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HISTORY

The film begins with this title card: “In 1962, President Kennedy, believing that the wars of the future would be low intensity conflicts such as guerrilla wars and acts of terrorism, created an elite special forces unit to meet the enemy on his own turf. Experts in sea-air-land operations, they are known as...” An opening card introduces the place and time: “U.S.S. Forrestal, Eastern Mediterranean, Present Day.” Other locations are titled: “Norfolk, Virginia”; “Seaport, Eastern Mediterranean”; “Washington, D.C.”; “Norfolk, Virginia”; “Seal Command Center”; “Washington, D.C.”; “Rapid Deployment Base Northern Cyprus”; “U.S.S. Coral Sea Off the Coast of Lebanon”; and “Beirut, Lebanon.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, eight former SEALs were hired to train the actors and occasionally perform stunts. The actors underwent a two-week indoctrination course in northern VA, taking part in field maneuvers and weapons training. Principal photography began near Naval Station Norfolk, VA, on either 16 Sep 1989 or 5 Oct 1989, according to the 1 Nov 1989 and 6 Dec 1989 editions of DV, and later moved to southern Spain, where shooting likely began on 1 Nov 1989, as reported in the 3 Nov 1989 DV and the 8 Nov 1989 HR. The production used the Mediterranean ports of Tarifa, Cadiz, and Cartagena, which doubled for Arab towns, and the Spanish navy provided submarines, battleships, helicopters, and background actors. Cartagena’s old Moorish inner city stood in for Beirut, Lebanon. Notes indicate that the director used up to seven cameras filming simultaneously in several action scenes.
       The film was budgeted at $20 million, according to the 8 Nov 1989 HR. Though the 23 Jun ... More Less

The film begins with this title card: “In 1962, President Kennedy, believing that the wars of the future would be low intensity conflicts such as guerrilla wars and acts of terrorism, created an elite special forces unit to meet the enemy on his own turf. Experts in sea-air-land operations, they are known as...” An opening card introduces the place and time: “U.S.S. Forrestal, Eastern Mediterranean, Present Day.” Other locations are titled: “Norfolk, Virginia”; “Seaport, Eastern Mediterranean”; “Washington, D.C.”; “Norfolk, Virginia”; “Seal Command Center”; “Washington, D.C.”; “Rapid Deployment Base Northern Cyprus”; “U.S.S. Coral Sea Off the Coast of Lebanon”; and “Beirut, Lebanon.”
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, eight former SEALs were hired to train the actors and occasionally perform stunts. The actors underwent a two-week indoctrination course in northern VA, taking part in field maneuvers and weapons training. Principal photography began near Naval Station Norfolk, VA, on either 16 Sep 1989 or 5 Oct 1989, according to the 1 Nov 1989 and 6 Dec 1989 editions of DV, and later moved to southern Spain, where shooting likely began on 1 Nov 1989, as reported in the 3 Nov 1989 DV and the 8 Nov 1989 HR. The production used the Mediterranean ports of Tarifa, Cadiz, and Cartagena, which doubled for Arab towns, and the Spanish navy provided submarines, battleships, helicopters, and background actors. Cartagena’s old Moorish inner city stood in for Beirut, Lebanon. Notes indicate that the director used up to seven cameras filming simultaneously in several action scenes.
       The film was budgeted at $20 million, according to the 8 Nov 1989 HR. Though the 23 Jun 1989 HR reported that Angelo Pizzo was writing the script for Navy SEALs, he is not listed in the credits. Items in the 7 Aug 1989 and 31 Oct 1989 editions of DV reported that the script included aliens that Michael Biehn’s character, at that point called “Lt. Coffey,” sets out to destroy with a nuclear weapon.
       The 30 Oct 1989 LAT, 18 Jul 1990 The Ottawa Citizen, and 19 Jul 1990 The Gazette of Montreal, Canada, detailed the U.S. Navy’s unhappiness with the Navy SEALs project. The SEALs commando program was still "top secret," and the Navy feared “breach of security.” They were also unhappy with the “steamy plot” and Charlie Sheen’s character’s “psychotic” behavior. Officials withheld cooperation, and the production contracted with the Spanish Navy to use its American-made ships and helicopters. Additionally, several script rewrites were required because of the Navy’s objections. Actors Charlie Sheen and Michael Biehn reportedly rewrote their own scenes. The Navy originally tried to cut the script’s use of SEALs kidnapping foreign nationals, but backed off after American forces snatched President Manuel Noriega during an invasion of Panama, according to the 11 Jan 1990 DV. The 10 Aug 1990 LAT noted that the film’s advertising bore the line: “From today’s headlines: ‘Middle East Mission, Navy SEALs to the Rescue.’”
       The Navy SEAL eagle logo was slightly altered in the movie, according to the 17 Jul 1990 Chicago Tribune.
       The 19 Jul 1990 HR announced that Navy SEALs opened at “approximately 1,350 screens.” Though the Sep 1990 Box reported it grossed $6.5 million the first week, the film was “already taking a dive” by the end of the month, according to the 31 Jul 1990 DV.
       End credits contain the following acknowledgments: "We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of: The Department of Defense; The Department of the Navy; Captain Michael T. Sherman, USN; Lieutenant James E. Brooks, USN. The producers gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the cities of Cartegena, Cadiz, Almeria and Tarifa, Spain and Virginia Beach, Virginia. 'Tears of Rage' photograph courtesy of Reuters America. Thanks to Bud Industries; Peko Security Systems; Raytheon Marine Sales; GF Furniture Systems; Cooper Lighting; Grass Valley Group, Inc.; Dual-Lite; Racal-Milgo; Daycor Corp.; Electrohome Ltd.; Zodiak; Lynx Golf, Inc.; Henderson Aquatics, Inc.; Thomson Consumer Electronics; and GTE Mobilnet." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Sep 1990.
---
Chicago Tribune
17 Jul 1990
p. 14
Daily Press (Newport News, VA)
23 Sep 1989
Section C, p. 1
Daily Press (Newport News, VA)
14 Jul 1990
Section C, p. 1
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1989
p. 14
Daily Variety
31 Oct 1989
p. 244
Daily Variety
1 Nov 1989
p. 30
Daily Variety
3 Nov 1989
p. 26
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1989
p. 20
Daily Variety
11Jan 1990
p. 2
Daily Variety
31 Jul 1990
p. 4
Daily Variety
21 Aug 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1990
p. 6, 18
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jul 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Aug 1990.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
16 Jun 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Oct 1989
Section B, p. 1
Los Angeles Times
20 Jul 1990
Calendar, p. 18
Los Angeles Times
10 Aug 1990
Calendar, p. 2
New York Times
20 Jul 1990
p. 9
Ottawa Citizen (Canada)
18 Jul 1990
Section E, p. 1
The Gazette (Montreal)
19 Jul 1990
Section F, p. 3
Variety
18 Jul 1990
pp. 20-21
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Film by Lewis Teague
An Orion Pictures release
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
Asst unit mgr, 2d unit
Prod mgr, Spanish crew
Unit mgr, Spanish crew
2d asst dir, Spanish crew
2d 2d asst dir, Spanish crew
Asst dir/2d unit, Spanish crew
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
Addl asst cam
Addl asst cam
Best boy elec
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Rigging grip
Dolly grip
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Spec asst to Bob Carmichael, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Video asst, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Model unit cam, 2d unit
Dir of photog, Aerial unit
Cam op, Aerial unit
Asst cam, Aerial unit
Asst cam, Aerial unit
Asst cam, Aerial unit
Skydiving cam, Aerial unit
Skydiving cam, Aerial unit
Asst, Aerial unit
Asst, Aerial unit
Gaffer, Aerial unit
Key grip, Aerial unit
Underwater cam, Underwater unit
Asst cam, Underwater unit
Underwater gaffer, Underwater unit
Cam asst, Spanish crew
Cam asst, Spanish crew
Video playback op, Spanish crew
Key elec, Spanish crew
Key grip, Spanish crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Conceptual artist
Art dir, Spanish crew
Asst art dir, Spanish crew
Draftsperson, Spanish crew
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Post-prod supv
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Leadman
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop
Asst prop
Bapty representative
Bapty representative
Const coord
Const coord
Scenic artist
Model maker, Spanish crew
Propman, Spanish crew
Propman, Spanish crew
Props buyer, Spanish crew
Swing gang leader, Spanish crew
Const coord, Spanish crew
Chief carpenter, Spanish crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
Asst ward
Selected ward for Ms. Whalley-Kilmer by
MUSIC
Mus supv
Supv mus ed
Asst mus ed
Orch performance by
Cond by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Video coord
Supv sd ed
ADR supv
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec facilities
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Eff ed
Eff ed
Eff ed
Asst eff ed
Asst eff ed
Asst eff ed
Asst eff ed
Asst eff ed
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff runner
Spec eff tech, Spanish crew
Spec eff tech, Spanish crew
Spec eff tech, Spanish crew
Spec eff asst, Spanish crew
Title des by
Opticals and titles by
MAKEUP
Spec makeup
Makeup artist
Makeup artist for Ms. Whalley-Kilmer
Hairstylist
Makeup artist, 2d unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod coord
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Loc liaison
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Naval consultant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Asst to Lewis Teague
Asst to Brenda Feigen
New York casting
New York casting
London casting
Casting assoc
Voice casting
Financial controller
Asst financial controller
Financial representative
Asst accountant
Post-prod accountant
Post-prod accountant
Prod runner
Prod runner
Prod runner
Asst prod coord
Office asst
Office asst
Office asst
Office asst
Craft service
First aid
Shipping representative
delete this line
Prod coord, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Helicopter pilot, Aerial unit
Lear jet pilot, Aerial unit
Pilot, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Skydiver, Aerial unit
Underwater unit coord, Underwater unit
Loc mgr, Spanish crew
Loc mgr, Spanish crew
Loc asst, Spanish crew
Naval coord, Spanish crew
Prod secy, Spanish crew
Prod secy, Spanish crew
Prod buyer, Spanish crew
Accountant, Spanish crew
Accountant, Spanish crew
Loc and extras casting, Spanish crew
Projectionist, Spanish crew
Transportation capt, Spanish crew
Spec vehicles, Spanish crew
Promotional coord provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stunt double for Mr. Sheen
Trainer for Mr. Sheen
Stunt coord, Spanish crew
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col timer
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Tempt Me (If You Want To)," written by Jude Cole/Bill Wray/Lisa Hartman, produced by Bill Wray, performed by Lisa Hartman, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Wounded Warrior," written by Vini Poncia/Vicki Thomas, produced by Vini Poncia, performed by Vicki Thomas
"Strike Like Lightning," written by Giorgio Moroder/Tom Whitlock/Larry Lee/Steve Bates, produced by Giorgio Moroder/Larry Lee, performed by Mr. Big, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
+
SONGS
"Tempt Me (If You Want To)," written by Jude Cole/Bill Wray/Lisa Hartman, produced by Bill Wray, performed by Lisa Hartman, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Wounded Warrior," written by Vini Poncia/Vicki Thomas, produced by Vini Poncia, performed by Vicki Thomas
"Strike Like Lightning," written by Giorgio Moroder/Tom Whitlock/Larry Lee/Steve Bates, produced by Giorgio Moroder/Larry Lee, performed by Mr. Big, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
"The Boys Are Back In Town," written by Philip Parris Lynott, produced by Bob Rack, performed by Bon Jovi, courtesy of Mercury/Polygram Records and The Make A Difference Foundation
"Hangin' On My Hip," written by Bruce Turgon/Lou Gramm, produced by Peter Wolf, performed by Lou Gramm, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Shadows," written by Giorgio Moroder/Tom Whitlock/Larry Lee/Steve Bates, produced by Giorgio Moroder/Larry Lee, performed by Mr. Big, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
"Try," written by Jim Cuddy/Greg Keeler, produced by Terry Brown, performed by Blue Rodeo, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp./WEA Music of Canada, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"The Dragon," written and produced by Lawrence Gowan/Eddie Schwartz, performed by Gowan, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Hardline," written by Tom Kimmel/Dennis Morgan, produced by David Kershenbaum/Bob Marlette, performed by Richie Havens
"I Don't Want To Say Goodnight," written by Clif Magness/Glen Ballard/Jay Craydon, produced and performed by Planet 3, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Navy S.E.A.L.
Release Date:
20 July 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 20 July 1990
New York opening: week of 20 July 1990
Production Date:
began 16 September or 5 October 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Orion Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
4 September 1990
Copyright Number:
PA477613
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo SR™ in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Prints
Prints by DeLuxe®
Duration(in mins):
113
Length(in feet):
10,209
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30299
SYNOPSIS

The U.S.S. Forrestal aircraft carrier in the Eastern Mediterranean receives a distress call from an oil tanker. As a U.S. Navy helicopter approaches, Arab terrorists in a gunboat emerge from behind the flaming tanker and shoot it down. Lieutenant Junior Grade Dale Hawkins awakens on a beach in Norfolk, Virginia, and walks to a nearby house, where he and his fellow U.S. Navy SEALs (Sea, Air, and Land commandos), Lieutenant James Curran and Chief Petty Officer Billy Graham, have been partying all night to celebrate Billy’s wedding that afternoon. They ride to the church in a Jeep, and while passing over a bridge, the wedding-phobic Dale Hawkins escapes by leaping into the bay below. As Jolena, Billy Graham’s bride, walks down the aisle with her father, six SEALs, including best man Curran and the groom, are notified on their beepers to return to base immediately. Graham promises Jolena he will call her later. Meanwhile, at an Eastern Mediterranean seaport, the Arabs return with three American helicopter crewmen. The terrorist group leader, Ben Shaheed, tells his men to kill the hostages, then leaves. An interrogator shoots one of the Americans in the head, and prepares to kill a second, but a SEAL team led by Lt. Curran bursts into the room with machine guns blazing. The SEALs kills the terrorists, free the two surviving Americans, take photographs, and gather information. Nearby, Ben Shaheed ducks into a room, tears off some of his clothes, and bloodies himself. When Dale Hawkins breaks in and finds him, Shaheed claims to be a captive Egyptian sailor. In his haste to evacuate quickly, Hawkins leaves Shaheed unharmed. The SEALs fight their way out ... +


The U.S.S. Forrestal aircraft carrier in the Eastern Mediterranean receives a distress call from an oil tanker. As a U.S. Navy helicopter approaches, Arab terrorists in a gunboat emerge from behind the flaming tanker and shoot it down. Lieutenant Junior Grade Dale Hawkins awakens on a beach in Norfolk, Virginia, and walks to a nearby house, where he and his fellow U.S. Navy SEALs (Sea, Air, and Land commandos), Lieutenant James Curran and Chief Petty Officer Billy Graham, have been partying all night to celebrate Billy’s wedding that afternoon. They ride to the church in a Jeep, and while passing over a bridge, the wedding-phobic Dale Hawkins escapes by leaping into the bay below. As Jolena, Billy Graham’s bride, walks down the aisle with her father, six SEALs, including best man Curran and the groom, are notified on their beepers to return to base immediately. Graham promises Jolena he will call her later. Meanwhile, at an Eastern Mediterranean seaport, the Arabs return with three American helicopter crewmen. The terrorist group leader, Ben Shaheed, tells his men to kill the hostages, then leaves. An interrogator shoots one of the Americans in the head, and prepares to kill a second, but a SEAL team led by Lt. Curran bursts into the room with machine guns blazing. The SEALs kills the terrorists, free the two surviving Americans, take photographs, and gather information. Nearby, Ben Shaheed ducks into a room, tears off some of his clothes, and bloodies himself. When Dale Hawkins breaks in and finds him, Shaheed claims to be a captive Egyptian sailor. In his haste to evacuate quickly, Hawkins leaves Shaheed unharmed. The SEALs fight their way out of the compound, but Graham and Hawkins become separated and stumble into an arms warehouse. During a firefight with terrorists, Hawkins sees dozens of crates of shoulder-fired “Stinger” missiles capable of shooting down aircraft. He tries to blow them up with a hand grenade, but destroys only one box. As he and Graham join the other SEALs for a scheduled rendezvous with a helicopter, Hawkins wants the team to go back and destroy the Stingers, but Lt. Curran overrules him because they must leave immediately. Later, during a debriefing, Navy intelligence officers ask why they failed to destroy the Stingers and the “Egyptian.” Two Israeli intelligence men decide not to tell the Americans that the Egyptian is actually terrorist leader Ben Shaheed. They telephone Tel Aviv, Israel, instead. At the Pentagon, near Washington, D.C., several military men and civilians watch a video of Al-Shahada leader Ben Shaheed being interviewed by half-Lebanese, half-British television reporter Claire Varrens. Shaheed claims that Americans have no business raiding Middle East countries and killing Arabs, and Arabs have a duty to kill them. U.S. government official Warren Stinson worries about Shaheed’s access to Stingers, and again asks Lt. Curran why his SEAL team did not destroy them. In Norfolk, Virginia, Lt. Curran tells his commanding officer, Captain Dunn, that he wants to return to Lebanon and destroy the missiles, but the captain orders him and his men to take time off. The SEAL team, accompanied by Jolena, goofs off on a golf course and races golf carts. When a truck tows Hawkins’s illegally parked car, he gives chase on a bicycle and climbs on the truck. He lowers the truck bed until his car rolls off, and he drives it away. Meanwhile, at SEAL Command Center, satellite photographs reveal the Stingers are on the Lebanon-bound freighter Latanya. The SEALs are ordered to interdict and destroy the missiles, but warned that the freighter also carries Muslim pilgrims. The SEALs board a submarine shadowing the Latanya off the coast of Syria. At night, they release small, motorized rafts from the submarine airlock, ride them to the freighter, and climb aboard. Muslim pilgrims sleep on deck. When the SEALs capture the ship’s captain, he insists there are no missiles aboard. Two terrorists are among the pilgrims, but the SEALs kill them both. The following day, a helicopter arrives with Americans to search the cargo hold, but the Stinger crates are filled with sand. In Washington, D.C., Claire Varrens tells a television host that true Islam is tolerant and does not condone terrorism. However, years of civil war in Lebanon have created enraged and violent militant groups. Lt. Curran approaches Claire afterward, looking for “research material.” Over lunch, he tries to coax information from her, but Claire explains that she is a journalist, not a spy, and has no information about the Stingers. When she asks to witness SEAL training exercises, he takes her to a “kill house” on base where SEALs rush in, firing at pop-up targets all around them. Claire is angry at Curran for putting her in danger, but he wanted her to experience being in the midst of gunfire. When Dale Hawkins sees James Curran and Claire Vareens at a restaurant, he telephones headquarters, identifies himself as Capt. Dunn, and asks them to beep Lt. Curran. Hawkins sits down with the couple and insults Claire by referring to Arabs as “rag heads” and comparing the Middle East to a toilet. Receiving “Capt. Dunn’s” telephone call from headquarters, Curran rushes out and asks Hawkins to give Claire a ride home. Hawkins tries to romance her, but she has no interest in him. The next day, a newscast reports that terrorists in Spain used an American Stinger to shoot down a private jet carrying an Algerian negotiating committee. Curran hurries to Claire’s apartment and demands she help before terrorists shoot down any more airplanes. She refuses to volunteer, but tells him to ask questions and she will tell him what she knows. At a beach house, Curran and Hawkins show her photographs. One is of Ben Shaheed’s go-between at Claire’s interview, but she tell him the man disappeared six months earlier and was probably kidnapped by Israelis. Hawkins suggests that maybe the SEALs should also kidnap terrorists and make them talk, but Claire explains they are religious zealots who do not respond to torture or coercion. Nonetheless, Naval Intelligence decides to kidnap a terrorist-related official named Ali. The SEALs study a scale model of a terrorist compound and rehearse their attack. They parachute from an airplane, land offshore, and swim to a coastal town. Several SEALs grab Ali, but when Hawkins gets trigger-happy and creates a firefight, Graham is killed. Back in Virginia, James Curran breaks the news to Jolena. After the military funeral, Curran tells Jolena her fiancé’s death was a training accident, but she does not believe him. Later, during a drunken wake, Curran blames Hawkins for Graham’s death because he was looking for a fight. When Claire goes to Curran’s houseboat, she finds him morose. She spends the night, and they make love. Later, aboard the U.S.S. Coral Sea off the coast of Lebanon, Lt. Curran tells Hawkins they are going to Beirut, where the Stinger missiles have been stored in a schoolhouse in the Shiite Muslim slums. Various militias are fighting among themselves, so the SEALs are told not to get involved. A helicopter drops them offshore at night and they reach the coast on motorized rafts. In Beirut, they are met a pro-American Druze guerrilla named Amal, who leads them to the schoolhouse. An infrared sensor alerts them that terrorists are on the third floor. Sneaking inside, they wire the crates with explosives. In the harbor, a submarine captain tells Capt. Dunn he can give the SEALs only twenty more minutes before he leaves, because the sun will soon rise and reveal the sub’s location. Near the schoolhouse, Curran is wounded in a firefight, and despite his orders to blow up the building, Hawkins insists on rescuing him first. A SEAL corpsman dresses Curran’s wounds so the SEALs can carry him with them. However, Ben Shaheed spots the SEALs hijacking a Mercedes-Benz and an armored vehicle chases them with machine guns and wrecks the car, but Leary, one of the SEALs, blows up the vehicle with a rocket launcher. Only four SEALs reach the beach and swim into the harbor. In an effort to stop them, Shaheed and his men commandeer a boat and try to run them over, but Hawkins tosses a hand grenade into the boat, destroying it. Shaheed fights with Hawkins underwater until the SEAL cuts his throat. The submarine surfaces and rescues them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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