Fire Birds (1990)

PG-13 | 83 mins | Adventure | 25 May 1990

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HISTORY

The film begins with the following title card: “‘Our message to the drug cartels is this: The rules have changed. We will help any government that wants our help. When requested, we will for the first time make available the appropriate resources of America's armed forces.’--George Bush, President of the United States, September 5, 1989.” An opening caption reads: “Catamarca Desert, South America.”
       End credits contain the following information: “Footage from Crack USA: County Under Seige provided courtesy of Half-Court Productions, Inc. and Home Box Office, Inc.” Also, “The filmmakers wish to acknowledge and give special thanks to The Department of Defense, The Department of the Army, and the following military organizations for their cooperation in this production: General Maxwell R. Thurman, Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Southern Command; Major General Pat Brady; Brigadier General C. Lou Hennies; Office of the Asst Secretary of Defense, Public Affairs, Phil Strub, Don Baruch; U.S. Army Office of the Chief of Public Affairs, U.S. Army III Corps & Ft. Hood, Texas; U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command; U.S. Army Aviation Center & Ft. Rucker, Alabama; U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center & Ft. Bliss, Texas; 2nd Armored Division, Ft. Hood, Texas; U.S. Army Garrison, Ft. Huachuca, Arizona; Arizona Army National Guard; 6th Cavalry Brigade (Air Combat), Ft. Hood, Texas; Apache Training Brigade, Ft. Hood, Texas; 89th Military Police Brigade, Ft. Hood, Texas; U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground; U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground; U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground; U.S. Army Plant Representative Office, Mesa, Arizona; Association of the U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officers Association; U.S. Air Force, 1369th Audiovisual Squadron, Vandenberg AFB, California; Jerry Reeves, Andy North; 836th AD Davis-Monthan AFB--Arizona." Also, "Special thanks to: Virgil ... More Less

The film begins with the following title card: “‘Our message to the drug cartels is this: The rules have changed. We will help any government that wants our help. When requested, we will for the first time make available the appropriate resources of America's armed forces.’--George Bush, President of the United States, September 5, 1989.” An opening caption reads: “Catamarca Desert, South America.”
       End credits contain the following information: “Footage from Crack USA: County Under Seige provided courtesy of Half-Court Productions, Inc. and Home Box Office, Inc.” Also, “The filmmakers wish to acknowledge and give special thanks to The Department of Defense, The Department of the Army, and the following military organizations for their cooperation in this production: General Maxwell R. Thurman, Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Southern Command; Major General Pat Brady; Brigadier General C. Lou Hennies; Office of the Asst Secretary of Defense, Public Affairs, Phil Strub, Don Baruch; U.S. Army Office of the Chief of Public Affairs, U.S. Army III Corps & Ft. Hood, Texas; U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command; U.S. Army Aviation Center & Ft. Rucker, Alabama; U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center & Ft. Bliss, Texas; 2nd Armored Division, Ft. Hood, Texas; U.S. Army Garrison, Ft. Huachuca, Arizona; Arizona Army National Guard; 6th Cavalry Brigade (Air Combat), Ft. Hood, Texas; Apache Training Brigade, Ft. Hood, Texas; 89th Military Police Brigade, Ft. Hood, Texas; U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground; U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground; U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground; U.S. Army Plant Representative Office, Mesa, Arizona; Association of the U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officers Association; U.S. Air Force, 1369th Audiovisual Squadron, Vandenberg AFB, California; Jerry Reeves, Andy North; 836th AD Davis-Monthan AFB--Arizona." Also, "Special thanks to: Virgil and Mary Mercer; Phil Collins and Tony Smith; Al Gurbino; McDonnell Douglas Corporation, Bill Brown, Gobel James, Larry Welch, John Kiselyk, Philip Bautista; Honeywell, Inc., Military Avionics Division, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., The United States Army, Russell E. Rumney, Ralph Boyd; General Dynamics--Valley Systems Division; MBB Helicopter; Aeromarine Dynamics, Inc., Jim Merizan; Susan Godfrey; Sunspace Ranch Conference Center; Ramada Downtown Arizona; Tucson Film Commission; Texas Film Commission. Additional thanks to: Tucson Convention Center. Special thanks to Credit Lyonnais Bank, Nederland, N.V. for its financing and assistance.”
       According to studio materials in AMPAS library files, Fire Birds was filmed at Fort Hood, TX; Tucson, AZ; and the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter plant in Mesa, AZ. Principal photography began 27 Oct 1989, the 7 Nov 1989 HR and 15 Nov 1989 Var noted, and wrapped 2 Feb 1990, according to the 9 Feb 1990 HR. The first week of production took place on a restricted airfield at Fort Hood, where several Apaches were based.
       The 24 Aug 1989 DV reported that the U.S. government asked the producers of what was then called Wings of the Apache to identify the film’s locale as “Latin America,” rather than “Colombia,” which was the South American country receiving financial and military aid from the U.S. at the time. The producers compromised by placing the action in “South America.” The blessings of the U.S. Army and Drug Enforcement Agency were necessary in order for the production to have access to Apache helicopters and Army helicopter bases. Pilots were supplied by McDonnell-Douglas, the helicopter’s manufacturer, and special permission was required before actors and aerial photographers could be allowed inside the “$10 million ultra high-tech Apache helicopters.” Executive producer Arnold Kopelson estimated that the film’s $21 million budget would have been at least $5 million higher without government cooperation. Though not personally credited as producers, Eduard Sarlui and Moshe Diamant of Nova International Films were “50% participants” in the film. The article further stated that Scott Glenn was set to costar in the film with Nicolas Cage, but Tommy Lee Jones replaced him.
       The 10 Jan 1990 DV reported that despite the use of over 100 helicopters on the ground “and as many as four flying at one time and in close proximity,” there were no accidents during filming. Director David Green explained that constant “safety briefings” and restrictions allowing only “designated personnel” within 100 feet of the helicopters were the determining factors. “The number of helicopters that have crashed on film sets in legendary,” he said. Actors Nicholas Cage and Tommy Lee Jones did their own flying, accompanied by veteran Army pilots.
       The three men credited with the film’s story—Step Tyner, John K. Swensson, and Dale Dye—were all ex-military officers, the 14 Jan 1990 LAT reported. Tyner and Swensson were former Army colonels and Dye, who also played the character of “Col. A. K. McNeil,” was a former Marine captain. Sean Young, who portrayed “Billie Lee Guthrie,” was the daughter of journalist Lee Guthrie.
       The 25 Apr 1990 HR announced that when Buena Vista/Touchstone picked up Wings of the Apache in Mar 1990, the company changed the title to Fire Birds in the U.S. to avoid audience expectation that the film might be a Western. The company planned to ship 9,000 trailers to promote its 25 May 1990 national launch on 1,800 screens.
       Fire Birds “debuted strongly,” grossing $7.1 million on 2,000 screens, the 30 May 1990 Var reported, but business dropped off during the second week. The 6 Jun and 13 Jun 1990 editions of Var noted its “crash landing” and called the film a “flop.” Reviewers generally compared Fire Birds to Top Gun (1986, see entry). Not only were the stories similar, but Fire Birds producer William Badaloto was executive producer on Top Gun, and second unit director-aerial sequence designer Richard T. Stevens was Top Gun’s “aerial consultant.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Austin American Statesman
5 Nov 1989
Show World, p. 4
Austin American Statesman
25 May 1990
Weekend, p. 5
Daily Variety
24 Aug 1989
p. 2
Daily Variety
10 Jan 1990
p. 49
Hollywood Reporter
7 Nov 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Feb 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Apr 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 1990
p. 4, 64
Los Angeles Times
14 Jan 1990
Section N, p. 34
Los Angeles Times
25 May 1990
Section F, p. 4
New York Times
25 May 1990
p. 12.
Orange County Register
20 Sep 1989
Section I, p. 4
Time
26 Mar 1990.
---
Time Out (London)
17-24 Oct 1990
pp. 14, 15
Toronto Star
30 Nov 1989
Section L, p. 1
Variety
15 Nov 1989
p. 19
Variety
23 May 1990
p. 33
Variety
30 May 1990
p. 2
Variety
6 Jun 1990
p. 30
Variety
13 Jun 990
p. 35
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Touchstone Pictures Presents
A Nova International Films Release
A Keith Barish / Arnold Kopelson Production
A David Green Film
Distributed by Buena Vista Pictures Distribution Co., Inc.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
Aerial 1st A.D.
Aerial 2d A.D.
Addl 1st A.D.
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Aerial cam co-ord & Addl photog by
Dir of aerial photog
Cam op/Steadicam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Aerial cam op
Aerial cam op
Aerial cam op
Aerial 1st asst cam
Aerial 1st asst cam
Aerial 1st asst cam
Aerial 2d asst cam
Aerial loader
Wescam op
Wescam 1st A.C.
Wescam 1st A.C.
Aerial remote cam tech
Aerial remote cam tech
Aerial remote cam tech
Tracker op
1st A.C./Tracker
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Company grip
Company grip
Louma crane op
Louma crane op
Louma crane tech
Addl Steadicam op
Addl Steadicam op
Aerial still photog
Still photog
Still photog
Model dir of photog, Model unit crew
1st asst cam, Model unit crew
Rigging gaffer, Model unit crew
Cam & lenses provided by
Louma crane by
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dept coord
Story board artist
Story board artist
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
1st asst ed
Ed room asst
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead man
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
On set set dresser
Const coord
Const foreman
Set des
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Prop master
Asst prop master
Props asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
Costumer
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus ed
Supv mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus supv
Mus project mgr
SOUND
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
ADR loop group
Sd mixer
Aerial sd mixer
Aerial sd mixer
Aerial boom op
Supv sd ed, Model unit crew
Supv sd ed, Model unit crew
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
Addl sd eff
Addl sd eff, Taj Soundworks
Addl sd eff, Taj Soundworks
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec at The Burbank Studios
Re-rec at The Burbank Studios
Re-rec at The Burbank Studios
Re-rec at The Burbank Studios
Re-rec at The Burbank Studios
Re-rec at The Burbank Studios
Re-rec, Re-rec at The Burbank Studios
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff des
Spec eff coord
Spec eff consultant
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Radio control aircraft by, Model unit crew
Radio control pilot, Model unit crew
Radio control pilot, Model unit crew
Model shop supv, Model unit crew
Senior model maker, Model unit crew
Model maker, Model unit crew
Model maker, Model unit crew
Model maker, Model unit crew
Model maker, Model unit crew
Model maker, Model unit crew
Flying models asst, Model unit crew
Model painter, Model unit crew
Titles and opt eff by
Main titles des by
Process compositing by
Sr. process coord, Hansard
Process projectionist, Hansard
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
Asst hair/Make-up
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Aerial seq des by
DA/DOD project officer and chief tech adv
Aerial coord
Aerial cam pilot
Prod coord
Exec in charge of prod
Asst to the UPM
Aerial prod coord
Aerial adv
Scr supv
Prod assoc
Asst to the aerial coord
Asst to Mr. Green
Loc mgr
Asst loc
Prod accountant
Asst prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Unit pub
Asst prod coord
Asst to Mr. Kopelson
Asst to Mr. Kopelson
Asst to Mr. Barish
Asst to Mr. Barish
Asst to prod
Projectionist
Travel consultant
Travel consultant
First aid
First aid
Craft service
Caterer
Caterer
Casting asst
Casting asst
Atmosphere
Atmosphere
Atmosphere
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Aerial trans. capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Arizona driver
Arizona driver
Arizona driver
Arizona driver
Arizona driver
Arizona driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
AH-64 Apache pilot
AH-64 Apache pilot
AH-64 Apache pilot
AH-64 Apache pilot
AH-64 Apache pilot
AH-64 Apache pilot
AH-64 Apache pilot
AH-64 Apache pilot
OH-58D Scout pilot
Draken jet pilot
AH-1 Cobra pilot
AH-1 Cobra pilot
AH-1 Cobra pilot
AH-1 Cobra pilot
UH-60 Blackhawk pilot
UH-60 Blackhawk pilot
UH-60 Blackhawk pilot
UH-60 Blackhawk pilot
McDonnell Douglas HC field service rep
McDonnell Douglas HC field service rep
McDonnell Douglas HC field service rep
McDonnell Douglas HC field service rep
Bell Helicopter Textron field service rep
Bell Helicopter Textron field service rep
Aerial tech adv
Mock-up tech adv
Air Force tech adv
Arizona National Guard, Western Army National Guar
Arizona National Guard, Western Army National Guar
Arizona National Guard, Western Army National Guar
Army Aviation Support Facility #2
Ft. Hood, Texas, III Corps & Ft. Hood Public Affai
Ft. Hood, Texas, III Corps & Ft. Hood Public Affai
Ft. Hood--Airfield Commander, Army Aviation Suppor
6th Cavalry Brigade (Air Combat), Army Aviation Su
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry, AH-64 pilot
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry, AH-64 pilot
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry, AH-64 pilot
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry, AH-64 pilot
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry, AH-64 pilot
4th Squadron, 6th Cavalry, AH-64 pilot
Apache Training Brigade
Apache Training Brigade
2d Armored Division
2d Armored Division, OH-58D pilot
2d Armored Division, OH-58D pilot
89th Military Police Brigade
89th Military Police Brigade
U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command, Apache Program
Ft. Huachuca, Arizona
U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground, UH-60 pilot
U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground, UH-60 pilot
U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground, UH-60 pilot
Exec in charge of post prod, Model unit crew
Voice casting
Insurance provided by
Insurance provided by
Loc equipped by
Completion guaranty provided by
International licensing by
STAND INS
Stand-in for Nicolas Cage
Stand-in for Sean Young
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
DeLuxe col timer
DeLuxe col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Do You Remember," written and performed by Phil Collins, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products/Virgin Records Limited
"Find A Way To My Heart," written and performed by Phil Collins, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products/Virgin Records Limited
"The Good Life," written by David Young, Julius Robinson, Cindi Avnet Robinson, performed by Billy Trudel
+
SONGS
"Do You Remember," written and performed by Phil Collins, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products/Virgin Records Limited
"Find A Way To My Heart," written and performed by Phil Collins, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products/Virgin Records Limited
"The Good Life," written by David Young, Julius Robinson, Cindi Avnet Robinson, performed by Billy Trudel
"White Flag," written by David Young and Michael Sherwood, performed by Michael Sherwood
"Chain Of Fools," written by Don Covay, performed by Judson Spence, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Wings of the Apache
Release Date:
25 May 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 25 May 1990
New York opening: week of 25 May 1990
Production Date:
27 October 1989--2 February 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Nova International Films, Inc., Keith Barish/Arnold Kopelson Productions
Copyright Date:
22 May 1990
Copyright Number:
PA463749
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo SR™ in selected theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
83
Length(in feet):
7,779
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30312
SYNOPSIS

U.S. Army helicopter pilot Jake Preston is debriefed at a Pentagon meeting after surviving a military debacle in the Catamarca Desert in South America supporting a U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) mission against “the Cartel,” a power drug operation. Preston’s helicopter unit of two Cobras and one Blackhawk was no match against a Scorpion attack helicopter flown by mercenary-terrorist Eric Stoller. The only survivor, Preston is especially angry that his friend, Lieutenant Dobbs, was killed, and demands that the downed airmen be avenged. Because of America’s “executive mandate” to stop the illicit drug trade from Latin America, political leaders order General Olcott to mobilize a special army helicopter unit. Olcott puts Colonel A. K. McNeil in charge of the mission, and tells him to include Jake Preston. The colonel orders Chief Warrant Officer Brad Little to report to Camp Mitchell, Arizona, to train a team of helicopter pilots how to fly the Army’s new “agile, mobile, and hostile” AH-64 Apache. With its ability to do aerial somersaults and climb 3,000 feet per minute, the Apache is the only helicopter capable of fighting a Scorpion attack helicopter. Chief Brad Little, once the Army’s top gun, wants to be part of the task force, but McNeil stresses that his job is to train younger pilots. When Jake reports to Camp Mitchell, he is surprised that his former girl friend, Billie Lee Guthrie, is now a Scout helicopter pilot, whose job is to provide reconnaissance and “laser paint” targets for other pilots to destroy. Jake tries to rekindle their relationship, but Billie Lee wants no part of him, because he demanded that she be a traditional, obedient woman. During a briefing, Colonel ... +


U.S. Army helicopter pilot Jake Preston is debriefed at a Pentagon meeting after surviving a military debacle in the Catamarca Desert in South America supporting a U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) mission against “the Cartel,” a power drug operation. Preston’s helicopter unit of two Cobras and one Blackhawk was no match against a Scorpion attack helicopter flown by mercenary-terrorist Eric Stoller. The only survivor, Preston is especially angry that his friend, Lieutenant Dobbs, was killed, and demands that the downed airmen be avenged. Because of America’s “executive mandate” to stop the illicit drug trade from Latin America, political leaders order General Olcott to mobilize a special army helicopter unit. Olcott puts Colonel A. K. McNeil in charge of the mission, and tells him to include Jake Preston. The colonel orders Chief Warrant Officer Brad Little to report to Camp Mitchell, Arizona, to train a team of helicopter pilots how to fly the Army’s new “agile, mobile, and hostile” AH-64 Apache. With its ability to do aerial somersaults and climb 3,000 feet per minute, the Apache is the only helicopter capable of fighting a Scorpion attack helicopter. Chief Brad Little, once the Army’s top gun, wants to be part of the task force, but McNeil stresses that his job is to train younger pilots. When Jake reports to Camp Mitchell, he is surprised that his former girl friend, Billie Lee Guthrie, is now a Scout helicopter pilot, whose job is to provide reconnaissance and “laser paint” targets for other pilots to destroy. Jake tries to rekindle their relationship, but Billie Lee wants no part of him, because he demanded that she be a traditional, obedient woman. During a briefing, Colonel McNeil explains that the Cartel has become wealthy enough to purchase its own fighter jets and flying ace Eric Stoller, who pilots a small but deadly Scorpion. Currently at war with a South American government, the Cartel is preparing an offensive to take over the country. The pilots watch films of Stoller and Cuban troops. Later, the unit gives a surprise party for Chief Little and his wife Janet, who has joined him at Camp Mitchell. The pilots and their gunners practice war games in the “Black Box,” a video game-like simulator. Chief Little emphasizes that pilots “use the terrain,” flying low until they “pop up” and strike. Training with gunner Calvin Breaker, Jake proclaims himself “the greatest” as he blasts targets, but when he has to use the “monocle,” a device that lets him see the Apache’s computer images with his right eye, he “crashes.” Later, Jake approaches Billie Lee at a Laundromat and accuses her of sacrificing their relationship for flight school. The next morning, as Chief Little jogs, younger pilots run past him, and he soon becomes fatigued. That afternoon, he instructs his men that the best way to destroy an enemy helicopter is to get above and behind it and shoot down through its rotors. Later, at a disco, Jake gets into a fight with another officer over Billie Lee, and she walks out in disgust, demanding that Jake stay away from her. Colonel McNeil informs Chief Little that the Cartel has moved up its assault schedule, and the task force must be ready to deploy in a few days, but again he rebuffs Little’s request to fight with the unit, telling him that combat is “a young man’s game.” Little takes Jake on a training mission to learn the Apache’s right-eye sighting mechanism, but the young pilot cannot focus, and Little terminates the flight, putting Jake on probation. Devastated that he will miss the upcoming mission, Jake complains to Billie Lee that his left eye kept “taking over.” She points out that he has an “eye dominance” problem, because he is right-handed but aims with his left eye. Jake pleads with Chief Little for one more chance. That night, when Little tells his wife that his best pilot is washing out because he cannot use the Apache’s monocle sight, she reminds him of the old trick he used many years earlier. The next day, Little creates a makeshift periscope for Jake’s right eye and blinds his left eye with a pair of tight red panties. Driving around the desert in a Jeep, Jake gradually learns to navigate with only his right eye. After passing his test in the Apache, Jake celebrates by taking Billie Lee to a desert adobe hotel in his red Corvette, but she insists on driving. That night, they make love. In the final air-to-air combat test, Jake outmaneuvers Chief Little. General Olcott announces that the DEA is ready to launch Operation Firebird against the Cartel, and the task force has twenty-four hours to redeploy. Colonel McNeil picks Little to be his personal flight leader. Jake becomes angry when he learns Billie Lee will be the mission’s combat scout, fearing she might be killed. When the unit arrives at a Catamarca Desert staging area to await final orders, it comes under a attack, forcing the pilots and gunners to run to their helicopters. In her tiny Scout, Billie Lee finds enemy radar, and other pilots blow it up, but when she stumbles upon the Cartel’s airstrip, Eric Stoller gives chase in his Scorpion. Billie Lee radios Jake, who arrives in time to drive Stoller off. Suddenly, a jet fighter shoots down one of the Apaches, and another jet joins the battle. One jet is blown up, but Chief Little’s helicopter is shot down and his gunner killed. Billie Lee lands her Scout nearby and finds Chief Little injured, but alert. As a jet strafes them, Little instructs her how to use the helicopter’s Stinger air-to-air missile launcher as a shoulder launcher, and she shoots it down. Stoller chases Jake, but the American pilot uses the Apache’s maneuverability to drop down a cliff and roll back up as Stoller passes over, placing Jake behind and above the Scorpion—the optimum position for destroying the enemy. He blows Stoller out of the sky. Afterward, the colonel congratulates the pilots for distracting and then destroying the Cartel’s air power, allowing the DEA to successfully round up Cartel members. Jake flies with a medical helicopter to rescue Chief Little. He embraces Billie Lee, and when they fly back to the staging area in her Scout, she insists on “driving.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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