Child's Play 2 (1990)

R | 84 mins | Horror | 9 November 1990

Directors:

John Lafia, Kevin Yagher

Writer:

Don Mancini

Producer:

David Kirschner

Cinematographer:

Stefan Czapsky

Production Designer:

Ivo Cristante

Production Company:

Living Doll Productions
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HISTORY

When the original Child’s Play (1988, see entry) grossed over $33 million at the box office and sold 200,000 video cassettes, distributor MGM-United Artists ordered a sequel, according to the 4 Aug 1989 DV and 21 Aug 1989 LAT. However, after Qintex Entertainment, an Australian company, purchased United Artists from MGM/UA Communications in 1989 and opted to release only “prestigious” films, it canceled Child’s Play 2, which was then in pre-production. Alliance for Survivalival and other child advocacy groups applauded the decision, claiming that the hit film’s “exploitative and violent nature” was unhealthy, the 22 Aug 1989 HR noted. The 28 Mar 1990 Var reported that Universal Pictures acquired the sequel from UA.
       Child Play 2 began filming 6 Nov 1989 at Universal Studios, with a budget of $12 million, according to the 4 Dec 1989 HR. On 1 Dec 1989, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) began picketing the film, demanding that the producers, Living Doll Productions, stop using non-union technicians. The crew voted “overwhelmingly” to be represented by the IATSE, the 4 Jan 1990 DV reported. The union contract took effect 8 Jan 1990, with eleven days remaining on the film’s fifty-five-day shooting schedule.
       Studio production notes in AMPAS library files reveal that the production used three separate dolls. A full-body, standing “Chucky,” controlled by cables, required nine puppeteers with joysticks “working in perfect synchronicity” from various off-screen “hiding places” or beneath the floor. The cables ran through one foot, which was grounded. The other foot was mobile. When Chucky talked, his face was filmed at ... More Less

When the original Child’s Play (1988, see entry) grossed over $33 million at the box office and sold 200,000 video cassettes, distributor MGM-United Artists ordered a sequel, according to the 4 Aug 1989 DV and 21 Aug 1989 LAT. However, after Qintex Entertainment, an Australian company, purchased United Artists from MGM/UA Communications in 1989 and opted to release only “prestigious” films, it canceled Child’s Play 2, which was then in pre-production. Alliance for Survivalival and other child advocacy groups applauded the decision, claiming that the hit film’s “exploitative and violent nature” was unhealthy, the 22 Aug 1989 HR noted. The 28 Mar 1990 Var reported that Universal Pictures acquired the sequel from UA.
       Child Play 2 began filming 6 Nov 1989 at Universal Studios, with a budget of $12 million, according to the 4 Dec 1989 HR. On 1 Dec 1989, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) began picketing the film, demanding that the producers, Living Doll Productions, stop using non-union technicians. The crew voted “overwhelmingly” to be represented by the IATSE, the 4 Jan 1990 DV reported. The union contract took effect 8 Jan 1990, with eleven days remaining on the film’s fifty-five-day shooting schedule.
       Studio production notes in AMPAS library files reveal that the production used three separate dolls. A full-body, standing “Chucky,” controlled by cables, required nine puppeteers with joysticks “working in perfect synchronicity” from various off-screen “hiding places” or beneath the floor. The cables ran through one foot, which was grounded. The other foot was mobile. When Chucky talked, his face was filmed at eighteen frames a second instead of the usual twenty-four, so that second unit director and special effects manager Kevin Yagher and his crew had “a little more time to sync up our facial movements to the words.” A second “servo motor doll” was operated by remote control, and a third was used only for upper body shots.
       A 900-telephone-number promotion for the movie allowed fans to hear the voice of “Chucky,” the 16 Nov 1990 DV reported. The number received 40,000 calls in one month.
       Child’s Play 2 grossed $10.7 million during its opening weekend, the 14 Nov 1990 HR and 19 Nov 1990 Var reported. The Jan 1991 Box noted, however, that sales subsequently dropped and the film reached only a $23.1 million gross by the end of its first month of release. Regardless, producers immediately began work on a second sequel, Child’s Play 3 (1991, see entry), according to the 15 Nov 1990 HR. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jan 1991.
---
Daily Variety
4 Aug 1989
p. 25.
Daily Variety
9 Aug 1989
p. 22.
Daily Variety
4 Jan 1990
p. 1, 42.
Daily Variety
16 Nov 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1989
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 1990
p. 9, 55.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
21 Aug 1989
Section VI, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
9 Nov 1990
Section F, p. 8.
New York Times
9 Nov 1990
p. 16.
Variety
10 Jan 1990
p. 12.
Variety
28 Mar 1990
p. 25.
Variety
12 Nov 1990
p. 61.
Variety
19 Nov 1990
p. 103.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Universal Pictures Presents
A David Kirschner Production
A John Lafia Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, Addl photog
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Film loader
Steadicam op
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst lighting tech
Asst lighting tech
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Video assist op
Video assist op
Puppet video op
Photographic backgrounds by
Photographic backgrounds by
Cam equip supplied by
Optical cam, Optical & Vista Vision plates, Apogee
Optical cam asst, Optical & Vista Vision plates, A
Cam op, Optical & Vista Vision plates, Apogee Prod
Still photog, Optical & Vista Vision plates, Apoge
Dir of photog, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
Dir of photog, Addl photog
1st asst cam, Addl photog
2d asst cam, Addl photog
Video asst, Addl photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
Apprentice ed
Ed supv, Optical & Vista Vision plates, Apogee Pro
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Propmaker foreman
Paint foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Key costumer
Key costumer
Chucky costumer, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Producti
MUSIC
Mus cond & orch by
Addl orch
Scoring mixer
Mus clearance by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley rec
ADR ed
Loop group
ADR mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer, Addl photog
VISUAL EFFECTS
Chucky doll created by
Chucky des and eng by
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Chucky puppeteer
Studio mgr, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Productions,
Studio tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Productions,
Studio tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Productions,
Studio tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Productions,
Studio tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Productions,
Studio tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Productions,
Mechanical tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Producti
Mechanical tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Producti
Mechanical tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Producti
Mechanical tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Producti
Mechanical tech, Chucky eff, Kevin Yagher Producti
Mechanical eff
Mechanical eff coord, Mechanical eff, Image Engine
On-set eff crew, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering
On-set eff crew, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering
On-set eff crew, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering
On-set eff crew, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering
On-set eff crew, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering
On-set eff crew, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering
Mechanical fabrication crew, Mechanical eff, Image
Mechanical fabrication crew, Mechanical eff, Image
Mechanical fabrication crew, Mechanical eff, Image
Mechanical fabrication crew, Mechanical eff, Image
Mechanical fabrication crew, Mechanical eff, Image
Mechanical fabrication crew, Mechanical eff, Image
Mechanical fabrication crew, Mechanical eff, Image
Mechanical fabrication crew, Mechanical eff, Image
Eff runner, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering, Inc
Eff runner, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering, Inc
Project coord, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering,
Image gen mgr, Mechanical eff, Image Engineering,
Robotic consultant
Title des
Optical & Vista Vision plates
Optical supv, Optical & Vista Vision plates, Apoge
Eff prod, Optical & Vista Vision plates, Apogee Pr
Eff coord, Optical & Vista Vision plates, Apogee P
MAKEUP
Key makeup
Key hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod accountant
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst prod coord
Asst to Mr. Kirschner
Asst to Mr. Lafia
Asst accountant
Casting assoc
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Teacher
First aid
Unit pub
Craft service
Craft service
Extras casting
Extras casting
Projection equip
Prod coord, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Prod asst, 2d unit
Scr supv, Addl photog
Prod asst, Addl photog
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
"Andy" photo double
ANIMATION
Anim supv, Optical & Vista Vision plates, Apogee P
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Process compositing by
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Don Mancini.
AUTHOR
SONGS
"New China," written and performed by Vox Populi International, produced by John Stanley.
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
9 November 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 9 November 1990
New York opening: week of 9 November 1990
Production Date:
6 November 1989--February 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
9 January 1991
Copyright Number:
PA496404
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
84
Length(in feet):
7,588
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30593
SYNOPSIS

Technicians at Play Pals Toys, the Chicago, Illinois-based manufacturer of Good Guy dolls for boys, scrape and clean the “Chucky” doll that was partly incinerated by its young owner, Andy Barclay. They reassemble the doll with replacement parts and place new batteries inside. Mr. Sullivan, the company’s chief executive officer, arrives at the factory for a stockholders’ meeting and is met by a staffer named Mattson. Concerned about the tabloids’ negative news coverage of the Barclay case, Sullivan wonders if a disgruntled employee tampered with the doll. Mattson tells him it is being restored, so that he can calm stockholders by showing them the Barclay boy’s innocent-looking Good Guy. As Sullivan and Mattson watch a technician replace the doll’s eyes, the employee is electrocuted and killed. Sullivan orders a cover-up and tells Mattson to get rid of the doll. Meanwhile, a child psychologist at the Midtown Children’s Crisis Center talks with Andy Barclay about Chucky. The boy tells him that when police fatally shot “Lakeshore Strangler” Charles Lee Ray, the serial killer used his voodoo knowledge to transfer his soul to Chucky. Then, realizing he was trapped inside a doll, Ray tried to take over Andy’s body. The doctor thinks the eight-year-old’s story is only a scary dream. Since Andy’s mother has been placed in a mental hospital, social worker Grace Poole arranges for the boy to be placed with foster parents, Phil and Joanne Simpson. The couple takes him to their large home. They warn Andy not to touch their heirlooms, especially Joanne’s porcelain figurines, but offer him a room full of toys, including a Good Guy doll just like Chucky, whose name is “Tommy.” As Andy explores ... +


Technicians at Play Pals Toys, the Chicago, Illinois-based manufacturer of Good Guy dolls for boys, scrape and clean the “Chucky” doll that was partly incinerated by its young owner, Andy Barclay. They reassemble the doll with replacement parts and place new batteries inside. Mr. Sullivan, the company’s chief executive officer, arrives at the factory for a stockholders’ meeting and is met by a staffer named Mattson. Concerned about the tabloids’ negative news coverage of the Barclay case, Sullivan wonders if a disgruntled employee tampered with the doll. Mattson tells him it is being restored, so that he can calm stockholders by showing them the Barclay boy’s innocent-looking Good Guy. As Sullivan and Mattson watch a technician replace the doll’s eyes, the employee is electrocuted and killed. Sullivan orders a cover-up and tells Mattson to get rid of the doll. Meanwhile, a child psychologist at the Midtown Children’s Crisis Center talks with Andy Barclay about Chucky. The boy tells him that when police fatally shot “Lakeshore Strangler” Charles Lee Ray, the serial killer used his voodoo knowledge to transfer his soul to Chucky. Then, realizing he was trapped inside a doll, Ray tried to take over Andy’s body. The doctor thinks the eight-year-old’s story is only a scary dream. Since Andy’s mother has been placed in a mental hospital, social worker Grace Poole arranges for the boy to be placed with foster parents, Phil and Joanne Simpson. The couple takes him to their large home. They warn Andy not to touch their heirlooms, especially Joanne’s porcelain figurines, but offer him a room full of toys, including a Good Guy doll just like Chucky, whose name is “Tommy.” As Andy explores the house, he meets another child, Kyle, a cynical seventeen-year-old girl who has spent her life in foster homes. Meanwhile, Mattson tosses Chucky into the back seat of his car and drives home. While Mattson stops at a liquor store, Chucky uses the car phone to call Grace Poole, identifies himself as Andy’s uncle, and learns the boy’s new address. When Mattson gets back in the car, Chucky puts a toy gun to his head and orders him to drive near the Simpson residence. Tying Mattson’s hands behind the seat, Chucky puts a plastic bag over his head and suffocates him. Entering the Simpson house, Chucky smashes the Tommy doll’s face with one of Joanne’s prized figurines and buries him under a swing in the back yard. In the morning, when the Simpsons find the broken figurine, they confine both Andy and Kyle to the house despite the youngsters’ denials. Phil expresses second thoughts about taking in the “troubled boy,” but Joanne defends him. That night, when Andy wakens, he is tied to the bed, and Chucky chants an incantation to transfer Ray’s soul into his body. Suddenly, Kyle, who sneaked out to see her boyfriend, climbs through Andy’s window, and Chucky plays “dead.” As Kyle unties Andy, Phil Simpson comes into the room. When the boy insists the doll tied him up, Phil dismisses his story and tosses it into the basement. Chucky’s nose bleeds, a sign that he is turning human, a fate that Charles Lee Ray wants to avoid. The next morning, as Andy and Kyle board a school bus, Chucky climbs beneath it. At school, the doll sneaks into an empty classroom during recess and hides in a cabinet. Later, at the end of the class, the teacher, Miss Kettlewell, sees an obscenity written on Andy’s paper and holds the boy after the other pupils leave. Seeing Chucky, she tosses the doll into a cloak room and locks the door, then goes to the principal’s office to call Joanne Simpson. Andy escapes out a window. When Miss Kettlewell returns, she hears the cloak room doorknob rattle. As she opens the door, Chucky stabs her, then beats her to death with a yard stick. At home, Andy tells his foster parent, Phil, the doll was the one that wrote the offensive note to his teacher, but when Phil unlocks the basement door, Chucky lies at the bottom of the stairs where Phil tossed him the night before. Kyle comforts the boy by telling him foster children need to learn to depend on themselves. Later, Andy takes a battery-powered carving knife and goes into the basement, but Chucky evades him. When Phil comes downstairs, Chucky trips him, sending him head-first onto the concrete floor. Distraught over Phil’s death, Joanne returns Andy to the children’s center, and Kyle puts the doll in an outside trash can. Sitting on the backyard swing, she accidentally kicks up the broken-faced Tommy doll and realizes Andy was right about Chucky. Returning to the trash can, she finds it empty. Kyle gets a kitchen knife, goes upstairs, and finds Joanne dead. Chucky suddenly jumps her. Grabbing Kyle’s knife and putting it to her throat, Chucky orders her to drive him to the children’s center. A policeman pulls Kyle over for speeding, but when he recognizes the Good Guy doll, he softens and lets her go. At the center, Grace Poole hears the fire alarm bell and rallies the children to leave, then realizes it is a false alarm when she sees Kyle with the doll. Despite Andy’s warning, Grace tries to grab Chucky, but he stabs her, pushes Kyle into the hallway, and locks the office door. With his knife to Andy’s throat, Chucky orders him to escape out a window and climb into the back of a Chicago Sun-Times newspaper delivery truck. Kyle follows in the Simpsons’ car and runs the truck off the road near the Play Pals Toys factory. Andy runs into the facility with Chucky on his back. Surrounded by piles of Good Guy boxes, Chucky knocks the boy unconscious and chants voodoo incantations, but Andy awakens and the doll’s nose starts to bleed. Kyle pushes a stack of boxed dolls onto Chucky, grabs Andy, and runs. When she drops a gate on Chucky’s wrist and traps him, the doll pulls off its hand and jams the butt of the knife into the wrist socket. He stabs a technician, who falls onto an assembly line belt and gets plastic eyeballs stuffed into his sockets. Kyle hits a button that sends Chucky into a heating unit that partially melts him, but Chucky continues the chase until Andy opens a valve that dumps liquid plastic on him. When Kyle stuffs a broken air hose into Chucky’s mouth, the doll expands and explodes. Kyle and Andy walk away. He asks where they are going to live, but Kyle says she has no idea. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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