Caddyshack II (1988)

PG | 97 mins | Comedy | 22 July 1988

Director:

Allan Arkush

Cinematographer:

Harry Stradling

Editor:

Bernard Gribble

Production Designer:

William F. Matthews

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

In a 3 Mar 1999 interview, Caddyshack (1980, see entry) writer-director Harold Ramis told The Onion that Warner Bros. pressured him to return for a sequel, which would focus on the character of “Al Czervik,” reprised by Rodney Dangerfield. Uninterested in directing again, Ramis agreed to reteam with his writing partner, Peter Torokvei, and frequently consulted with Dangerfield on the screenplay. Alan Metter was hired as director, following the success of his collaboration with Ramis and Dangerfield in the 1986 comedy, Back to School (see entry). According to a 21 Sep 1987 Long Beach Press-Telegram article, casting issues delayed production. Although both Bill Murray and Chevy Chase were rumored to be reprising their Caddyshack roles, Murray opted to star in Scrooged (1988, see entry), and his character was replaced with Dan Aykroyd’s “Capt. Tom Everett.”
       Less than a month before filming, a 28 Oct 1987 Var brief announced that Dangerfield had dropped out of the project due to contract disputes. Although the 3 Nov 1987 DV claimed that the production agreed to accommodate for Dangerfield’s health by filming near his residence in Los Angeles, CA, the 4 Nov 1987 HR stated that the actor demanded additional royalties and final cut rights that Warner Bros. had “never granted to any actor.” With $2,190,000 already spent on pre-production, the studio sued Dangerfield for punitive damages and postponed filming until Jan 1988. It was around this time, Ramis stated, that the studio hired Allan Arkush to replace Alan Metter as director.
       Two weeks later, a 17 Nov 1987 DV item ... More Less

In a 3 Mar 1999 interview, Caddyshack (1980, see entry) writer-director Harold Ramis told The Onion that Warner Bros. pressured him to return for a sequel, which would focus on the character of “Al Czervik,” reprised by Rodney Dangerfield. Uninterested in directing again, Ramis agreed to reteam with his writing partner, Peter Torokvei, and frequently consulted with Dangerfield on the screenplay. Alan Metter was hired as director, following the success of his collaboration with Ramis and Dangerfield in the 1986 comedy, Back to School (see entry). According to a 21 Sep 1987 Long Beach Press-Telegram article, casting issues delayed production. Although both Bill Murray and Chevy Chase were rumored to be reprising their Caddyshack roles, Murray opted to star in Scrooged (1988, see entry), and his character was replaced with Dan Aykroyd’s “Capt. Tom Everett.”
       Less than a month before filming, a 28 Oct 1987 Var brief announced that Dangerfield had dropped out of the project due to contract disputes. Although the 3 Nov 1987 DV claimed that the production agreed to accommodate for Dangerfield’s health by filming near his residence in Los Angeles, CA, the 4 Nov 1987 HR stated that the actor demanded additional royalties and final cut rights that Warner Bros. had “never granted to any actor.” With $2,190,000 already spent on pre-production, the studio sued Dangerfield for punitive damages and postponed filming until Jan 1988. It was around this time, Ramis stated, that the studio hired Allan Arkush to replace Alan Metter as director.
       Two weeks later, a 17 Nov 1987 DV item reported that comedian Jackie Mason had been cast as the new leading actor after several Warner Bros. executives traveled to see his one-man show on Broadway. According to The Onion, Ramis refused to accompany them, and another writer, who is not credited onscreen, completed the script. Ramis claimed he attempted to have his name removed from the project altogether, but was warned that publicity printed in the industry trade papers would reflect poorly on the film.
       Principal photography began 18 Jan 1988, as reported in a Mar 1988 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that filming took place in at the Rolling Hills Golf Resort and Country Club in Davie, FL, and several Los Angeles locations, including the Westlake Riding Academy. In a 22 Jul 1988 LAHExam news story, Mason cited a production cost of $26 million.
       Caddyshack II was released 22 Jul 1988 without advance press screenings. Reviews were overwhelmingly negative, and the 26 Jul 1988 DV reported opening weekend earnings of just $4,436,330 from 1,556 theaters.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Nov 1987.
---
Daily Variety
17 Nov 1987.
---
Daily Variety
26 Jul 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
Mar 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 1988
p. 3, 54.
LAHExam
22 Jul 1988.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
21 Sep 1987.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Jul 1988
Calendar, p. 5.
New York Times
23 Jul 1988
p. 16.
The Onion
3 Mar 1999.
---
Variety
28 Oct 1987.
---
Variety
27 Jul 1988
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Guber-Peters Production
An Allan Arkush Movie
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op Florida
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Still photog Florida
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl film ed
Addl film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec Florida
Leadperson
Leadperson Florida
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's costumer
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
Women's costumer
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
Supv mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Orch
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Foley by
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Titles & optials by
Visual eff prod at
Visual eff art dir, ILM visual eff unit
Gopher const supv, ILM visual eff unit
Visual eff prod, ILM visual eff unit
Visual eff prod, ILM visual eff unit
Key puppeteer, ILM visual eff unit
Key puppeteer, ILM visual eff unit
Dir of photog, ILM visual eff unit
1st cam asst, ILM visual eff unit
Gopher const, ILM visual eff unit
Gopher const, ILM visual eff unit
Gopher const, ILM visual eff unit
Gopher const, ILM visual eff unit
Gopher const, ILM visual eff unit
Gopher const, ILM visual eff unit
Modelmaker, ILM visual eff unit
Modelmaker, ILM visual eff unit
Modelmaker, ILM visual eff unit
Visual eff ed, ILM visual eff unit
Stage project supv, ILM visual eff unit
Eff cam op, ILM visual eff unit
Eff cam op, ILM visual eff unit
Eff cam op, ILM visual eff unit
Eff cam op, ILM visual eff unit
Head stage tech, ILM visual eff unit
Stage tech, ILM visual eff unit
Stage tech, ILM visual eff unit
Stage tech, ILM visual eff unit
Stage tech, ILM visual eff unit
2d cam asst, ILM visual eff unit
Gopher set coord, ILM visual eff unit
Eff anim, ILM visual eff unit
Eff anim, ILM visual eff unit
Eff anim, ILM visual eff unit
Rotoscope, ILM visual eff unit
Rotoscope, ILM visual eff unit
Opt lineup, ILM visual eff unit
Opt lineup, ILM visual eff unit
Opt cam op, ILM visual eff unit
Opt cam op, ILM visual eff unit
Opt cam op, ILM visual eff unit
Storyboard artist, ILM visual eff unit
Prod asst, ILM visual eff unit
Asst visual eff ed, ILM visual eff unit
Asst visual eff ed, ILM visual eff unit
Addl contributor, ILM visual eff unit
Addl contributor, ILM visual eff unit
Addl contributor, ILM visual eff unit
Addl contributor, ILM visual eff unit
Addl contributor, ILM visual eff unit
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod secy
Prod aide
Prod aide
Prod aide
Loc mgr
Prod accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Horse trainer
Unit pub
Asst to Neil Canton
Asst to Allan Arkush
Asst to Jon Peters
STAND INS
Gopher vocals
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the characters created by Brian Doyle-Murray & Harold Ramis & Douglas Kenney.
SONGS
"Nobody's Fool," performed by Kenny Loggins, produced by Dennis Lambert, written by Kenny Loggins and Michael Towers, courtesy of CBS Records
“I Run Right Back,” performed by Patty Smyth, produced by Ric Ocasek, written by Diane Warren, courtesy of CBS Records
"Heart Of Glass," performed by Tamara Champlin, produced by Jay Graydon, written by Tamara Champlin, Bill Champlin and Bruce Gaitsch
+
SONGS
"Nobody's Fool," performed by Kenny Loggins, produced by Dennis Lambert, written by Kenny Loggins and Michael Towers, courtesy of CBS Records
“I Run Right Back,” performed by Patty Smyth, produced by Ric Ocasek, written by Diane Warren, courtesy of CBS Records
"Heart Of Glass," performed by Tamara Champlin, produced by Jay Graydon, written by Tamara Champlin, Bill Champlin and Bruce Gaitsch
"Money (That's What I Want)," performed by Cheap Trick, produced by Richie Zito, written by Berry Gordy and Janie Bradford, courtesy of CBS Records
"Power of Persuasion," performed by The Pointer Sisters, produced by Jerry Knight and Aaron Zigman, written by Diane Warren, courtesy of RCA Records
"Go For Yours," performed by Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam with Full Force, produced by Full Force, written by Full Force, courtesy of CBS Records
"Jack Fresh," performed by Full Force, produced by Full Force, written by Full Force, courtesy of CBS Records
"One Way Out," performed by Eric Martin, produced by Michael Dilbeck and Andy Johns, written by Martin Page and Clif Magness
"Turn On (The Beat Box)," performed by Earth, Wind and Fire, produced by Maurice White and Rhett Lawrence, written by Rhett Lawrence, Maurice White and Martin Page, courtesy of CBS Records
"Blame It On The Bossa Nova," written by Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann
"Theme From Jaws," written by John Williams
"Straight, No Chaser," written by Thelonious Monk.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 July 1988
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 22 July 1988
Production Date:
began 18 January 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
11 August 1988
Copyright Number:
PA382511
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29283
SYNOPSIS

Eager to fit in with her upper-class peers, Kate Hartounian befriends the snobbish Mary Frances “Miffy” Young, who suggests that Kate and her father, Jack, become members of the Bushwood Country Club. Although Jack is a self-made millionaire who earned his money in real estate development, he remains humble and maintains a close relationship with his workers. While breaking ground on a low-income housing project in the community, he is threatened by the wife of the Bushwood Historical Society president, who strongly opposes Jack’s efforts to integrate the neighborhood. Unphased, Jack laughs at her and sends one of his workers to chase her off the property with a bulldozer. Despite his disdain for the club’s elitism, Kate convinces her father to meet with majority owner Ty Webb about applying for membership. At the club, Ty arranges for Jack to play golf with Miffy’s parents, Chandler and Cynthia Young, and Jack recognizes Cynthia as the woman he nearly bulldozed. As they tee off, Jack's abominable skills and boorish behavior amuse the Youngs’ friend, Elizabeth Pearce. Meanwhile, the Bushwood Historical Society pursues legal action to stop development on Jack’s housing project until he obtains permits from the city planning commission. Regardless, Kate begins a relationship with Miffy's brother, Todd Young, who oversees the Historical Society’s case against her father. At the club ball, Jack tangos seductively with Elizabeth, mortifying the onlooking guests. To escape the embarrassment, Kate sneaks outside and strikes up a conversation with a young caddy named Harry, who questions her obsession with joining upper class society. As she helps Harry with his golf swing, Todd appears and drags her away to another party. Back inside, Chandler officially rejects ... +


Eager to fit in with her upper-class peers, Kate Hartounian befriends the snobbish Mary Frances “Miffy” Young, who suggests that Kate and her father, Jack, become members of the Bushwood Country Club. Although Jack is a self-made millionaire who earned his money in real estate development, he remains humble and maintains a close relationship with his workers. While breaking ground on a low-income housing project in the community, he is threatened by the wife of the Bushwood Historical Society president, who strongly opposes Jack’s efforts to integrate the neighborhood. Unphased, Jack laughs at her and sends one of his workers to chase her off the property with a bulldozer. Despite his disdain for the club’s elitism, Kate convinces her father to meet with majority owner Ty Webb about applying for membership. At the club, Ty arranges for Jack to play golf with Miffy’s parents, Chandler and Cynthia Young, and Jack recognizes Cynthia as the woman he nearly bulldozed. As they tee off, Jack's abominable skills and boorish behavior amuse the Youngs’ friend, Elizabeth Pearce. Meanwhile, the Bushwood Historical Society pursues legal action to stop development on Jack’s housing project until he obtains permits from the city planning commission. Regardless, Kate begins a relationship with Miffy's brother, Todd Young, who oversees the Historical Society’s case against her father. At the club ball, Jack tangos seductively with Elizabeth, mortifying the onlooking guests. To escape the embarrassment, Kate sneaks outside and strikes up a conversation with a young caddy named Harry, who questions her obsession with joining upper class society. As she helps Harry with his golf swing, Todd appears and drags her away to another party. Back inside, Chandler officially rejects Jack’s membership application, but is unable to stop him from bidding on all the members who volunteered for the “society slaves” charity auction. To make a point about the value of earning an honest living, Jack puts them to work on his construction site. The disgraced club members retaliate by shutting down power at Jack’s office. Vowing to get even, Jack purchases Ty Webb’s majority shares and reopens the club as an amusement park. Frustrated by her father’s childish behavior, Kate moves into Miffy’s house. Meanwhile, Chandler hires retired U.S. Marine Corps Captain Tom Everett to go undercover and kill Jack, but the bumbling officer repeatedly misses his target. Giving him one last chance, Chandler instructs Everett to hide in the bushes with an explosive golf ball while he competes against Jack in a game that will determine the fate of the housing development. While Chandler plays with his son, Todd, Jack teams with Harry. Despite an early struggle, Jack and Harry move ahead and tie the score. Everett surveys the final hole from afar, but becomes distracted by Bushwood’s mischevious resident gopher, which shoots him in the buttocks with a poisoned dart. As the players prepare to make their putts, Kate retaliates against Miffy’s snobbery and apologizes to her father for disowning him. On the hillside, Everett begins to lose consciousness and misses his opportunity to hit Jack with the explosive ball. Once Jack successfully sinks his putt, the gopher replaces Chandler’s ball with the explosive ball, which detonates upon impact with the club. Chandler is badly burned, and Jack wins the game. Kate kisses Harry, while Jack and Elizabeth embrace in celebration of their victory. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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