Look Who's Talking Too (1990)

PG-13 | 81 mins | Comedy | 14 December 1990

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HISTORY

End credits contain the following acknowledgments: “Sincere appreciation to Motion Picture Studio Production Technicians I.A.T.S.E. Local 891, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; the cities of Vancouver and North Vancouver; Diane Neufeld, British Columbia Film Commission; William F. White Limited; Lions Gate Hospital; Peanuts characters © 1958 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.; Garfield characters © 1978 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.; Betty Boop by permission of King Features Syndicate, Inc. and Fleischer Studios, Inc.; Iron Maiden T-shirts courtesy of Sanctuary Music, Inc. and The Great Southern Company.” Other information includes the following: “Filmed in part at the North Shore Studios on location in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.”
       According to the 11 May 1990 Vancouver Sun and the 26 May 1990 Globe and Mail of Toronto, the production auditioned a thousand babies and toddlers for roughly thirty-five roles. In Vancouver, local parents “overloaded” and “swamped” the film’s “baby coordinator,” Julie Keatley, after the local newspaper listed her telephone number. The 29 Jun 1990 Vancouver Sun reported that the youngest “actress” was week-old Nikki Graham of North Vancouver, who played “Julie Ubriacco” as a newborn. The makeup artists spread milky infant formula over the infant’s body and “dabbed fake blood on her” for a birth scene.
       Principal photography began in Vancouver on 11 Jun 1990, as announced in the 3 Jul 1990 HR, and ended in New York City on 24 Aug 1990, according to the 31 Aug 1990 Vancouver Sun. Director/co-writer Amy Heckerling told the 25 Sep 1990 HR she filmed in Vancouver because of Canada’s “less restrictive” child labor laws allowing babies to spend more time ... More Less

End credits contain the following acknowledgments: “Sincere appreciation to Motion Picture Studio Production Technicians I.A.T.S.E. Local 891, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; the cities of Vancouver and North Vancouver; Diane Neufeld, British Columbia Film Commission; William F. White Limited; Lions Gate Hospital; Peanuts characters © 1958 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.; Garfield characters © 1978 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.; Betty Boop by permission of King Features Syndicate, Inc. and Fleischer Studios, Inc.; Iron Maiden T-shirts courtesy of Sanctuary Music, Inc. and The Great Southern Company.” Other information includes the following: “Filmed in part at the North Shore Studios on location in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.”
       According to the 11 May 1990 Vancouver Sun and the 26 May 1990 Globe and Mail of Toronto, the production auditioned a thousand babies and toddlers for roughly thirty-five roles. In Vancouver, local parents “overloaded” and “swamped” the film’s “baby coordinator,” Julie Keatley, after the local newspaper listed her telephone number. The 29 Jun 1990 Vancouver Sun reported that the youngest “actress” was week-old Nikki Graham of North Vancouver, who played “Julie Ubriacco” as a newborn. The makeup artists spread milky infant formula over the infant’s body and “dabbed fake blood on her” for a birth scene.
       Principal photography began in Vancouver on 11 Jun 1990, as announced in the 3 Jul 1990 HR, and ended in New York City on 24 Aug 1990, according to the 31 Aug 1990 Vancouver Sun. Director/co-writer Amy Heckerling told the 25 Sep 1990 HR she filmed in Vancouver because of Canada’s “less restrictive” child labor laws allowing babies to spend more time on set. “We wouldn’t have been able to work long enough with the toddler if the film had been made in the United States,” she said. Overall, the production spent sixty-one days in Vancouver, with the majority of filming at Stephen J. Cannell’s 13.5-acre North Shore Studios, and filmed two days of exteriors in New York City. Most of the film crew was Canadian.
       The 26 Mar 1990 People hinted that television talk show host Arsenio Hall would provide the voice of a new African American baby named “Eddie,” but the 12 Nov 1990 Var noted that Richard Pryor took the job instead. However, when test audiences reacted unfavorably to Pryor’s voice, producers replaced him with Damon Wayans. Rosanne Barr, the voice of baby “Julie,” replaced Joan Rivers from the original 1989 film, Look Who's Talking (1989, see entry). Rivers was uncredited in that film. Although baby Julie was born at the end of Look Who’s Talking, she was conceived again and reborn at the beginning of Look Who’s Talking Too.
       Actress Kirstie Alley’s salary for the sequel was $2.5 million, as reported in the 30 Sep 1990 Newsday. She made the film during hiatus from her $3-million-a-year role on the television show, Cheers, making Alley one of Hollywood’s top-paid female stars at that time.
       The film premiered in Los Angeles on 13 Dec 1990, the night before its national release, as announced in that day's ^HR. Despite the box office success of the original Look Who’s Talking, the sequel grossed only $16 million during its first twelve days in North American theaters, the Feb 1991 Box reported.
       According to the 17 Jun 1991 HR, producers Jeanne Meyers and Rita Stern filed a $20-million lawsuit in 1990 against Tri-Star Pictures, Amy Heckerling, and actress Twink Caplan (Heckerling’s assistant), claiming “the premise and several plot points” for Look Who’s Talking were “lifted” from their 1984 AFI student film, Special Delivery. Tri-Star had originally optioned the project for development. The suit was settled in U.S. District Court for an undisclosed sum. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Feb 1991.
---
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1991
p. 24.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 1990
p. 5, 19.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Dec 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jun 1991
p. 4, 53.
Los Angeles Times
14 Dec 1990
Calendar, p. 8.
New York Times
14 Dec 1990
p. 20.
Newsday
30 Sep 1990.
---
People
26 Mar 1990.
---
The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
26 May 1990
Section C, p. 13.
The Vancouver Sun
11 May 1990
Section C, p. 7.
The Vancouver Sun
15 May 1990
Section D, p. 10.
The Vancouver Sun
29 Jun 1990
Section D, p. 1.
The Vancouver Sun
31 Aug 1990
Section C, p. 1.
Variety
23 May 1990
p. 25.
Variety
12 Nov 1990
p. 87.
Variety
17 Dec 1990
p. 44.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Tri-Star Pictures Presents
A Jonathan D. Krane Production
An Amy Heckerling Film
A Tri-Star Release
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Unit mgr
3d asst dir
DGC trainee
Unit prod mgr, New York 2d unit
1st asst dir, New York 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
"B" cam op
Steadicam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Stills photog
Cam trainee
Video assist op
Video playback op
Gaffer
Elec best boy
Generator op
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Cam op, New York 2d unit
1st asst cam, New York 2d unit
Gaffer, New York 2d unit
Key grip, New York 2d unit
Film processed by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept trainee
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Asst set dec
Set buyer
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Asst const coord
Const buyer
Head painter
Lead painter
Prop master, New York 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Set cost supv
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus supv
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
Orch
Orch conducted by
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
A.D.R. ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
A.D.R. mixer
A.D.R. mixer
Rec
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd mixer, New York 2d unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Asst spec eff
Titles and Opticals by
Spec character eff created and des by
General mgr, Chris Walas, Inc.
Project supv, Chris Walas, Inc.
Mechanical supv, Chris Walas, Inc.
Painting supv, Chris Walas, Inc.
Des, Chris Walas, Inc.
Animatronic eng, Chris Walas, Inc.
Animatronic eng, Chris Walas, Inc.
Animatronic eng, Chris Walas, Inc.
Animatronic eng, Chris Walas, Inc.
Animatronic eng, Chris Walas, Inc.
Vis eff title seq by
Eff supv, JEX FX
Dir of photog, JEX FX
Prod coord, JEX FX
Cam asst, JEX FX
Sperm wrangler, JEX FX
Grip & Lighting, JEX FX
DANCE
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Asst make-up artist
Hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Baby casting and handling by
Baby coord
Baby handler/Pediatric nurse
Extras casting
Casting assoc
Product placement
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Guardian/Baby driver
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Trainee prod coord
Asst to Ms. Heckerling
Asst to Mr. Krane
Asst to Mr. Travolta
Asst to Miss Alley
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Animal trainer
Craft service/1st aid
Catering by
Prod coord, New York 2d unit
Loc mgr, New York 2d unit
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Amy Heckerling.
SONGS
"All Shook Up," written by Otis Blackwell & Elvis Presley, performed by Elvis Presley, courtesy of RCA Records
"Are You Lonesome Tonight," written by Roy Turk & Lou Handman, performed by Elvis Presley, courtesy of RCA Records
"Catch Us If You Can," written by Dave Clark & Lenny Davidson, performed by The Dave Clark Five, courtesy of Dave Clark Productions
+
SONGS
"All Shook Up," written by Otis Blackwell & Elvis Presley, performed by Elvis Presley, courtesy of RCA Records
"Are You Lonesome Tonight," written by Roy Turk & Lou Handman, performed by Elvis Presley, courtesy of RCA Records
"Catch Us If You Can," written by Dave Clark & Lenny Davidson, performed by The Dave Clark Five, courtesy of Dave Clark Productions
"Daddy's Coming Home," written by Bruce Willis & Robert Kraft
"Do You Want To Dance," written & performed by Bobby Freeman, courtesy of Rhino Records, Inc.
"Fight For Your Right (To Party)," written by Beastie Boys & Rick Rubin
"The Glamour Boys," written by Vernon Reid, performed by Living Colour, courtesy of CBS Records, Music Licensing Department
"Got My Mind Set On You," written by Rudy Clark, performed by George Harrison, courtesy of Dark Horse Records
"I Enjoy Being A Girl," written by Richard Rodgers & Oscar Hammerstein, performed by Jodi Benson
"I Got You Babe," written by Sonny Bono, performed by Sonny & Cher, courtesy of Atco Records by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Jealous Guy," written & performed by John Lennon, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc., by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Minnie The Moocher," written by Cab Calloway, Irving Mills & Clarence Gaskill, performed by Cab Calloway
"Party All The Time," written by Rick James
"Party Doll," written by Jimmy Bowen & Buddy Knox
"Please Mr. Postman," written by Freddie Gorman, Brian Holland, Georgia Dobbins, Robert Bateman & William Garrett, performed by The Marvelettes, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
"Rebel Yell," written by Billy Idol & Steve Stevens, performed by Billy Idol, courtesy of Chrysalis Records Inc.
"Sea Of Love," written by Philip Baptiste & George Khoury, performed by Phil Philips, courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
"Tri-Star Logo Theme," written by Dave Grusin
"Wherever Would I Be," written by Diane Warren, performed by Cheap Trick, courtesy of CBS Records, Music Licensing Department.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 December 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 14 December 1990
New York opening: week of 14 December 1990
Production Date:
11 June--24 August 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Tri-Star Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
16 January 1991
Copyright Number:
PA509360
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® in selected theaters
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
81
Length(in feet):
7,213
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30763
SYNOPSIS

James and Mollie Ubriacco begin to make love, but Mikey, their young son, screams as he imagines a devil possessing his toys. James goes to calm the little boy, and when he returns, Mollie is asleep. James awakens her, and during lovemaking, one of his sperm “tadpoles” slips past Mollie’s diaphragm cup, swims to an egg, and fertilizes it. Later, Mollie Ubriacco brings Mikey a “potty” to begin toilet training, and the boy is intimidated. Rona, Mollie’s best friend and fellow accountant, explains during lunch how food choices can determine the gender of a developing fetus. When Mollie takes Mikey to the office where she works, her boss, Mr. Ross, objects, and the boy pours a bottle of “White-Out” liquid paper eraser on his shoe. As Mollie’s well-to-do Jewish parents, Rosie and Lou, work on Mollie and James’s joint income tax return, Rosie belittles James’s earning capacity as a taxicab driver. James tries to regain his dignity by reminding Rosie that he earns extra money as a free-lance flying instructor. Mollie lays Mikey’s hand on her stomach to let him feel the baby, and informs him that he will soon have a little sister. Mikey imagines walking the baby in a stroller on the streets of New York City and protecting her from bad boys. During a meeting with tax clients, Mollie goes into labor and is whisked to the hospital. James arrives in time to witness the Caesarian birth and passes out at the sight of blood. After James introduces Mikey to his baby sister, Julie, the boy tells the infant he will be in charge for the next few years. At the park, Mikey and his little ... +


James and Mollie Ubriacco begin to make love, but Mikey, their young son, screams as he imagines a devil possessing his toys. James goes to calm the little boy, and when he returns, Mollie is asleep. James awakens her, and during lovemaking, one of his sperm “tadpoles” slips past Mollie’s diaphragm cup, swims to an egg, and fertilizes it. Later, Mollie Ubriacco brings Mikey a “potty” to begin toilet training, and the boy is intimidated. Rona, Mollie’s best friend and fellow accountant, explains during lunch how food choices can determine the gender of a developing fetus. When Mollie takes Mikey to the office where she works, her boss, Mr. Ross, objects, and the boy pours a bottle of “White-Out” liquid paper eraser on his shoe. As Mollie’s well-to-do Jewish parents, Rosie and Lou, work on Mollie and James’s joint income tax return, Rosie belittles James’s earning capacity as a taxicab driver. James tries to regain his dignity by reminding Rosie that he earns extra money as a free-lance flying instructor. Mollie lays Mikey’s hand on her stomach to let him feel the baby, and informs him that he will soon have a little sister. Mikey imagines walking the baby in a stroller on the streets of New York City and protecting her from bad boys. During a meeting with tax clients, Mollie goes into labor and is whisked to the hospital. James arrives in time to witness the Caesarian birth and passes out at the sight of blood. After James introduces Mikey to his baby sister, Julie, the boy tells the infant he will be in charge for the next few years. At the park, Mikey and his little African-American friend, Eddie, discuss making the big change from wearing diapers to sitting on a potty. Alarmed by Mikey picking a crack pipe off the ground, Mollie decides the park is too dangerous. Over James’s objection, she enrolls Mikey in “Baby Gym.” The couple argues over Mikey’s bedtime, because James wants to watch television with his son, while Mollie wants the child to get plenty of sleep. James insists that Mollie’s larger income as an accountant does not give her the right to make all household decisions. Lou, Mollie Ubriacco’s father, arranges for James to be interviewed for a pilot’s job at Airborne Express, but James feels her parents are trying to control his life. He reluctantly goes to the interview and gets hired. Stuart, Mollie’s obnoxious brother, arrives at the apartment because he lost his corporate accounting position and has nowhere to stay. Despite James’s objection, Mollie lets Stuart sleep on the living room couch. Mikey wakes up at night with a strong need to urinate, but is afraid the toilet’s mouth will bite his bottom. Mikey teaches Julie which toys she must avoid, because they belong to him. James complains to Mollie that corporate clients he flies in Airborne Express’s jets treat him as if he were still a cabbie. Also, he must carry a beeper and be on call twenty-four hours a day. One night, as James comes home late, Stuart pulls a gun on him in the dark. Stuart claims he needs the gun for emergencies, but James does not want it in the house with two young children. At the Baby Gym, Joel, the owner, leads children in exercises, and Mikey urinates in his pants. At home, James resents Stuart wearing his clothes, borrowing money from Mollie, and lying around the apartment all day. When Mollie refuses to evict her brother, James packs his clothes and leaves instead. Mollie wallows in loneliness and cries as she watches people kiss on television. Her friend, Rona, asks to stay temporarily with Mollie because her apartment was burglarized and she is afraid to go home. Rona immediately falls in love with Stuart. When Mikey tears up his sister’s favorite stuffed toy, Julie decides to leave home as soon as she learns to walk. James picks up Mikey and Julie, takes them to a movie theater, and uses them to wheedle free admittance and popcorn. He assures his children he misses them and hopes to return home soon. Mollie notices that Stuart and Rona are spending more time together. Overjoyed to see daughter Julie take her first steps, Mollie instinctively calls out to James before remembering he no longer lives there. As Mollie, Stuart, and Rona—all accountants—spend Saturday night doing their taxes, Mollie imagines James driving a sports car with a beautiful blonde. At the Baby Gym, Mikey and Eddie discuss their toilet training. When James Ubriacco stops by, he amuses the roomful of children by dancing like Elvis Presley in Jailhouse Rock. Later, as James drops the kids at home, Rona convinces him that Mollie wants to reconcile with him. Mikey yells for mommy and daddy to come see that he has finally gone to the toilet all by himself, and James and Molly are very proud of him. After James is called out on a night job, Mollie worries about the terrible weather. She telephones the airport, but James is already in his jet. She takes a taxi to the airport, runs to the airplane, and refuses to leave until James promises he will not fly in the storm. An argument is averted when the air control tower cancels all flights. James embraces Mollie, realizing she still loves him. Meanwhile, a robber breaks into their apartment. Stuart grabs his gun and chases the thief down a fire escape, but flames ignite on the kitchen stove. James and Mollie arrive home in a taxi, as Stuart fights the burglar in the middle of the street. James knocks the burglar unconscious, and police arrive to arrest the criminal. Seeing flames in their window, Mollie and James run into their apartment building. The elevator doors open and Mikey pushes Julie’s stroller into the lobby. James hurries upstairs to put out the fire with an extinguisher. Later, the whole family dines at Mollie’s parents’ house, and everyone seems happy. Mikey takes Julie aside, pledges his brotherly love, and tells her they have to stick together from now on. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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