Betsy's Wedding (1990)

R | 94 mins | Comedy | 22 June 1990

Director:

Alan Alda

Writer:

Alan Alda

Cinematographer:

Kelvin Pike

Editor:

Michael Polakow

Production Designer:

John Jay Moore
Full page view
HISTORY

End credits contain the following information: “The producers wish to thank North Carolina Film Commission; The Continental Corporation; [and] Turner Construction Company.”
       Originally titled Three Daughters, the film was scheduled to be shot at Paramount Pictures Studio, as noted in the 14 Aug 1989 Orange County Register. It became Betsy’s Wedding when Disney’s Buena Vista Pictures took over production. In the final film, there were only two daughters, not three. Filmmaker Alan Alda, an Italian-American married to a Jewish woman, said he loosely based the story on the wedding of their youngest daughter, Beatrice.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, along with the 24 Oct 1989 HR, principal photography took place 16 Oct to 30 Dec 1989, in Wilmington, NC, and New York City. However, the 20 May 1990 Chicago Tribune reported that Alda had recently called actor Joe Pesci back to Wilmington to shoot several pickup scenes, even though the film was scheduled to open a month later, on 22 Jun 1990. Pesci’s loss of twenty pounds since he left the production posed some continuity problems.
       Alda told the 26 Feb 1990 Orange County Register that weather hampered the production. Hurricane Hugo struck Wilmington on the first day of shooting, and the film was later hit with a blizzard. Snow had to be removed from some locations because the story took place in August. ... More Less

End credits contain the following information: “The producers wish to thank North Carolina Film Commission; The Continental Corporation; [and] Turner Construction Company.”
       Originally titled Three Daughters, the film was scheduled to be shot at Paramount Pictures Studio, as noted in the 14 Aug 1989 Orange County Register. It became Betsy’s Wedding when Disney’s Buena Vista Pictures took over production. In the final film, there were only two daughters, not three. Filmmaker Alan Alda, an Italian-American married to a Jewish woman, said he loosely based the story on the wedding of their youngest daughter, Beatrice.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, along with the 24 Oct 1989 HR, principal photography took place 16 Oct to 30 Dec 1989, in Wilmington, NC, and New York City. However, the 20 May 1990 Chicago Tribune reported that Alda had recently called actor Joe Pesci back to Wilmington to shoot several pickup scenes, even though the film was scheduled to open a month later, on 22 Jun 1990. Pesci’s loss of twenty pounds since he left the production posed some continuity problems.
       Alda told the 26 Feb 1990 Orange County Register that weather hampered the production. Hurricane Hugo struck Wilmington on the first day of shooting, and the film was later hit with a blizzard. Snow had to be removed from some locations because the story took place in August.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
20 May 1990
p. 5.
Daily Variety
22 Jun 1990
p. 2, 19.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 1990
p. 6, 19.
Los Angeles Times
22 Jun 1990
p. 6.
New York Times
22 Jun 1990
p. 14.
Orange County Register
14 Aug 1989
Section F, p. 4.
Orange County Register
26 Feb 1990
Section F, p. 4.
Variety
27 Jun 1990
pp. 24-25.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Touchstone Pictures Presents
In Association With Silver Screen Partners IV
A Martin Bregman Production
This motion pictures was created by Betsy's Wedding, Inc.
Distributed by Buena Vista Pictures Distribution, Inc.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, New York crew
2d 2d asst dir, New York crew
DGA trainee, New York crew
Asst unit prod mgr, New York crew
PRODUCERS
WRITER
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam® photog
Rigging gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Rigging grip
Spec stills
1st asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Best boy, New York crew
Dolly grip, New York crew
Still photog, New York crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Asst ed/Loc
Asst ed/Loc
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Asst const coord
Head painter
Leadman
Set dec, New York crew
Set dresser, New York crew
Prop master, New York crew
Asst prop master, New York crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer, New York crew
Costumer, New York crew
Asst ward, New York crew
MUSIC
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Mus mixer
Mus scoring mixer
Addl orch by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Supv Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Sd eff rec
Sd eff coord
Sd eff coord
Supv re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Model coord
Model maker
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Asst to prods, L.A.
Asst to prods, N.Y.
Asst to Mr. Alda, N.C.
Asst to Mr. Alda, N.Y.
Craft services
Craft services
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Loc mgr
Key set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Caterers
Animals furnished by
Animal handler
Prod equip
Prod coord, New York crew
Loc mgr, New York crew
Accountant, New York crew
Transportation coord, New York crew
Extras casting, New York crew
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Chapel Of Love," written by Phil Spector, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, published by Mother Bertha Music Inc. and Trio Music Co. Inc., performed by The Dixie Cups, courtesy of Sun Entertainment, by arrangement with Original Sound Entertainment
"The Stripper," written by David Rose
"Come Fly With Me," written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn, performed by Frankie Avalon, courtesy of Chancellor Records
+
SONGS
"Chapel Of Love," written by Phil Spector, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, published by Mother Bertha Music Inc. and Trio Music Co. Inc., performed by The Dixie Cups, courtesy of Sun Entertainment, by arrangement with Original Sound Entertainment
"The Stripper," written by David Rose
"Come Fly With Me," written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn, performed by Frankie Avalon, courtesy of Chancellor Records
"Moondance," written by Van Morrison
"I Only Have Eyes For You," written by Harry Warren and Al Dubin
"Evergreen," written by Barbra Streisand and Paul Williams
"Embraceable You," written by George and Ira Gershwin
"Everybody Have Fun Tonight," written by Jack Hues, Nick Feldman and Peter Wolf
"Just Give It Time," written by Dan Marfisi, performed by Jaime Segel
"The Good Life," written by David Young, Julius Robinson and Cindi Avnet-Robinson, performed by Billy Trudel
"Jamaican Love," written by Cindi Avnet-Robinson and Peter Berk, performed by Joe Pizzulo and Cathy Pinto.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Three Daughters
Release Date:
22 June 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 22 June 1990
New York opening: week of 22 June 1990
Production Date:
16 October - 30 December 1989 in Wilmington, NC, and New York City
Copyright Claimant:
Buena Vista Pictures Distribution, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 June 1990
Copyright Number:
PA467401
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo®
Color
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30595
SYNOPSIS

Building contractor Eddie Hopper awakens from a nightmare in the arms of his wife, Lola. He is convinced the day ahead will be good, but when he drives to the site of a new housing development, the builder, Dave Delahaas, tells Eddie and his crew that investors have pulled out. Eddie goes in debt for a bank loan to take over the project. Later, at a birthday party for Morris, Lola’s aging father, Eddie and Lola’s daughter, Betsy, announces that she and her fiancé, Jake Lovell, are getting married. Furthermore, though Eddie is Italian Catholic and Lola is Jewish, the young couple want a non-religious wedding. Betsy’s older sister, Connie, an unmarried policewoman, congratulates them. Oscar Henner, the slumlord husband of Lola’s sister, Gloria, offers the use of one of his apartments at a reduced rent. Despite being in debt, Eddie declares he will give his daughter a big wedding, with light touches of Italian and Jewish tradition. In the kitchen, Gloria confesses to her sister Lola that she secretly buys property that Oscar plans to buy, so she can resell to him at a higher price and put the money into a divorce fund. Later, at a restaurant dinner party, Jake’s wealthy Protestant parents, Henry and Nancy Lovell, offer to pay for an expensive wedding at New York City’s Plaza Hotel and a European honeymoon. However, Eddie insists that, as the bride’s father, he will pay. The next day, Eddie visits Oscar’s office for a $30,000 loan, using his housing project as collateral. Oscar agrees, but introduces him to Georgie, an Italian American “business associate.” Georgie is uninterested in investing, but assigns his nephew Stevie Dee, a gangster ... +


Building contractor Eddie Hopper awakens from a nightmare in the arms of his wife, Lola. He is convinced the day ahead will be good, but when he drives to the site of a new housing development, the builder, Dave Delahaas, tells Eddie and his crew that investors have pulled out. Eddie goes in debt for a bank loan to take over the project. Later, at a birthday party for Morris, Lola’s aging father, Eddie and Lola’s daughter, Betsy, announces that she and her fiancé, Jake Lovell, are getting married. Furthermore, though Eddie is Italian Catholic and Lola is Jewish, the young couple want a non-religious wedding. Betsy’s older sister, Connie, an unmarried policewoman, congratulates them. Oscar Henner, the slumlord husband of Lola’s sister, Gloria, offers the use of one of his apartments at a reduced rent. Despite being in debt, Eddie declares he will give his daughter a big wedding, with light touches of Italian and Jewish tradition. In the kitchen, Gloria confesses to her sister Lola that she secretly buys property that Oscar plans to buy, so she can resell to him at a higher price and put the money into a divorce fund. Later, at a restaurant dinner party, Jake’s wealthy Protestant parents, Henry and Nancy Lovell, offer to pay for an expensive wedding at New York City’s Plaza Hotel and a European honeymoon. However, Eddie insists that, as the bride’s father, he will pay. The next day, Eddie visits Oscar’s office for a $30,000 loan, using his housing project as collateral. Oscar agrees, but introduces him to Georgie, an Italian American “business associate.” Georgie is uninterested in investing, but assigns his nephew Stevie Dee, a gangster wannabe who needs a job, for Oscar to put in charge of security at the construction site. When Connie arrives on a visit to see her father, Stevie falls in love at first sight and convinces Uncle Georgie that Eddie’s project would be a good investment. Georgie tells Oscar he wants to invest $300,000, and Oscar in turn convinces Eddie to accept Georgie as a partner, even though Eddie knows that Georgie is a mobster. Oscar also receives $3,000 from Eddie to rent a wedding tent. Meanwhile, Betsy acquiesces to her mother’s wish that she wear a traditional wedding gown, even though Betsy is a designer with an unconventional fashion sense. At Betsy’s dress fitting, Connie cries, because in both Italian and Jewish families the eldest daughter is expected to marry first. Meanwhile, Oscar telephones Gloria from his office to tell her he will miss dinner because he has a meeting with the owner of a fish market he wants to buy, but in fact he has sex with his secretary, Joy. Later that night, as Oscar discusses his plans for buying the fish market, Gloria secretly writes down the highest bid he is willing to offer. The next evening, when the Lovells take Jake and Betsy to the opera, they are shocked at Betsy’s homemade dress, and Jake confides to Betsy that she should be less creative. Betsy angrily accuses Jake of paying too much attention to what other people think. The next day, Lola tells Betsy that she and Eddie had the same problems when they married, because they had to deal with two traditional but very different families. “It’s fun to be different,” Lola counsels her daughter. Later, however, Eddie and Lola have misgivings about their prospective in-laws. Besides being too rich, the Lovells have “no texture,” no discernable ethnic background. Meanwhile, Stevie courts Connie in an awkward, Old World manner, treating her like an Italian princess. Elsewhere, Betsy and Jake negotiate with her mother’s rabbi on what he can say at the wedding. They agree to stomp on a glass, a Jewish tradition, but only if the rabbi explains that it represents a break from the past, not “the destruction of the Temple” in Jerusalem 1,900 years earlier. At Oscar’s office, Joy wants to be part of Betsy’s wedding, but he warns it would be a bad idea. At the housing site, Eddie has problems with his new, lazy work crew and the absentee “consultant” Georgie has brought into the project. He confides to Oscar that Georgie might be laundering money. The three men meet at an Italian restaurant, where Georgie is curious why Eddie changed his Italian name to Hopper. Eddie explains that his salesman father needed an easy-to-remember American name. When Eddie suggests he is not happy with their arrangement, Georgie makes a veiled threat about unhappy people jumping out of windows. Georgie’s armed bodyguard, Anselmo, sits at the next table. As they leave the restaurant, gangsters in a passing car spray Anselmo and Georgie with machine-gun fire and chase them in a running gun battle to a taxicab company Georgie owns. The next day, at the construction site, Eddie asks Stevie’s advice on how to deal with Georgie, and Stevie in turn asks permission to court Connie. On the day of the wedding, Betsy decides to change her dress. Outside her door, following the tradition of the groom not seeing the bride until the wedding, Jake tells Betsy he is sorry for trying to change her, because it was her individuality that made him love her in the first place. As the wedding begins under the tent, rain starts falling. Georgie and Stevie arrive uninvited, and Oscar convinces Eddie to accommodate them. Betsy appears in her redesigned white dress, shocking Jake’s parents, but Jake himself smiles as Betsy approaches. The wedding goes smoothly, Jake stomps on a glass, and everyone seems happy. During the wedding reception, Joy arrives and Gloria graciously allows her to sit at her table, despite Oscar’s discomfort. As Joy accepts a dance from one of the other guests, Gloria quietly confesses to Oscar that it was her company that sold him the fish market; she knew what to pay the original owner because she knew how high Oscar would bid. When he accuses her of dishonesty, Gloria reminds him that he cheated on her with Joy and cheated on Eddie by renting a cheap tent, which at that moment is leaking from the rain. As Stevie dances with Connie, she confesses she is attracted to him, but fears their backgrounds are too different. Later, Stevie tells Eddie how to talk to Georgie in a way that shows respect and lets Georgie back out of the deal. Stevie also tells Eddie he loves Connie and plans to apply to the police academy. As water continues pouring into the party, Eddie complains to Oscar that he should have rented a better one for $3,000, and Georgie is offended because he got the tent for free at Oscar’s request. When Eddie repeats the words that Stevie told him, Georgie ends their partnership and leaves. Instead of ruining the party, the flood turns it into a barefoot celebration. Eddie realizes he can let go of Betsy, and when he sees Stevie and Connie kissing, he tells his wife, “Please let them elope.” Everyone splashes in the water as they dance to “Hava Nagila.”
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.