Aloha Summer (1988)

PG | 97 mins | Romantic comedy | 26 February 1988

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HISTORY

The following dedication is presented before the end credits: “Aloha Summer is dedicated to the memory of the real Angelo.” End credits state: “We wish to thank the people of Hawaii for inspiring ‘Aloha Summer’ and the following friends for their assistance: Richard Kelley and the Outrigger Hotels; American Hawaii Cruises; the Halekulani Hotel; the Tahitian Lani Hotel; Ala Moana Americana Hotel; After Six Formal Wear; Alfred Angelo; Roxanne; Scott Shoe Co.; Iolani Sportwear; Hans Rosendal; Hawaii Film Commission.”
       The film begins with the following voice-over narration by actor Chris Makepeace, performing the character “Mike,” as he looks through a photograph album: “The guys. By the end of the summer even Dad was calling us the Salty Six…It all happened in ’59. Hawaii became the fiftieth state, and the guys, we all learned what the spirit of Aloha really means.” During the film, specific dates are listed onscreen when a page of the album is turned: 20 Jun 1959; 9 Jul 1959; 2 Aug 1959; 21 Aug 1959; and 8 Sep 1959.
       Referring to the film by its working title, Hanauma Bay, DV production charts on 24 Aug 1984 reported that principal photography began 13 Aug 1984 in Honolulu, HI. According to studio production notes in AMPAS library file and a 1 Dec 1987 HR announcement, the film’s worldwide distribution rights were obtained by Spectrafilm, with a projected release date of Feb 1988.
       Although onscreen credits list actress Tia Carrere in the role of “Lani,” news items in the 21 Aug 1984 HR and 24 Aug 1984 ... More Less

The following dedication is presented before the end credits: “Aloha Summer is dedicated to the memory of the real Angelo.” End credits state: “We wish to thank the people of Hawaii for inspiring ‘Aloha Summer’ and the following friends for their assistance: Richard Kelley and the Outrigger Hotels; American Hawaii Cruises; the Halekulani Hotel; the Tahitian Lani Hotel; Ala Moana Americana Hotel; After Six Formal Wear; Alfred Angelo; Roxanne; Scott Shoe Co.; Iolani Sportwear; Hans Rosendal; Hawaii Film Commission.”
       The film begins with the following voice-over narration by actor Chris Makepeace, performing the character “Mike,” as he looks through a photograph album: “The guys. By the end of the summer even Dad was calling us the Salty Six…It all happened in ’59. Hawaii became the fiftieth state, and the guys, we all learned what the spirit of Aloha really means.” During the film, specific dates are listed onscreen when a page of the album is turned: 20 Jun 1959; 9 Jul 1959; 2 Aug 1959; 21 Aug 1959; and 8 Sep 1959.
       Referring to the film by its working title, Hanauma Bay, DV production charts on 24 Aug 1984 reported that principal photography began 13 Aug 1984 in Honolulu, HI. According to studio production notes in AMPAS library file and a 1 Dec 1987 HR announcement, the film’s worldwide distribution rights were obtained by Spectrafilm, with a projected release date of Feb 1988.
       Although onscreen credits list actress Tia Carrere in the role of “Lani,” news items in the 21 Aug 1984 HR and 24 Aug 1984 DV, published during production, referred to the actress by her real name, Althea Janairo. While production notes claimed that the film was Carrere’s feature film debut, she was featured in the 1987 Canadian picture, Zombie Nightmare. Professional and historical innovator of the sport of surfing, Rabbit Kekai, was reportedly actor Scott Nakagawa’s surfing double, but he is credited onscreen as Surfing Technical Advisor.
       The 22 Feb 1988 DV review reported that cameramen captured the hurricane sequences by filming on jet skis at Sunset Beach, HI. The scenes were shot more than four months after principal photography had officially ended.
       News items in the 22 Jun 1988 Var and 24 Jun 1988 HR mentioned that the film was to be presented at “Hawaii’s three-day State Day Events” at the World Expo 88 in Brisbane, Australia, on 26 Jun 1988. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Aug 1984
p. 12.
Daily Variety
31 Aug 1984
p. 12.
Daily Variety
22 Feb 1988
p. 3, 6.
Daily Variety
24 Feb 1988
p. 12.
Daily Variety
16 Jun 1988
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 1988
p. 3, 21.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Mar 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jun 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Feb 1988
p. 12.
New York Times
26 Feb 1988
p. 8.
Variety
24 Feb 1988
p. 12.
Variety
22 Jun 1988
p. 7.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Addl photog
Cam op
Cam op
Cam op
1st cam asst
1st cam asst
1st cam asst
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
2d cam asst
Spec water photog
Spec water photog
Spec water photog
Lighting consultant
Rigging gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Key grip
Key grip
Grip
Jet-Cam
Still photog
Projectionist
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Addl ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative ed
Negative ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Leadman
Swing man
Prop master
Prop master
Prop master
Prop asst
Prop asst
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Ward supv
Ward asst
Ward asst
Ward apprentice
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus comp
Mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Utility sd
Utility sd
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Addl sd ef
Addl sd ef
Asst sd ed
ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Post prod sd
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles & opt eff
DANCE
Spec kendo choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup asst
Makeup asst
Makeup asst
Makeup asst
Makeup asst
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Asst hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Prod coord
Surfing tech adv
Water safety coord
Loc coord
Loc coord
Loc asst
Loc asst
Scr supv
Scr supv
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod secy
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Craft services
Craft services
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Unit pub
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Surfing double
Surfing double
Surfing double
Surfing double
Surfing double
Surfing double
Surfing double
Surfing double
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col
SOURCES
MUSIC
“Koni Koni,” written by Danny K. Stewart, performed by the Royal Tahitians, courtesy of Criterion Music Corporation
“Bustin’ Surfboards,” written by Paul Buff, performed the Bongo Teens, courtesy of Original Sound Entertainment
“Walk Don’t Run,” written by Johnny Smith, published by Forshay Music, Inc., performed by The Ventures, courtesy of EMI-Manhattan Records
+
MUSIC
“Koni Koni,” written by Danny K. Stewart, performed by the Royal Tahitians, courtesy of Criterion Music Corporation
“Bustin’ Surfboards,” written by Paul Buff, performed the Bongo Teens, courtesy of Original Sound Entertainment
“Walk Don’t Run,” written by Johnny Smith, published by Forshay Music, Inc., performed by The Ventures, courtesy of EMI-Manhattan Records
“Deep Purple,” written by Peter De Rose, published by SBK Robbins Catalog, Inc., performed by the Del Courtney Orchestra.
+
SONGS
“Beyond the Sea,” written by Charles Trenet and Jack Lawrence, published by T. B. Harms Co., MPL Communications, Inc and France Music Corp., performed by Bobby Darin, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“You’re So Fine,” written by Lance Finney, Robert West, and Willie Schofield, published by C & B West Publishing Co., performed by the Falcons, courtesy of EMI – Manhattan Records
“Lei Momi, Lei Momi Lani,” written by Alvin K. Isaacs, published by Criterion Music Corporation, performed by Blaine Kia, Warren Fabro and Andy Bumatai
+
SONGS
“Beyond the Sea,” written by Charles Trenet and Jack Lawrence, published by T. B. Harms Co., MPL Communications, Inc and France Music Corp., performed by Bobby Darin, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“You’re So Fine,” written by Lance Finney, Robert West, and Willie Schofield, published by C & B West Publishing Co., performed by the Falcons, courtesy of EMI – Manhattan Records
“Lei Momi, Lei Momi Lani,” written by Alvin K. Isaacs, published by Criterion Music Corporation, performed by Blaine Kia, Warren Fabro and Andy Bumatai
“Little Darlin,” written by Maurice Williams, published by Excellorec Music, performed by the Salty Six
“Tequila,” written by Chuck Rio, published by Powerforce Music and Gulfstar Music, performed by Stewart Levin and Snuffy Walden
“Yakety Yak,” written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, published by Chappell-Intersong Music Co., performed by the Coasters, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Purple People Eater,” written and performed by Sheb Wooley, courtesy of Channel Music Co.
“Nel Blu Dipinto Di Blu,” written by Domenico Modugno and F. Migliacci, published by Edizioni Curci, performed by Domenico Modugno, courtesy of Nuova Fonit Cetra
“Splish Splash,” written by Bobby Darin and Murray Kaufman, published by Hudson Bay Music and SBK Robbins Catalog, Inc., performed by Bobby Darin, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Burning Bridges,” written by Walter Scott, published by Sage and Sand Music, performed by Jack Scott, courtesy of Capitol Records
“Momma Stole The Chicken,” written by Billy Bland, published by Maureen Music, Inc., performed by Billy Bland, courtesy of Old Town Records
“I Only Have Eyes For You,” written by Harry Warren and Al Dubin, published by Warner-Chappell Music, performed by the Flamingos, courtesy of ABZ Music Corp.
“Stairway To The Stars,” written by Mitchell Parish, Matt Malneck and Frank Signorelli, published by SBK Robbins Catalog, Inc., performed by the Del Courtney Orchestra
“Elmer’s Tune,” written by Elmer W. Albrecht, Sammy Gallop and Dick Jurgens, published by SBK Robbins Catalog, Inc., performed by the Del Courtney Orchestra
“You’re Driving Me Crazy,” written by Walter Donaldson, published by Donaldson Publishing Co. and Bregman, Vocco and Cohn, Inc., performed by the Del Courtney Orchestra
“I Can’t Get Started,” written by Ira Gershwin and Vernon Duke, published by Chappell-Intersong Music Co., performed by Vic Leon and the Del Courtney Orchestra
“Mapuana,” written by Lani Sang, published by Criterion Music Corporation, performed by Sonny Kamahele
“Rockin’ Robin,” written by Jimmie Thomas, published by Recordo Music Publishers, performed by Bobby Day, courtesy of Original Sound Entertainment
“Ke Kali Nei Au,” written by Charles E. King, published by MCA Music Publishing
“Kuu Ipo Ona Ona,” written by Maddy Lam, published by Criterion Music Corporation, performed by Pau Almeida, courtesy of Crescendo Records
“In The Still Of The Nite,” written by Frederick Parris, published by LLEE Corp., performed by The Five Satins, courtesy of Arista Records
“Since I Don’t Have You,” written by Joseph Rock, Lennie Martin, James Beaumont, Janet Vogel, Joseph Verscharen, Walter Lester, John Taylor, published by Southern Music Publishing Co., Inc. on behalf of Bonnyview Music Corp., courtesy of Original Sound Entertainment
“We Belong Together,” written by Robert Carr, Johnny Mitchell and S. Weiss, published by ABZ Music Corp. and Maureen Music, Inc., performed by Robert and Johnny, courtesy of Old Town Records
“One Summer Night,” written by Danny Webb, published by Melody Lane Publications, Inc., performed by the Danleers, courtesy of PolyGram Records, Inc.
“White Ginger Blossoms,” written by Andy Anderson, published by Bibo Music Publishers, performed by Haunani Kahalewai, courtesy of Crescendo Records
“A Thousand Miles Away,” written by J. Sheppard and W. H. Miller, performed by The Heartbeats, courtesy of ABZ Music Corp.
“Dream Lover,” written and performed Bobby Darin, published by Screen Gems-EMI Music and Hudson Bay Music, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp. by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Hanauma Bay
Release Date:
26 February 1988
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Los Angeles: 22 February 1988
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 February 1988
Production Date:
began 13 August 1984 in Honolulu, Hawaii
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28855
SYNOPSIS

On 20 June 1959, Mike Tognetti and his parents, Angelo and Pat, fly to Honolulu, Hawaii, for summer vacation. Upon landing, the family is chauffeured to a garish motel and Mike heads to the beach. Meanwhile, Kenzo Konishi and his parents arrive in Honolulu from Kyoto, Japan, and they drive to the home of their relatives, the Tanakas. Elsewhere, Chuck Granville steps off a cruise ship, sees a Hawaiian woman, Lani, and kisses her as she places a strand of flowers around his neck. His sister, Amanda, pulls him away to join their parents. That afternoon at the beach, Chuck befriends Mike, and they go flirt with some girls. By sundown, Mike and Chuck see a bonfire and meet a group of locals including Jerry, who introduces them to his brother, Kilarney. The next day, Jerry gives the boys surf lessons, but Chuck becomes frustrated and swims back to shore. Nearby, Kenzo learns to surf with his cousin, Scott Tanaka, and crashes into Mike. After apologizing, the boys join forces in their lessons. Sometime later, Kenzo meets his father, Yukinaga Konishi, to practice the Japanese swordsmanship, kendo. Three weeks later, on 9 July 1959, Mike’s father, Angelo, makes derogatory comments about Mike’s new friends, and the boy points out that his Italian grandparents were also victims of prejudicial sterotypes. As Angelo yells at his son for being disrespectful, Mike joins his friends surfing. Elsewhere, Lani’s brother, Kimo, complains that tourists are ruining Hawaii, and she accuses him of bigotry. Back at the beach, Jerry and Kilarney invite Chuck and Mike to dive for coins thrown ... +


On 20 June 1959, Mike Tognetti and his parents, Angelo and Pat, fly to Honolulu, Hawaii, for summer vacation. Upon landing, the family is chauffeured to a garish motel and Mike heads to the beach. Meanwhile, Kenzo Konishi and his parents arrive in Honolulu from Kyoto, Japan, and they drive to the home of their relatives, the Tanakas. Elsewhere, Chuck Granville steps off a cruise ship, sees a Hawaiian woman, Lani, and kisses her as she places a strand of flowers around his neck. His sister, Amanda, pulls him away to join their parents. That afternoon at the beach, Chuck befriends Mike, and they go flirt with some girls. By sundown, Mike and Chuck see a bonfire and meet a group of locals including Jerry, who introduces them to his brother, Kilarney. The next day, Jerry gives the boys surf lessons, but Chuck becomes frustrated and swims back to shore. Nearby, Kenzo learns to surf with his cousin, Scott Tanaka, and crashes into Mike. After apologizing, the boys join forces in their lessons. Sometime later, Kenzo meets his father, Yukinaga Konishi, to practice the Japanese swordsmanship, kendo. Three weeks later, on 9 July 1959, Mike’s father, Angelo, makes derogatory comments about Mike’s new friends, and the boy points out that his Italian grandparents were also victims of prejudicial sterotypes. As Angelo yells at his son for being disrespectful, Mike joins his friends surfing. Elsewhere, Lani’s brother, Kimo, complains that tourists are ruining Hawaii, and she accuses him of bigotry. Back at the beach, Jerry and Kilarney invite Chuck and Mike to dive for coins thrown by cruise ship passengers, but when they meet up with Kimo, he is upset by the inclusion of the mainlanders. As they swim to gather coins, Chuck sees Lani and reveals that he kissed her, inadvertently prompting Kimo to punch him. Jerry explains that Lani is Kimo’s sister. Later that evening, Mike arrives at Chuck’s hotel and they become intoxicated before attending a dance. Meanwhile, cousins Scott and Kenzo get ready for the dance, and Kenzo shows off his father’s two ceremonial swords, explaining that one of the swords will be his when he proves himself worthy. Elsewhere, at a bar, Kilarney comments on a pretty woman, and a naval sailor warns him not to pursue white girls. In response, Kilarney punches him, and a fight ensues. Later, at the dance, Chuck drunkenly introduces Mike to his sister, Amanda, but she rejects his flirtations. Dejected, Mike goes outside, followed by Chuck, Kenzo, Scott, and Jerry. There, Kilarney limps towards his friends and tells them about his fight. When Jerry decides to retaliate, Chuck warns them they will be arrested, and Kenzo refuses to fight without honor. However, Mike, Kilarney, Kimo, and Jerry arrive at a park one hour later to confront a group of sailors. During the brawl, Chuck, Kenzo, and Scott join in, despite their previous reservations, and the sailors run away defeated. On 2 August 1959, as the summer holiday continues, Mike and Chuck’s families attend a formal dance. When Chuck’s father, Burton, notices the arrival of Scott and Kenzo’s families, he complains that the Japanese are taking over Hawaii. Disregarding his father’s bigotry, Chuck instructs the servers to have the Tanakas and Konishis join their table. Later that evening, Amanda tells Mike that she would like him better if he didn’t act like her brother Chuck. When he agrees, they dance and kiss. Later, Lani performs a hula dance and afterward Chuck places a lei around her neck, and they kiss. The next day, Kenzo brings Mike to kendo practice. When Mr. Konishi challenges Mike to a duel, he repeatedly knocks the boy down and Kenzo becomes upset by his father’s dishonorable treatment of Mike. That night, the six friends drive along Hotel Street, passing seedy bars and clubs. After buying beer and pulling away from the curb, they stop short of a naval sailor, who recognizes Mike from the fight in the park. As they attempt to drive away, the car brakes in front of a large man who rips off the front bumper. Meanwhile, the sailor recruits friends to attack the car, causing the boys to be arrested. Early the next morning, at the police station, the fathers of Mike, Chuck, and Scott pay bail, but Mr. Konishi leaves the police station immediately, disgusted by Kenzo’s behavior. Later that day at kendo practice, Mr. Konishi unsheathes his ceremonial sword, and orders Kenzo to use the second sword in a duel, and wins, telling Kenzo he is not a worthy son. At Kilarney’s wedding reception on 21 August 1959, Kimo sees Lani and Chuck holding hands, and orders her to stay away from the tourist. Jerry explains that Kimo dislikes U.S. mainlanders because his mother had an affair with a visiting actor. In response, his father murdered both Kimo’s mother and the man, and then committed suicide. By nightfall, Lani returns to the wedding reception and leads Chuck away to her favorite place on the island. The following morning, Kimo searches for his sister Lani and threatens Chuck with a gun. However, Lani stands between the two men, announcing that she loves Chuck. When Kimo declares that his sister is a prostitute like their mother, a fight between the two men ensues and they fall into Kimo’s open convertible. As the vehicle rolls toward a cliff, Chuck jumps to safety, but Kimo is killed. After Kimo’s funeral, Lani tells Chuck she will follow her brother’s wishes, and never see him again. A few days later, a hurricane makes landfall and creates enormous waves. Excited, the six friends surf in the dangerous conditions. However, Mike notices Kenzo missing, dives underwater, and pulls the boy safely to the beach. At the end of the summer, on 8 September 1959, Mike and his parents prepare to fly home and Jerry goes with them to attend college. At the airfield, Chuck and Amanda, as well as their parents and Scott and Kenzo, bid their friends farewell. Just then, Lani arrives to restore her relationship with Chuck, and he introduces her to his parents as his fiancée. Meanwhile, Mr. Konishi greets Kenzo at the airfield, asks for forgiveness, and presents him with one of the ceremonial swords. He then gives the second sword to Mike, thanking him for saving his son’s life. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.