Money and the Woman (1940)

60 or 65 mins | Drama | 17 August 1940

Director:

William K. Howard

Cinematographer:

L. W. O'Connell

Editor:

Frank Magee

Production Designer:

Ted Smith

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

A biography on James M. Cain notes that his story was inspired by a man named Clarke Fitzpatrick, an old friend, who wrote to him asking for his comments on a study that he had written about embezzlement within his insurance company, entitled "1001 Embezzlers." According to the biography, Warner Bros. bought Cain's story for $3,500 in Jan 1940 and hired Cain to work on the script. A 15 Mar 1940 HR news item noted that Cain and Fred Niblo, Jr. had "turned in the completed screenplay" of the film, but Niblo's contribution to the film has not been determined. In 1943, Cain's story was published in a collection of his serials entitled Three of a Kind . Cain's biography also notes that producer Bryan Foy, who attended early story conferences on the film, vetoed an early draft of the script because he felt that the Hays Office would never approve a story in which the heroine is married to an embezzler. According to an LAEx pre-production news item, Money and the Woman was originally set as a George Brent, Frances Farmer and Humphrey Bogart vehicle, with Kurt Bernhardt directing and Bryan Foy producing. HR news items indicate that Brent, who was slated for the male lead, was replaced by Dennis Morgan, who was eventually replaced by Jeffrey Lynn. A 2 May 1940 HR news item noted that actress Priscilla Lane, who was assigned to play the female lead, was suspended by Warner Bros. after she refused to take the part. Lane's agent reportedly told the studio that "the role is not one that ... More Less

A biography on James M. Cain notes that his story was inspired by a man named Clarke Fitzpatrick, an old friend, who wrote to him asking for his comments on a study that he had written about embezzlement within his insurance company, entitled "1001 Embezzlers." According to the biography, Warner Bros. bought Cain's story for $3,500 in Jan 1940 and hired Cain to work on the script. A 15 Mar 1940 HR news item noted that Cain and Fred Niblo, Jr. had "turned in the completed screenplay" of the film, but Niblo's contribution to the film has not been determined. In 1943, Cain's story was published in a collection of his serials entitled Three of a Kind . Cain's biography also notes that producer Bryan Foy, who attended early story conferences on the film, vetoed an early draft of the script because he felt that the Hays Office would never approve a story in which the heroine is married to an embezzler. According to an LAEx pre-production news item, Money and the Woman was originally set as a George Brent, Frances Farmer and Humphrey Bogart vehicle, with Kurt Bernhardt directing and Bryan Foy producing. HR news items indicate that Brent, who was slated for the male lead, was replaced by Dennis Morgan, who was eventually replaced by Jeffrey Lynn. A 2 May 1940 HR news item noted that actress Priscilla Lane, who was assigned to play the female lead, was suspended by Warner Bros. after she refused to take the part. Lane's agent reportedly told the studio that "the role is not one that she should be asked to do" and that the replacement of Brent with Morgan was a factor in her decision not to accept the assignment. Production work on the film was temporarily halted due to Lane's departure. The film marked Jeffrey Lynn's first star billing. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Aug 40
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Sep 40
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 40
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 May 40
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 40
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jun 40
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 40
p. 9.
Los Angeles Examiner
19-Feb-40
---
Motion Picture Daily
13 Aug 40
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Aug 40
p. 32.
New York Times
4 Oct 40
p. 29.
Variety
29-May-40
---
Variety
18 Sep 40
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
In charge of production
WRITERS
Contr to scr const
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MAKEUP
Makeup
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Embezzler" by James M. Cain in Liberty (7 Feb--6 Mar 1940).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 August 1940
Production Date:
27 May--mid June 1940
addl scenes began early July 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 August 1940
Copyright Number:
LP9844
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60 or 65
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6332
SYNOPSIS

Dave Bennett, the vice president of a California banking corporation, is sent to investigate Charles Patterson, a clerk in the savings department at the Santa Monica branch. When Patterson falls gravely ill and is hospitalized for an operation, his wife Barbara fills in for him, and Dave soon falls in love with her. Over the course of his investigation, Dave discovers a shortage in Patterson's books, but because he loves Barbara, he withholds the information from the bonding company and lends her $9,000 to balance the books. Secretly, Barbara and Dave deposit money into forty-seven savings accounts in order to protect Jeannie, her daughter, from the knowlege that her father is a criminal. Later, when Barbara uncovers a plot by her husband and his mistress, Miss Church, the bank bookkeeper, to rob the bank, she plans a trip to Reno, where she intends to divorce Charles. Meanwhile, Charles, who has been released from the hospital, returns home, and, in an attempt to frame Barbara for the missing money at the bank, demands $9,000 from her father and tells him that the money will keep Barbara out of jail. When he refuses to give Charles the money, Charles locks his father-in-law and Jeannie in the closet and flees. Barbara and Dave try to prevent the bank heist from taking place, but when Barbara faints, Charles takes advantage of the diversion and sneaks into the bank vault. When Barbara and Dave learn that the vault in which Charles is locked is on a timed locking mechanism and cannot be opened until the following morning, they notify the police and wait for him to emerge. As ... +


Dave Bennett, the vice president of a California banking corporation, is sent to investigate Charles Patterson, a clerk in the savings department at the Santa Monica branch. When Patterson falls gravely ill and is hospitalized for an operation, his wife Barbara fills in for him, and Dave soon falls in love with her. Over the course of his investigation, Dave discovers a shortage in Patterson's books, but because he loves Barbara, he withholds the information from the bonding company and lends her $9,000 to balance the books. Secretly, Barbara and Dave deposit money into forty-seven savings accounts in order to protect Jeannie, her daughter, from the knowlege that her father is a criminal. Later, when Barbara uncovers a plot by her husband and his mistress, Miss Church, the bank bookkeeper, to rob the bank, she plans a trip to Reno, where she intends to divorce Charles. Meanwhile, Charles, who has been released from the hospital, returns home, and, in an attempt to frame Barbara for the missing money at the bank, demands $9,000 from her father and tells him that the money will keep Barbara out of jail. When he refuses to give Charles the money, Charles locks his father-in-law and Jeannie in the closet and flees. Barbara and Dave try to prevent the bank heist from taking place, but when Barbara faints, Charles takes advantage of the diversion and sneaks into the bank vault. When Barbara and Dave learn that the vault in which Charles is locked is on a timed locking mechanism and cannot be opened until the following morning, they notify the police and wait for him to emerge. As expected, the vault opens automatically the next morning, but Charles manages to shoot his way out. A bullet hits Dave, who is hospitalized but is soon released. Later, Barbara is questioned by police, and Dave begins to doubt her innocence, but he soon changes his mind when new clues point to Miss Church's home, where they find Charles and the money. Charles eludes capture once again, but is eventually captured following a car chase. After Charles and Miss Church are arrested, Dave is honored as a hero and is offered a job at the bank's Honolulu branch, which he vows to accept only if Barbara consents to join him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.