Freckles (1935)

68-69 mins | Drama | 4 October 1935

Writer:

Dorothy Yost

Cinematographer:

Robert de Grasse

Production Designer:

Van Nest Polglase

Production Company:

RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
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HISTORY

Although this film was not viewed, the above credits were confirmed by a cutting continuity deposited with the copyright records. Author Gene Stratton Porter's name appears above the title in the opening credits. The NYT review credits Mary Mayes with the screen adaptation of Porter's novel. No other source, however, mentions Mayes. The NYT review also notes that Virginia Weidler does a "send up" of Shirley Temple in one scene in the picture. RKO borrowed Weidler from Paramount for this production.
In 1917, Marshall Neilan directed Jack Pickford and Louise Huff in a Paramount production of Porter's novel entitled Freckles . Leo Meehan directed John Fox, Jr. and Gene Stratton Porter in Freckles , a 1928 FBO Pictures version. A 1960 Fox version of the novel, also called Freckles , was directed by Andrew V. McLaglen and starred Martin West and Carol Christensen (see entries above and ... More Less

Although this film was not viewed, the above credits were confirmed by a cutting continuity deposited with the copyright records. Author Gene Stratton Porter's name appears above the title in the opening credits. The NYT review credits Mary Mayes with the screen adaptation of Porter's novel. No other source, however, mentions Mayes. The NYT review also notes that Virginia Weidler does a "send up" of Shirley Temple in one scene in the picture. RKO borrowed Weidler from Paramount for this production.
In 1917, Marshall Neilan directed Jack Pickford and Louise Huff in a Paramount production of Porter's novel entitled Freckles . Leo Meehan directed John Fox, Jr. and Gene Stratton Porter in Freckles , a 1928 FBO Pictures version. A 1960 Fox version of the novel, also called Freckles , was directed by Andrew V. McLaglen and starred Martin West and Carol Christensen (see entries above and below). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Sep 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Sep 35
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 35
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Aug 35
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 35
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
11 Sep 35
p. 16.
Motion Picture Herald
5 Oct 35
p. 45.
New York Times
26 Oct 35
p. 12.
Variety
30 Oct 35
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Pandro S. Berman Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Freckles by Gene Stratton-Porter (New York, 1904).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Gene Stratton Porter's Freckles
Release Date:
4 October 1935
Production Date:
mid July--early August 1935
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, inc.
Copyright Date:
4 October 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5850
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68-69
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1267
SYNOPSIS

While wandering in the Limberlost forest with her bear Cubby, young, mischievous Laurie-Lou Duncan meets Freckles, an unemployed orphan who is on his way to the nearby Mr. McLean Lumber Company. Laurie-Lou introduces Freckles to Mary Arden, her pretty schoolteacher, who then introduces him to McLean. At Mary's urging, McLean employs Freckles to guard the vast Limberlost against timber thieves. With Laurie-Lou's help, Freckles learns about the forest and gradually becomes comfortable in his new surroundings. At the same time, Mary gives Freckles botany books to read and, attracted to him, encourages him to visit her at home. After McLean runs into Jack Carter, a convicted timber thief, at Laurie-Lou's mother's general store, he alerts Freckles and his other workers to keep a careful watch on the trees. Carter, who gives Laurie-Lou wooden soldiers that he has carved, is actually hiding out in the Limberlost with fellow bank robbers Al Waters, Butch and Lefty. While McLean and his lumberjacks are cutting down a tree that had been marked by would-be timber thieves, Laurie-Lou ties Cubby to a log to prevent him from eating her candy. When Laurie-Lou realizes that the tree is going to fall near Cubby, she rushes to untie him but is pulled away by Freckles just as the giant trunk is descending on her. Cubby survives his injuries, and a relieved Laurie-Lou is able to participate in Mary's school variety show. Later Laurie-Lou, desperate to have Carter carve her a captain for her wooden doll collection, hides in his car one afternoon and rides with him to his cabin. Carter, whose photograph has just appeared in the newspapers, ... +


While wandering in the Limberlost forest with her bear Cubby, young, mischievous Laurie-Lou Duncan meets Freckles, an unemployed orphan who is on his way to the nearby Mr. McLean Lumber Company. Laurie-Lou introduces Freckles to Mary Arden, her pretty schoolteacher, who then introduces him to McLean. At Mary's urging, McLean employs Freckles to guard the vast Limberlost against timber thieves. With Laurie-Lou's help, Freckles learns about the forest and gradually becomes comfortable in his new surroundings. At the same time, Mary gives Freckles botany books to read and, attracted to him, encourages him to visit her at home. After McLean runs into Jack Carter, a convicted timber thief, at Laurie-Lou's mother's general store, he alerts Freckles and his other workers to keep a careful watch on the trees. Carter, who gives Laurie-Lou wooden soldiers that he has carved, is actually hiding out in the Limberlost with fellow bank robbers Al Waters, Butch and Lefty. While McLean and his lumberjacks are cutting down a tree that had been marked by would-be timber thieves, Laurie-Lou ties Cubby to a log to prevent him from eating her candy. When Laurie-Lou realizes that the tree is going to fall near Cubby, she rushes to untie him but is pulled away by Freckles just as the giant trunk is descending on her. Cubby survives his injuries, and a relieved Laurie-Lou is able to participate in Mary's school variety show. Later Laurie-Lou, desperate to have Carter carve her a captain for her wooden doll collection, hides in his car one afternoon and rides with him to his cabin. Carter, whose photograph has just appeared in the newspapers, keeps the innocent Laurie-Lou at the hideout, unsure of what to do with her. Eventually Freckles shows up and spots Laurie-Lou in the cabin. Carter and his men capture Freckles, but Freckles executes a surprise escape and, after being shot, locks himself with Laurie-Lou in a back room. When Laurie-Lou discovers Al's machine gun in the room, she shows Freckles how to load and shoot it. Although suffering, Freckles confronts Carter and his men, who have hacked their way into the room with axes, and holds them at gunpoint until Mary and an F.B.I. agent arrive on the scene. After Laurie-Lou congratulates Freckles for his bravery, Mary tells him that she loves him, and the young couple kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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