Tri-Star, whose Total Recall competed for the weekend’s top grosses, doubted Paramount Pictures’ claim of an opening “box-office” of $19.5 million. The 11 Jun 1990 HR and 14 Jun 1990 DV reported that Paramount was “opening its books” listing every screen playing Another 48 Hours in the U.S. and Canada. Competitors claimed the film tallied no more than $17.4 million. DV agreed with Paramount after checking the studio’s calculations. The film's eventual gross, according to documents in AMPAS library files, was $78 million.
      End credits contain the following information: “Based on characters created by Roger Spottiswoode and Walter Hill & Larry Gross and Steven E. De Souza.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Feb 1990.
p. 2.
Daily Variety
17 Apr 1990.
p. 2.
Daily Variety
23 Apr 1990
p. 20.
Daily Variety
15 May 1990.
p.3.
Daily Variety
6 Jun 1990
p. 12.
Daily Variety
14 Jun 1990
p. 1, 15.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 1990
p. 6, 20.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jun 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
9 Jul 1989
p. 32.
Los Angeles Times
8 Oct 1989
p. 28.
Los Angeles Times
31 May 1990
Section B, p. 1, 8.
Los Angeles Times
8 Jun 1990
p. 1.
New York Times
8 Jun 1990
p. 12.
People
11 Jun 1990.
---
PM (Journal)
11 Jun 1990.
---
Variety
6 Jun 1990.
p. 11.
Variety
13 Jun 1990
p. 27.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Bar band:
Restroom girls:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Lawrence Gordon Production
In Association With Eddie Murphy Productions
A Walter Hill Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
D.G.A. trainee
WRITERS
Based on characters created by
Based on characters created by
Based on characters created by
Based on characters created by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Ultracam 35 cameras, lenses and equipment provided
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Paint foreperson
Prod painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus score comp by
Mus scoring mixer
Mus ed
Mus ed
Mus rec at
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd eff rec
Sd eff rec
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec facilities
ADR group coord
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Opticals by
Disco laser eff by
Disco laser eff by
Disco laser eff by
Disco laser eff by
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod auditor
Prod accountant
Set accountant
Accounting asst
Prod office coord
Prod office coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to prod
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Gordon
Asst to Mr. Gordon
Asst to Mr. Gordon
Asst to Mssrs. Wachs & Lipsky
Asst to Mr. Conte
Asst to Mr. Hill
Asst to Mr. Hill
Asst to Mssrs. Murphy, Jr. and Frith, Jr.
Asst to Mr. Murphy
Asst to Mr. Murphy
Asst to Mr. Murphy
Asst to Mr. Murphy
Asst to Mr. Murphy
Asst to Mr. Nolte
Asst to Mr. Nolte
Eddie Murphy Productions office mgr
Casting asst
Extra casting
Loc mgr
Loc Northern California
Loc dept asst
Loc dept asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
LAPD coord motor officer
Caterer
Cranes and dollys by
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
i
SONGS
"(The Boys Are) Back In Town," written and produced by Brian O'Neal, performed by The Busboys, supervised by Ira Newborn
"(The Boys Are) Back In Town," by Brian O'Neal, performed by Jesse Johnson, produced by Jeff Lorber & Jesse Johnson, Jesse Johnson performs courtesy of A&M Records
"Cajun Panther," by Ron Young, Tom Morris, Lauren Molinare, Jimmy Hayne & Fidel Paniagua, performed by Little Caesar, courtesy of Geffin Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
+
SONGS
"(The Boys Are) Back In Town," written and produced by Brian O'Neal, performed by The Busboys, supervised by Ira Newborn
"(The Boys Are) Back In Town," by Brian O'Neal, performed by Jesse Johnson, produced by Jeff Lorber & Jesse Johnson, Jesse Johnson performs courtesy of A&M Records
"Cajun Panther," by Ron Young, Tom Morris, Lauren Molinare, Jimmy Hayne & Fidel Paniagua, performed by Little Caesar, courtesy of Geffin Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Drinking Them Beers," by Bill Chappell, peformed by and courtesy of Tompall Glaser
"Give It All You Got," by Michael Williams, performed by Curio, produced by Stewart Levine, Curio performs courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
"I Got The Feelin'," written by James Brown
"I Just Can't Let It End," by Lamont Dozier, performed by Curio, produced by Stewart Levine, Curio performs courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
"I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive," by Hank Williams & Fred Rose, performed by Michael Stanton, produced by Pete Anderson
"I'll All Right (Get Him A Doctor)," written and produced by Michael Doman, performed by The Broken Homes, The Broken Homes perform courtesy of MCA Records
"I've Got My Eye On You," by Lamont Dozier, performed by Curio, produced by Stewart Levine, Curio performs courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
"Paper Rosie," by Dallas Harms, performed by Gene Watson, courtesy of Capitol Records by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Roxanne," written by Sting.
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DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Another 48 Hours
48 Hours II
Release Date:
8 June 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 8 June 1990
New York opening: week of 8 June 1990
Production Date:
3 January--18 April 1990 in San Francisco, Los Angeles and other CA locations, and Las Vegas
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
15 June 1990
Copyright Number:
PA470446
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Technicolor®
Lenses
Duration(in mins):
95
Length(in feet):
8,599
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30193
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Western Brotherhood bikers Willie Hickok and Richard “Cherry” Ganz meet Malcolm Price at a remote desert bar. Price gives them $50,000 and a photograph of Reggie Hammond, an African American they are being paid to kill. When two California Highway Patrol officers stop in, the bikers shoot them, and Price kills the witnessing bartender. Elsewhere, at a motorcycle racetrack, Tyrone Burroughs gives $50,000 and the same photograph to a mechanic. Suddenly, when San Francisco police detective Jack Cates tries to arrest them, the mechanic pulls his gun. Jack returns fire, hitting him and a gasoline pump. In the explosion, Tyrone escapes across the track through speeding motorcycles. When Jack finds the photograph inside his partially burnt bag, he recognizes Reggie as a convict he knows. The fire apparently destroys all traces of the mechanic’s gun, and when Jack’s fellow detectives, Ben Kehoe and Frank Cruise, arrive with Internal Affairs supervisor Blake Wilson, there is no evidence that Jack fired in self-defense. Jack claims he was on a stakeout to capture a drug kingpin named “Iceman,” but Wilson declares Iceman to be a fantasy and that Jack, who has a record of being “trigger-happy,” killed the mechanic without provocation. Jack visits Reggie in prison. The convict, due to be released the next day, is angry at Jack for never visiting him during his seven years behind bars. He refuses to help Jack with the Iceman investigation, and when Jack threatens to withhold the money he has been keeping for him, Reggie hits him. The guards put Reggie in solitary confinement until his release. Meanwhile, the three bikers meet Tyrone at “Barnstormers,” a San Francisco motorcycle bar. After berating Malcolm for ... +


Western Brotherhood bikers Willie Hickok and Richard “Cherry” Ganz meet Malcolm Price at a remote desert bar. Price gives them $50,000 and a photograph of Reggie Hammond, an African American they are being paid to kill. When two California Highway Patrol officers stop in, the bikers shoot them, and Price kills the witnessing bartender. Elsewhere, at a motorcycle racetrack, Tyrone Burroughs gives $50,000 and the same photograph to a mechanic. Suddenly, when San Francisco police detective Jack Cates tries to arrest them, the mechanic pulls his gun. Jack returns fire, hitting him and a gasoline pump. In the explosion, Tyrone escapes across the track through speeding motorcycles. When Jack finds the photograph inside his partially burnt bag, he recognizes Reggie as a convict he knows. The fire apparently destroys all traces of the mechanic’s gun, and when Jack’s fellow detectives, Ben Kehoe and Frank Cruise, arrive with Internal Affairs supervisor Blake Wilson, there is no evidence that Jack fired in self-defense. Jack claims he was on a stakeout to capture a drug kingpin named “Iceman,” but Wilson declares Iceman to be a fantasy and that Jack, who has a record of being “trigger-happy,” killed the mechanic without provocation. Jack visits Reggie in prison. The convict, due to be released the next day, is angry at Jack for never visiting him during his seven years behind bars. He refuses to help Jack with the Iceman investigation, and when Jack threatens to withhold the money he has been keeping for him, Reggie hits him. The guards put Reggie in solitary confinement until his release. Meanwhile, the three bikers meet Tyrone at “Barnstormers,” a San Francisco motorcycle bar. After berating Malcolm for making a mess at the desert bar, Tyrone gives him a bag filled with dynamite. Nearby, Cherry threatens a barmaid as he demands the whereabouts of his former girl friend, Angel Lee, who used to work there. The barmaid says Angel lives in the North Beach neighborhood. The next day, a police review board concludes Jack’s shooting was a “wrongful action,” which opens him to prosecution. Jack’s partner, Ben, warns him to forget his search for Iceman and concentrate on protecting himself. The next day, before his release from prison, Reggie talks with Kirkland Smith, an older African American prisoner who protected him for seven years and now reminds Reggie he has a debt to pay as soon as he gets his money. Outside the gate, Jack offers Reggie a ride to San Francisco in his Cadillac, but Reggie refuses and waits for the prison bus. Nearby, looking through binoculars, Cherry recognizes Jack as the cop who killed his brother, Albert Ganz, after Reggie had “ratted him out.” Cherry and Willie follow Jack to a diner, and as Jack sits at the counter, Cherry shoots at him through the diner window. The two bikers catch up with Reggie’s bus, kill the driver, and shoot out a front tire, sending the bus flipping into a truck. As the hit men approach the wreckage, Reggie holds them off with the driver’s gun. Approaching Highway Patrol sirens send the bikers fleeing. At a hospital, a doctor tells Jack his bulletproof vest saved his life, but he will be sore because a bullet fractured his clavicle. In the adjoining emergency room, police question Reggie, but Jack takes custody of the former prisoner and drives him into San Francisco. He asks Reggie why Iceman wants him dead, but gets no answer. Jack takes Reggie to his house, where he has parked Reggie’s Porsche sports car on the street. When Reggie pushes the remote key to unlock it, the car explodes. Jack drives Reggie to police headquarters, but when they arrive, Reggie stays at a telephone booth outside and calls old friends to ask for money to get out of town. Everyone turns him down. Inside, Blake Wilson suspends Jack and confiscates his badge and service pistol. Using the police computer’s digital identification kit, Jack builds composite portraits of the black escapee at the motorcycle race and the biker who shot at him in the diner. He gives the sketches to Ben to run through the department files. Accepting a ride with Jack, Reggie admits he and Albert Ganz once stole half a million dollars from Iceman, which is why the kingpin wants to kill him. The cash Jack has been holding for seven years is part of the loot. He also recognized one of the bikers as Cherry Ganz, Albert’s brother, whose Chinese girl friend works at Barnstormers. There, the barmaid remembers three bikers meeting a black man, whom she identifies as the man in Jack’s computer sketch. She gives him Angel Lee’s address. At that moment, one of Jack’s former arrestees confronts him, and a brawl ensues, until Reggie fires shots from the barmaid’s pistol. Jack telephones Ben for information on the sketches, and asks to meet him outside the station in five minutes. Ben reports that Cherry Ganz has a string of murders behind him, including two Highway Patrol officers. At the King Mei Hotel, Jack sends Reggie to Angel Lee’s room. Inside, Angel and Willie are in bed when Reggie knocks. Willie fires shots through the door. Cherry, who has parked his bike in the alley and climbed a fire escape, sees Jack running up the stairs and cannot believe he is still alive. During a gunfight, both Willie and Cherry jump into a trash dumpster and escape on their motorcycles. When Ben, Frank, and other officers arrive, Frank tells Jack they cannot identify the black man in his sketch. After Reggie and Jack trick Angel into revealing that Malcolm Price is Cherry’s contact man, Reggie tells Jack the one man who might know the killers is Kirkland Smith, who protected him in prison. When they visit the convict, Kirkland identifies Jack’s black suspect as a drug dealer named Tyrone Burroughs. He also knows that Malcolm Price lives at the Sunset Motel on the Beltway in San Francisco. Meanwhile, Iceman visits Malcolm Price and shoots him. Later, looking at Malcolm’s body in the morgue, Jack complains that Iceman is always a step ahead of him, and Reggie suggests Iceman might be a cop. Reggie also admits the real reason Iceman wants him dead is that he can identify him. Knowing that his police hearing is being held at that moment, Jack takes Reggie to the courthouse to identify Blake Wilson, but Reggie says Wilson is not Iceman. The judge, angry at the intrusion, sets a date for Jack’s murder trial. Meanwhile, Willie and Cherry go to Tyrone Burrough’s place and demand to know who killed Malcolm Price. Tyrone says Iceman himself did it, because police were getting close. Reminding them they still have a contract on Reggie, Tyrone directs them to call on Kirkland Smith’s daughter, Amy, who works at a Goodwill Store, because it is likely that Reggie will contact her. Before the bikers leave, Cherry kills Tyrone. Jack takes Reggie to the station to retrieve the ex-con’s $450,000 from his police locker, then tells him to get out of town. Instead, Reggie goes to the Goodwill Store to give Amy her father’s $75,000 for protecting him. Hiding nearby, Willie and Cherry take Reggie and Amy prisoner. Willie telephones Frank Cruise, the man he thinks is Iceman, at police headquarters to tell him he has Reggie, but will not kill him unless he receives an added $500,000 for Malcolm’s death. Nearby, Detective Joe Stevens informs Jack that his mystery man, Tyrone Burroughs, was found murdered, and that he had a lengthy record. Wondering why Ben and Frank had no information on Tyrone, Jack sees Frank leave the building and follows him to a North Beach club called the “Bird Cage.” When Frank arrives, he gives Willie and Cherry a bag filled with the blackmail money and tells them to finish the job. Reggie alerts Willie that Frank is not Iceman. At that moment, both Jack and Ben appear from different directions. Reggie points at Ben and declares, “That’s Iceman.” Ben admits to Jack he took the mechanic’s gun at the racetrack to set him up for murder. A gunfight ensues, in which Frank and Willie are shot dead, and Cherry is shot and pushed out a window. Ben takes Reggie hostage and tries to back out of the club, but Jack shoots Reggie through the shoulder in order to get to his abductor. Wounded, Ben drops Reggie, leaving himself open, and Jack kills him. After medical attendants put Reggie into an ambulance, Jack tells him they still have Frank’s $500,000, which nobody else knows about. He gives the bag to Amy Smith for safekeeping until Reggie gets out of the hospital.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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