Lisa (1990)

PG-13 | 95 mins | Drama | 20 April 1990

Director:

Gary Sherman

Producer:

Frank Yablans

Cinematographer:

Alex Nepomniaschy

Editor:

Ross Albert

Production Designer:

Patricia Van Ryker

Production Companies:

United Artists Pictures, Inc., Surreal Productions
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HISTORY

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Lisa was filmed in various Los Angeles County, CA, neighborhoods, including Hollywood, Pacific Palisades, Venice, Pasadena, Tarzana, Topanga Canyon, and downtown Los Angeles. Among the more recognizable Hollywood landmarks are the Crossroads of the World at 6671 Sunset Boulevard, where “Katherine Holland” operates a flower shop; Blessed Sacrament School at 6641 Sunset Boulevard, where “Lisa” and “Wendy” attend school; the El Royale Apartments at 450 N. Rossmore in Hollywood, where the killer, “Richard,” lives, and Muse, a then-trendy restaurant at 7360 Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles, where Richard works.
       Electrician Chuck McIntyre, III's last name is misspelled "McIntrye" in the credits.
       Principal photography began 1 May 1989, the 6 Jun 1989 HR noted. The 19 Jun 1989 DV reported that writer/director Gary Sherman worked on Lisa for eight years. He originally set the story in Chicago, IL, but moved it to Los Angeles because “the best child actors” were there. Fourteen-year-old Staci Keanan and fifteen-year-old Tanya Fenmore carried seventy percent of the film, Sherman said. Interior sets, including the Venice loft where Katherine and Lisa lived, were built on the third floor of an old building at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Cherokee Avenue. Sherman predicted that the concentration of locations in Hollywood would bring down the number of shooting days from fifty-six to thirty-seven.
       United Artists pushed back the release of Lisa from January to 20 Apr 1990 to give Gary Sherman and producer Frank Yablans time to appeal the Motion Picture of America Association’s original R-rating. The film was finally given a limited release with a more audience-friendly ... More Less

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Lisa was filmed in various Los Angeles County, CA, neighborhoods, including Hollywood, Pacific Palisades, Venice, Pasadena, Tarzana, Topanga Canyon, and downtown Los Angeles. Among the more recognizable Hollywood landmarks are the Crossroads of the World at 6671 Sunset Boulevard, where “Katherine Holland” operates a flower shop; Blessed Sacrament School at 6641 Sunset Boulevard, where “Lisa” and “Wendy” attend school; the El Royale Apartments at 450 N. Rossmore in Hollywood, where the killer, “Richard,” lives, and Muse, a then-trendy restaurant at 7360 Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles, where Richard works.
       Electrician Chuck McIntyre, III's last name is misspelled "McIntrye" in the credits.
       Principal photography began 1 May 1989, the 6 Jun 1989 HR noted. The 19 Jun 1989 DV reported that writer/director Gary Sherman worked on Lisa for eight years. He originally set the story in Chicago, IL, but moved it to Los Angeles because “the best child actors” were there. Fourteen-year-old Staci Keanan and fifteen-year-old Tanya Fenmore carried seventy percent of the film, Sherman said. Interior sets, including the Venice loft where Katherine and Lisa lived, were built on the third floor of an old building at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Cherokee Avenue. Sherman predicted that the concentration of locations in Hollywood would bring down the number of shooting days from fifty-six to thirty-seven.
       United Artists pushed back the release of Lisa from January to 20 Apr 1990 to give Gary Sherman and producer Frank Yablans time to appeal the Motion Picture of America Association’s original R-rating. The film was finally given a limited release with a more audience-friendly PG-13, but the 24 Apr 1990 DV reported that box-office returns were “mild.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Jul 1990.
---
Daily Variety
19 Jun 1989
p, 2
Daily Variety
12 Jan 1990
p.
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1990
p. 2, 18
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 1990
p. 4, 15
Los Angeles Times
20 Apr 1990
Calendar, p. 10
Variety
25 Apr 1990
pp. 32-33
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
United Artists Presents
A Frank Yablans Production
A Film by Gary Sherman
Distributed by MGM/UA
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Addl photog
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
Elec
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dept assoc
FILM EDITORS
2d asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set des
Const coord
Const foreman
Paint foreman
Standby painter
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Floral concepts
Floral des
Floral des
Floral des
COSTUMES
Cost des
Costumer
Fashion consultant to Mr. Moffett
MUSIC
Mus ed
Asst to the comp
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom man
Cable man
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
ADR ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Foley supv
Sd eff rec
1st asst sd ed
2d asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Title des
MAKEUP
Make-up
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting asst
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc
Prod coord
Unit pub
Prod accountant
Accounting asst
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Asst to Mr. Yablans
Asst to Mr. Sherman
Extra casting
Studio teacher
First aid
Craft service
Caterer
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'm A Man," by Ellas McDaniel, performed by Bo Diddley, courtesy of MCA Records
"Love Me Like A Man," by Bob Marline, Sheila Burns & Marie Burns, performed by The Burns Sisters, courtesy of CBS Records, Music Licensing Department
"Love Machine," by Matthew Shumway & Adam Gifford, performed by Paradise
+
SONGS
"I'm A Man," by Ellas McDaniel, performed by Bo Diddley, courtesy of MCA Records
"Love Me Like A Man," by Bob Marline, Sheila Burns & Marie Burns, performed by The Burns Sisters, courtesy of CBS Records, Music Licensing Department
"Love Machine," by Matthew Shumway & Adam Gifford, performed by Paradise
"Satisfaction Guaranteed," by Matthew Shumway & Adam Gifford, performed by Paradise
"Dust My Blues," by Joe Josea & Elmore James, performed by Elmore James, courtesy of Duck Soup Music Group/Espy Music Group
"Someday Baby," by Sam Hopkins, performed by Sam "Lightning" Hopkins, courtesy of Duck Soup Music Group/Espy Music Group
"Little Boy Blues," by Jules Taub & Walter Horton, performed by Walter "Mumbles" Horton, courtesy of Duck Soup Music Group/Espy Music Group.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 April 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 20 April 1990
Production Date:
began 1 May 1989
Copyright Claimant:
United Artists Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 April 1990
Copyright Number:
PA483644
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Panaflex® camera and lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Richard lights candles and pours wine into two glasses. When Mary arrives home and turns on her telephone answering machine, Richard’s taped voice announces he is in her apartment and is going to kill her. A hand grabs Mary’s throat from behind. Elsewhere, fourteen-year-old Venice, California, high school girls Lisa Holland and Wendy Marks change into “grown-up” dresses and, using a Polaroid camera, set up a “photo opportunity” with an unsuspecting young man in a sports car. At home, Lisa puts the photograph into her scrapbook of imaginary boyfriends. With Wendy at her ear, Lisa telephones Mr. Adams, an employee of the Department of Motor Vehicles, and in a “grown-up” voice convinces him to reveal the sports car driver’s telephone number. That evening, Lisa helps her attractive, single mother, Katherine Holland, prepare dinner in their third floor apartment. Discussing men and dating, Katherine recounts how Bob, a male customer at her flower shop, telephoned several times for a personal conversation, but would not reveal his identity. Lisa asks if she can double date with Wendy and two boys from school, but Katherine fears her repeating the mistake she made at fourteen, when Lisa’s father got her pregnant. Katherine sends Lisa around the corner to a grocery store, and as Lisa runs home afterward, she bumps into Richard, a handsome, well-dressed young man. As they stoop to pick up her groceries and his audiocassette tapes, Richard gently warns Lisa to watch where she is going. Entranced, Lisa follows Richard to his car and writes down his license plate number. The next day, she gets his home number from the DMV. In a sexy voice, Lisa teases Richard on the telephone. ... +


Richard lights candles and pours wine into two glasses. When Mary arrives home and turns on her telephone answering machine, Richard’s taped voice announces he is in her apartment and is going to kill her. A hand grabs Mary’s throat from behind. Elsewhere, fourteen-year-old Venice, California, high school girls Lisa Holland and Wendy Marks change into “grown-up” dresses and, using a Polaroid camera, set up a “photo opportunity” with an unsuspecting young man in a sports car. At home, Lisa puts the photograph into her scrapbook of imaginary boyfriends. With Wendy at her ear, Lisa telephones Mr. Adams, an employee of the Department of Motor Vehicles, and in a “grown-up” voice convinces him to reveal the sports car driver’s telephone number. That evening, Lisa helps her attractive, single mother, Katherine Holland, prepare dinner in their third floor apartment. Discussing men and dating, Katherine recounts how Bob, a male customer at her flower shop, telephoned several times for a personal conversation, but would not reveal his identity. Lisa asks if she can double date with Wendy and two boys from school, but Katherine fears her repeating the mistake she made at fourteen, when Lisa’s father got her pregnant. Katherine sends Lisa around the corner to a grocery store, and as Lisa runs home afterward, she bumps into Richard, a handsome, well-dressed young man. As they stoop to pick up her groceries and his audiocassette tapes, Richard gently warns Lisa to watch where she is going. Entranced, Lisa follows Richard to his car and writes down his license plate number. The next day, she gets his home number from the DMV. In a sexy voice, Lisa teases Richard on the telephone. Recalling what her mother told her about Bob, she plays guessing games, calls Richard “Rick,” and tells him she will call later. Meanwhile, as Katherine walks home from the store, she passes a house where a young man pounds on the door and yells for Alison. He asks if Katherine knows Alison, and she answers no. Lisa pulls her hidden scrapbook from beneath her bed and opens to a page prepared for Richard. A silhouette of a head awaits a Polaroid photograph. Scott, Katherine’s on-again-off-again boyfriend, visits her flower shop and complains that she treats him like an “illicit” lover. She responds that her precocious, sexually curious daughter is not ready for the complications of having her mother’s boyfriend around. Wendy and Lisa wait near the El Royale Apartments until Richard walks out wearing a tuxedo. They follow with a Polaroid camera. Richard stops at a women’s gym and, through a window, watches a young woman. Wendy and Lisa run past him in their school uniforms, but Richard focuses only on the woman as she leaves the gym and gets into her car. Lisa and Wendy follow Richard to the Muse restaurant, where he is the manager. Later, a young woman named Judy arrives home, turns on her answering machine, and hears Richard’s message. He grabs Judy in a chokehold and drags her into the bedroom, where a dozen lighted candles surround her bed. When Lisa and Wendy later telephone Richard and tease him, he records the conversation on a cassette tape. After listening back to Lisa’s voice, he files the tape with other cassettes marked “Mary,” “Alison,” and “Judy.” Larry Marks, Wendy’s father, stops by Katherine and Lisa’s apartment to pick up Wendy. He brings a newspaper with a headline announcing that “The Candlelight Killer” has claimed his seventh victim. Larry asks Katherine and Lisa if they would like to accompany the Marks family to Big Bear, California, for the weekend, but Katherine turns down the offer. The next day, Lisa sneaks into the El Royale’s underground garage. By chance, another resident drives into the garage, and when he electronically locks his door, he unlocks Richard’s suburban utility vehicle because their security devices have the same code. The man’s companion points out that he unlocked his neighbor’s car, but he informs her that the door will automatically relock. Lisa gets into Richard’s SUV, and as she pretends to drive, the doors lock. Moments later, Richard appears and electronically unlocks the door. He notices that he unlocked another car nearby, but pays no attention. Before Richard gets into his car, Lisa hides behind his seat. Richard drives to a dry cleaner, and as he crosses the street he locks the SUV behind him. Inside the shop, he hears his car alarm. Hurrying back to his SUV, Richard finds the back door open and realizes someone was inside. Later, when Lisa telephones, he tells her to call him Richard instead of Rick. She reveals that her name is Lisa, and hangs up. Katherine telephones from the flower shop to give permission for Lisa to go to Big Bear with Wendy’s family. That evening, Katherine takes Lisa bowling, and when a friendly man gives Lisa bowling tips in hopes of talking with her mother, Katherine gently rebuffs him. Later, during a telephone call, Richard insists he is dying to see Lisa, but again she becomes anxious and hangs up. The next day, Wendy suggests that if Lisa introduced Richard to her mother, maybe Katherine would be less uptight and let Lisa date. The next night, Lisa telephones Richard and tells him she will be at the Muse that evening wearing a “sexy white dress.” She arranges for Katherine to take her to the restaurant and maneuvers her mother into wearing a white dress. Wearing Katherine’s blue “grown-up” dress, she insists they act like sisters, not mother and daughter. Lisa also reminds Katherine to smile, because there are lots of “cute guys” at Muse. After dinner, Katherine goes to the restroom just as Richard arrives for work. When the waiter delivers the check, Lisa writes a note for Richard on a napkin, leaves a lipstick kiss, signs “Lisa,” and places it inside the check holder. As Katherine leaves the restroom, Richard greets her warmly as “the lady in white,” but she brushes him off. After Katherine and Lisa leave, the waiter delivers the note and check to Richard. The credit card receipt reveals Katherine Holland’s name and address. At home, during an argument, Katherine cancels Lisa’s trip to Big Bear with the Marks family, and takes away Lisa’s telephone. The next day, Richard stops at the flower shop, speaks to Katherine’s assistant, and leaves as Katherine arrives. He follows her home that night. Finding Lisa gone, Katherine telephones the Marks family in Big Bear, berates Lisa for disobedience, and warns of a serious talk when Lisa gets home. The next day, when Katherine leaves the flower shop, her car reeks of tobacco, and cigarette butts are stuffed in the ashtray. During a late trip to the grocery store around the corner, Katherine walks through a busy police crime scene. She learns that a neighbor named Alison has been missing all week and was found dead, a victim of “The Candlelight Killer.” Later, when Lisa telephones Richard from Big Bear, he reveals that he knows her name is Katherine, not Lisa. Lisa hangs up and tells Wendy she has to get home as soon as possible. Richard buys candles at the grocery store where Katherine and Lisa shop. Katherine arrives home and listens to Lisa’s message on the answering machine, telling her that a guy named Richard might telephone, but it is only a joke. The next message is from Richard himself. He is in the house and is going to kill her. Katherine thinks it is a prank, but as she goes into another room, Richard grabs her by the throat. Outside, the Marks family drops off Lisa and she hurries upstairs. The apartment is dark and quiet, until she enters her bedroom. Richard stuns Katherine by banging her forehead against Lisa’s. Dropping the nearly unconscious Katherine to the floor, Richard grabs Lisa’s throat and drags her into Katherine’s bedroom, where candles surround the bed. As Richard prepares to rape and kill Lisa, Katherine plunges a kitchen knife into his back. As Richard pulls it out and blocks them from leaving, Katherine blinds him with Mace, and Lisa knees him in the groin. They escape into Lisa’s bedroom and lock the door, but Richard smashes his way through. Katherine hits him with a baseball bat, knocking him out the window, and Richard falls to the concrete three stories below. As Katherine and Lisa embrace and cry, the answering machine, broken during the struggle, repeats a recorded voice saying, “Hi, this is Richard.”
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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