Transylvania 6-5000 (1985)

PG | 94 mins | Comedy | 8 November 1985

Director:

Rudy DeLuca

Writer:

Rudy DeLuca

Cinematographer:

Tom Pinter

Editor:

Harry Keller

Production Designer:

Zeljko Senecic

Production Company:

New World Pictures
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HISTORY

End credits include the following acknowledgement: “Location shooting in Yugoslavia with the cooperation of Jadran Film, Zagreb.”
       Referring to the film as Transylvania 6-500, the 15 Sep 1980 HR announced that Krofft International was developing the property. However, the company is not credited onscreen.
       The 6 Feb 1985 DV stated that New World Pictures would be producing the the $5.5 million picture, now titled Transylvania 6-5000, which would be writer Rudy DeLuca’s directorial debut for a feature film. At that time, he was known for his comedic work as a television actor and writer. Principal photography was set to begin in Yugoslavia on 29 Apr 1985. The 16 Apr 1985 HR reported a six-week filming schedule, and announced Zagreb, Yugoslavia, as a primary location. The 16 May 1985 DV added Samobar, Yugoslavia as a filming locale, and the 18 Jun 1985 HR reported the medieval Mokrice Castle was used as the castle in the film.
       According to the 7 Jul 1985 Daily News, the project was five-plus years in the making, with executive producers Arnie Fishman and Paul Lichtman, and director Rudy DeLuca approaching New World early on. However, New World turned down the project, until veteran producers Mace Neufeld and Thomas H. Brodek came on board, and New World agreed to fund most of the $5 million budget, with Dow Chemical Co. supplying the rest. According to the 16 May 1985 DV, filmmakers learned that Dow had a wealth of frozen Yugoslavian dinars from a previous business deal that could only be spent ... More Less

End credits include the following acknowledgement: “Location shooting in Yugoslavia with the cooperation of Jadran Film, Zagreb.”
       Referring to the film as Transylvania 6-500, the 15 Sep 1980 HR announced that Krofft International was developing the property. However, the company is not credited onscreen.
       The 6 Feb 1985 DV stated that New World Pictures would be producing the the $5.5 million picture, now titled Transylvania 6-5000, which would be writer Rudy DeLuca’s directorial debut for a feature film. At that time, he was known for his comedic work as a television actor and writer. Principal photography was set to begin in Yugoslavia on 29 Apr 1985. The 16 Apr 1985 HR reported a six-week filming schedule, and announced Zagreb, Yugoslavia, as a primary location. The 16 May 1985 DV added Samobar, Yugoslavia as a filming locale, and the 18 Jun 1985 HR reported the medieval Mokrice Castle was used as the castle in the film.
       According to the 7 Jul 1985 Daily News, the project was five-plus years in the making, with executive producers Arnie Fishman and Paul Lichtman, and director Rudy DeLuca approaching New World early on. However, New World turned down the project, until veteran producers Mace Neufeld and Thomas H. Brodek came on board, and New World agreed to fund most of the $5 million budget, with Dow Chemical Co. supplying the rest. According to the 16 May 1985 DV, filmmakers learned that Dow had a wealth of frozen Yugoslavian dinars from a previous business deal that could only be spent within the country, so they sent Dow a script and asked them to invest in the production. Dow agreed to supply the “entire below-the-line costs.”
       New World Pictures reportedly asked producer Mace Neufeld to prepare some follow-up stories for co-stars Ed Begley, Jr., and Jeff Goldblum’s characters, and intended for Rudy DeLuca to write and direct the series of “road” pictures, according to the 16 May 1985 DV.
       The 28 May 1985 DV announced that after filming one scene, actor Renee Taylor was offered a part on a Showtime cable network television series, and dropped out of the film. However, her husband, Joseph Bologna, continued to work on the picture as “Dr. Malavaqua.”
       The 13 Jun 1985 HR reported that principal photography had concluded, and a Halloween 1985 release was anticipated.
       The 17 Oct 1985 HR announced a 8 Nov 1985 release date with 700 prints, New World’s largest opening to date. According to the Jan 1986 Box, first weekend earnings from 701 theaters totaled $2.5 million. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jan 1986.
---
Daily News
7 Jul 1985
p. 3.
Daily Variety
6 Feb 1985
p. 1, 18.
Daily Variety
16 May 1985.
---
Daily Variety
28 May 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1980
p. 1, 13.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 1985
p. 3, 16.
Los Angeles Times
9 Nov 1985
Section H, p. 12.
New York Times
8 Nov 1985
p. 8.
Variety
13 Nov 1985
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Mace Neufeld Production
In association with Jadran Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Focus puller
Clapper loader
Still photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus orch
Mus orch
Synthesizer
Mus coord
Mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boomman
Cableman
Post prod supv
Dial ed
Supv sd ed
Sd asst
Foley artist
Foley artist
A.D.R. voices
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff makeup
Spec eff makeup, Cosmekinetics
Spec eff makeup, Cosmekinetics
End title concept
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod representative
Prod supv
Prod secy
Prod secy
Visual consultant
Prod auditor
Loc auditor
Management consultant
Management consultant, Hersh Panitch Associates
Unit pub
Insurance, Albert G. Ruben Company
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
"Pennsylvania 6-5000," by Carl Sigman, Jerry Gray, and William Finnegan, used by permission of CBS Robbins Catalog Inc., all rights reserved.
"Theme from 'New York, New York,'" by John Kander, and Fred Ebb., used by permission of CBS Unart Catalog Inc., all rights reserved.
"Romantic Theme," by Alfie Kabiljo.
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 November 1985
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 8 November 1985
Production Date:
29 April--early or mid June 1985
Copyright Claimant:
Balcor Film Investors & the Dow Chemical Company
Copyright Date:
19 December 1985
Copyright Number:
PA273541
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
27886
SYNOPSIS

Sensationalist journalists, Jack Harrison and Gil Turner, watch a videotape of tourists being attacked by a Frankenstein-like monster, and their boss sends them to Transylvania to investigate the story. In a quaint village, they are greeted by Mayor Lepescu. When Gil asks the townsfolk about Frankenstein, they mockingly laugh in his face. Jack and Gil find lodging at a castle, and are introduced to the peculiar staff. Sometime later, Gil visits the town newspaper to research stories on monsters and learns about a local man named Dr. Malavaqua, whose medical license was revoked. However, Jack dismisses the story as having any significance. In time, Jack takes Elizabeth Ellison, an American tourist, to dinner, but she ends their date when he tells her he is investigating Frankenstein. A female vampire attacks Gil as he sleeps, but she disappears when he screams, and Jack refuses to believe Gil’s story. Sometime later, Gil tracks down Dr. Malavaqua at a sanatorium, but he is turned away. Back at the castle, Mayor Lepescu finds the journalists’ videotape of the Frankenstein attack, and shows it to Inspector Percek, who demands the tape be destroyed. Summoning Jack and Gil to the police station, Percek warns them against pursuing the monster story, fearing it would give Transylvania a bad name. Jack and Gil are suspicious of Percek, and return to the sanatorium to speak with Dr. Malavaqua, but the Inspector is already there. Hiding from Percek, Gil sneaks onto the grounds, pretending to be a patient. Meanwhile, Percek tells Dr. Malavaqua about the journalists and asks to see the file of Kurt Hunyadi, a ... +


Sensationalist journalists, Jack Harrison and Gil Turner, watch a videotape of tourists being attacked by a Frankenstein-like monster, and their boss sends them to Transylvania to investigate the story. In a quaint village, they are greeted by Mayor Lepescu. When Gil asks the townsfolk about Frankenstein, they mockingly laugh in his face. Jack and Gil find lodging at a castle, and are introduced to the peculiar staff. Sometime later, Gil visits the town newspaper to research stories on monsters and learns about a local man named Dr. Malavaqua, whose medical license was revoked. However, Jack dismisses the story as having any significance. In time, Jack takes Elizabeth Ellison, an American tourist, to dinner, but she ends their date when he tells her he is investigating Frankenstein. A female vampire attacks Gil as he sleeps, but she disappears when he screams, and Jack refuses to believe Gil’s story. Sometime later, Gil tracks down Dr. Malavaqua at a sanatorium, but he is turned away. Back at the castle, Mayor Lepescu finds the journalists’ videotape of the Frankenstein attack, and shows it to Inspector Percek, who demands the tape be destroyed. Summoning Jack and Gil to the police station, Percek warns them against pursuing the monster story, fearing it would give Transylvania a bad name. Jack and Gil are suspicious of Percek, and return to the sanatorium to speak with Dr. Malavaqua, but the Inspector is already there. Hiding from Percek, Gil sneaks onto the grounds, pretending to be a patient. Meanwhile, Percek tells Dr. Malavaqua about the journalists and asks to see the file of Kurt Hunyadi, a dead man who fits the description of the monster on the videotape. Afterward, Gil overhears Dr. Malavaqua making a telephone call to Radu, the castle butler. When he mentions Hunyadi and a secret laboratory, Gil returns to the castle to investigate. As Jack goes on a picnic with Elizabeth Ellison and her daughter, Laura, Inspector Percek exhumes Hunyadi’s corpse and finds the coffin empty. At the castle, Gil again encounters the female vampire who woke him from his sleep the previous evening, and she introduces herself as Odette. She tries to seduce Gil, but he flees the castle to find Jack, who still refuses to believe him. Dr. Malavaqua returns to the castle laboratory, and resumes experimenting on a mummy. Elsewhere, Laura Ellison wanders into the woods and encounters the monster. When she goes missing, Elizabeth panics, and Jack and Gil search for the girl. Gil stumbles upon the monster, and runs away, while a werewolf attacks Jack. However, Gil comes to his rescue, jumping onto the creature’s back. Police arrive to search for Laura, and Inspector Percek refuses to alert the townspeople, fearing it might cause a panic. The werewolf takes Gil back to the lab, where Radu knocks him unconscious. The beast claims he was the one that was frightened by the journalists, and could not free himself from Gil’s clutches. Odette sees Gil lying unconscious, strapped to a gurney, and begs Dr. Malavaqua to free him, declaring her love for Gil. Meanwhile, Jack is imprisoned by the Inspector, and Elizabeth is furious to learn that Percek called off the search for her daughter so he can attend a festival. Elsewhere, Laura plays a friendly game of cards with the monster in a barn, and Radu arrives to take them back to the laboratory. When Jack discovers the laboratory, and finds Gil strapped to a gurney, a fight ensues. He demands to know where Laura is, and sees the monster leave with the girl once again. However, Malavaqua realizes the beast is merely taking her back to her mother, and they all pursue him into town. The sleeping girl appears dead in his arms, but as Elizabeth approaches, Laura awakens. Inspector Percek declares that the monster should be torched alive, and ties him to a post. Just then, Dr. Malavaqua arrives, and reveals that the monster is, indeed, Kurt Hunyadi, a local man who suffered deformities following an automobile accident. However, Inspector Percek insists that Hunyadi died, and that Malavaqua turned his corpse into a monster. Jack comes to Dr. Malavaqua defense, explaining that Hunyadi’s deformities made him an outcast, and the locals had him transferred to the sanatorium where Malavaqua performed reconstructive surgery on Hunyadi using nuts and bolts. He had no other way to help Hunyadi because Inspector Percek and Mayor Lepescu stole the government funds allocated for the sanatorium. When Radu arrives by horse carriage with Odette the vampire, the werewolf, and the mummy, Percek tries to incite the town against the “freaks.” Malavaqua explains that the “werewolf” is actually Lawrence Malbot, Jr., who suffers from a condition that causes abnormal hair growth, and that “the mummy” is a local woman named “Ugly Haddie” who was bandaged following plastic surgery. He removes her bandages to reveal a stunning beauty. Gil finds Odette hiding in the carriage, and asks her to remove her fangs. She tells him that she only wore them for attention, believing she is unattractive. Gil compliments her beauty and kisses her. Hunyadi, “the monster,” is unchained, and everyone celebrates. In time, Jack and Gil send the stories home to their newspaper. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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