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HISTORY

End credits contain the following information: “We are especially indebted to the people in and around Archer City and Wichita Falls, Texas.”
       Texasville is a sequel to The Last Picture Show (see entry, 1971). Peter Bogdanovich, who directed both movies, used most of the earlier principals, with the exception of Ellen Burstyn and Clu Culager, who did not want to appear in Texasville, and Ben Johnson and Sam Bottoms, whose characters died in The Last Picture Show. (However, according to the 2 Aug 1989 SFChron, Ben Johnson was angry that Bogdanovich did not write him into the story with flashback scenes.) The 15 Oct 1989 LAT noted that Timothy Bottoms disliked the script and his fellow actors, and agreed to return for the sequel only because the producers allowed him to make a $100,000 behind-the-scenes documentary about both films. The only major character introduced in Texasville was “Karla Jackson,” wife of Jeff Bridges’s “Duane Jackson,” who was portrayed by Annie Potts, reportedly after actress Cheryl Ladd turned down the role, according to the 5 Jun 1989 Orange Country Register. Both films were shot in and around Archer City, TX, novelist Larry McMurtry’s hometown; in his novels, McMurtry called the town Thalia, but it was renamed Anarene in the films. Although the sequel was released nineteen years after the original, the time span between the two stories was roughly thirty-two years, from 1951-52 in The Last Picture Show to 1984 in Texasville.
       Producer Dino De Laurentiis originally bought the film rights to Texasville and did not want ... More Less

End credits contain the following information: “We are especially indebted to the people in and around Archer City and Wichita Falls, Texas.”
       Texasville is a sequel to The Last Picture Show (see entry, 1971). Peter Bogdanovich, who directed both movies, used most of the earlier principals, with the exception of Ellen Burstyn and Clu Culager, who did not want to appear in Texasville, and Ben Johnson and Sam Bottoms, whose characters died in The Last Picture Show. (However, according to the 2 Aug 1989 SFChron, Ben Johnson was angry that Bogdanovich did not write him into the story with flashback scenes.) The 15 Oct 1989 LAT noted that Timothy Bottoms disliked the script and his fellow actors, and agreed to return for the sequel only because the producers allowed him to make a $100,000 behind-the-scenes documentary about both films. The only major character introduced in Texasville was “Karla Jackson,” wife of Jeff Bridges’s “Duane Jackson,” who was portrayed by Annie Potts, reportedly after actress Cheryl Ladd turned down the role, according to the 5 Jun 1989 Orange Country Register. Both films were shot in and around Archer City, TX, novelist Larry McMurtry’s hometown; in his novels, McMurtry called the town Thalia, but it was renamed Anarene in the films. Although the sequel was released nineteen years after the original, the time span between the two stories was roughly thirty-two years, from 1951-52 in The Last Picture Show to 1984 in Texasville.
       Producer Dino De Laurentiis originally bought the film rights to Texasville and did not want Peter Bogdanovich to direct, the 21 Nov 1987 Montreal Gazette noted. However, when Cybill Shepherd refused to reprise her role as “Jacy Farrow” without Bogdanovich, De Laurentiis sold the rights to him. Because of a streak of unsuccessful films, Bogdanovich could not convince a major studio to commit to the project’s $18-million budget, the 15 Oct 1989 LAT reported. He was forced to get “independent financing from Nelson Entertainment and financial guarantees from Cine-Source.” Fortunately, Nelson Entertainment already had a distribution partnership with Columbia Pictures. The Last Picture Show cost only $1.3 million because none of the actors were stars, but by 1989, Jeff Bridges and Cybill Shepherd were big names. Each of their salaries—Bridges’s $1.75 million and Shepherd’s $1.5 million—was bigger than the first film’s total budget.
       Principal photography began 15 Aug 1989 without an agreement with the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE), according to the 16 Aug 1989 Var and 19 Oct 1989 DV, but producers signed a contract after many of the crew members agreed to join the union. The 5 Oct 1990 HR noted that Texasville employed more than 7,000 Texans from the Wichita Falls/Archer City area and added $4.6 million to the local economy. Peter Bogdanovich stated that Archer City was “very much a leading character in the picture.”
       Although Jeff Bridges’s “Duane Jackson” (“Duane Moore” in the novels) was secondary to Timothy Bottoms’s “Sonny Crawford” in The Last Picture Show, he was the primary character in Texasville and present in nearly every scene. The 27 Aug 1990 LAT noted that Bridges gained thirty-five pounds for the role. Duane “was 10 years older than I am,” Bridges said. “I needed weight for the age factor and for the shape he would be in after the kind of food he must have been eating.”
       Adam Englund, who played minor character “Ed Belt,” was the son of Cloris Leachman, the 7 Oct 1989 Toronto Star noted.
       The film premiered 22 Sep 1990 in North Dallas, TX, the 23 Sep 1990 Austin American Statesman reported, and was released nationally six days later. Columbia Pictures planned to reissue Bogdanovich’s re-cut of The Last Picture Show as a prequel “just a few weeks later.” The re-cut version contained “six minutes of outtakes,” including a scene in which Clu Gulager has sex with Cybill Shepherd on a pool table. Bogdanovich told the 27 Aug 1990 Orlando Sentinel that the re-edited version “explains why some of the characters do some of the things they do.”
       Texasville received mixed reviews and suffered comparisons with its predecessor, which had been nominated for eight Academy Awards and won two; Texasville did not receive any nominations. The 8 Oct 1990 Var announced that it “fared poorly in its opening round.” According to the 22 Oct 1990 DV, the film’s “disappointing performance…at the boxoffice” inspired Bogdanovich to plead with Columbia Pictures to re-release Texasville with The Last Picture Show as a double bill.
       End credits provide the following acknowledgments: “Special thanks to Steve Blauner; John Cassavetes; Larry McMurtry; David Scott Milton; Sal Mineo; Polly Platt; Bob Rafelson; Peggy Robertson; Bert Schneider.” “Many thanks to John Davis; David Hensley; Rusty Lindeman; Sheriff P. L. Pippin, Jr.; Esther Williams Swimming Pools; Guess by Georges Marciano; KAUX Channel 6; Tony Lama Boots; Lingerie by Victoria's Secret; Kritzia; Dailies projection system by Boston Light and Sound, Inc.; Woodson Lincoln Mercury, Inc.; Ron Roberts Ford; Texas Film Commission; Board of Commerce and Industry, Wichita Falls, Texas; and special thanks to Frank Zazza for promotional and product support.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Austin American Statesman
23 Sep 1990
Section B, p. 1
Boston Globe
3 May 1987
p. 111
Daily Variety
19 Oct 1989.
p. 3
Daily Variety
8 Nov 1989
p. 13
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1990
p. 2, 16
Daily Variety
22 Oct 1990
p. 3
Daily Variety
1 Nov 1990
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 1990
p. 6, 72
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 1990.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
21 Sep 1987.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
7 Jan 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
9 Jul 1989
Calendar, p. 32
Los Angeles Times
15 Oct 1989
Calendar, p. 22
Los Angeles Times
27 Aug 1990
Calendar, p. 10
Los Angeles Times
28 Sep 1990
Calendar, p. 1
New York Times
28 Sep 1990
p. 1
Orange County Register
5 Jun 1989
Section F, p. 4
Orlando Sentinel (Florida)
27 Aug 1990
Section A, p. 2
San Francisco Chronicle
2 Aug 1989
Section E, p. 1
The Gazette (Montreal)
21 Nov 1987
Section J, p. 3
Toronto Star
7 Oct 1989
Section S, p. 16
Variety
16 Aug 1989
p. 27
Variety
24 Sep 1990
p. 82
Variety
8 Oct 1990
p. 14
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Nelson Entertainment Presents
In Association with Cine-Source
A Peter Bogdanovich Picture
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Supv prod
Supv prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Addl cam unit
Addl cam unit
Addl cam unit
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Spec photog
Grip
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Grip and elec equip
ART DIRECTORS
Art dept asst
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Post prod supv
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Set dec
On set dresser
Leadman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Cost des
Costumer for Ms. Shepherd
Men`s ward
Women's ward
Ward asst
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd mixr
Prod sd mixr
Boom op
Cable person
Supv sd ed
Sd supv
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Re-rec
Re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Title des
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Makeup artist for Ms. Shepard
Hairstylist for Ms. Shepherd
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod supv
Prod assoc
Exec assoc
Scr supv
Jake's trainer
Handler
Loc coord
Loc coord
Asst to Mr. Bogdanovich
Asst to Mr. Spikings
Asst to Ms. Shepherd
Prod coord
Prod secy
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Legal asst
Transportation coord
Capt
Shotmaker op
Prod van op
Picture car coord
Picture car coord
Craft service
Teacher
Set nurse
Set nurse
Extras casting
Extras casting
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Caterer
Film processing
Completion bond
Payroll service
Prod legal services
COLOR PERSONNEL
Film processing
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Texasville by Larry McMurtry (New York, 1987).
SONGS
Courtesy of CBS Records, Music Licensing Department: “On The Sunny Side Of The Street,” written by Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields, published by Ireneadele Publishing Co., Aldi Music Co., Shapiro Bemstein & Co. Inc. (ASCAP), performed by Willie Nelson
“September Song,” written by Maxwell Anderson and Kurt Weill, published by Chappell & Co. Inc./Hampshire House Publishing Co. (ASCAP), performed by Willie Nelson
“Stardust,” written by Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish, published by Mills Music, Inc. and Hoagy Publishing Co. (ASCAP), performed by Willie Nelson
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SONGS
Courtesy of CBS Records, Music Licensing Department: “On The Sunny Side Of The Street,” written by Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields, published by Ireneadele Publishing Co., Aldi Music Co., Shapiro Bemstein & Co. Inc. (ASCAP), performed by Willie Nelson
“September Song,” written by Maxwell Anderson and Kurt Weill, published by Chappell & Co. Inc./Hampshire House Publishing Co. (ASCAP), performed by Willie Nelson
“Stardust,” written by Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish, published by Mills Music, Inc. and Hoagy Publishing Co. (ASCAP), performed by Willie Nelson
“City Of New Orleans,” written by Steve Goodman, published by Red Pajamas Music/EMI U Catalog Inc. (ASCAP), performed by Willie Nelson
“Dancing In The Dark,” written by Bruce Springsteen, published by Bruce Springsteen Music (ASCAP), performed by Bruce Springsteen
“No Surrender,” written by Bruce Springsteen, published by Bruce Springsteen Music (ASCAP), performed by Bruce Springsteen
“Highway Patrolman,” written by Bruce Springsteen, published by Bruce Springsteen Music (ASCAP), performed by Johnny Cash
“Let’s Leave The Lights On Tonight,” written by Rory Michael Bourke and Bob McDill, published by Chappell & Co., PolyGram International Publishing, Inc. (ASCAP), performed by Johnny Rodriguez
“How Could I Love Her So Much,” written by Hugh Moffat, published by Atlantic Music Corp./Boquillas Canyon Music (BMI), performed by Johnny Rodriguez
“Seven Year Ache,” written by Rosanne Cash, published by Atlantic Music Corp/Hotwire Music (FMI), performed by Rosanne Cash
“No Memories Hanging Round,” written by Rodney Crowell, published by Granite Music Corp./Coolwell Music (BMI), performed by Rosanne Cash and Bobby Bare. Courtesy of Sire Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products: “Material Girl,” written by Peter Brown and Robert Rans, published by Miniong Publishing (BMI), performed by Madonna. Courtesy of RCA Records: “Good Hearted Woman,” written by Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson, published by Songs of Polygram, Inc., Willie Nelson Music (BMI), performed by Willie Nelson
“Luckenbach, Texas (Back To The Basics Of Love),” written by Bobby Emmons and Chips Moman, published by Tree Publishing Corp./Songs of Polygram International, Inc. (BMI), performed by Waylon Jennings
“I Got Mexico,” written by Eddy Raven and Frank Myers, published by Michael H. Goldsen, Inc./Ravensong Music (ASCAP), performed by Eddy Raven. Courtesy of Bluebird/RCA Records: “Basin Street Blues,” written by Spencer Williams, published by Edwin H. Morris & Company (ASCAP), a division of MPL Communications, Inc., performed by Louis Armstrong
“He’s A Son Of The South,” written by Andy Razaf, Joe Davis and Reginald Foresythe, published by Razaf Music/Joe Davis Music Publishing/Edwin H. Morris & Company (ASCAP), a division of MPL Communications, Inc., performed by Louis Armstrong. Courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets: “Queen Of Hearts,” written by Hank DeVito, published by Drunk Monkey Music (ASCAP), administered by Bug Music, performed by Juice Newton
“Adios Mi Corazon,” written by Otha Young, published by Oh The Music (BMI), performed by Juice Newton
“Ride ’Em Cowboy,” written by Paul Davis, published by Web IV Music (BMI), performed by Juice Newton. Courtesy of Chrysalis Records, Inc.: “Hell Is For Children,” written by Neil Geraldo, Pat Benatar and Roger Capps, published by Neil Geraldo Music/Muscle Tone Music/Big Tooth Music/Chrysalis Music (ASCAP), performed by Pat Benatar. Courtesy of MCA Records: “Heartbreak,” written by John Klemmer, published by Remohj Music (BMI), performed by John Klemmer
“Barefoot Ballet,” written by John Klemmer, published by Remohj Music (BMI), performed by John Klemmer
“He Broke Your Memory Last Night,” written by Bucky Jones and Dickey Lee, published by Cross Keys Publishing/Songs of PolyGram International, Inc. (BMI), performed by Reba McEntire. Courtesy of Virgin Records: “Karma Chameleon,” written by George O'Dowd, John Moss, Mikey Craig and Roy Hay, published by Virgin Music, Inc./Warner/Tamerlane Publishing Corp. (BMI), performed by Culture Club. Courtesy of Crescent Moon Music: “I Don’t Think I Could Take You Back Again,” written by Earl Poole Ball and Jo-El Sonnier, published by Buttercreek Music (BMI)/Wall to Wall Music (ASCAP)
performed by Earl Poole Ball and Jo-El Sonnier
“One Day Since Yesterday,” written by Peter Bogdanovich and Earl Poole Ball, published by House of Cash and Crescent Moon Music (BMI), performed by Colleen Camp. Courtesy of Alshire International, Inc.: “The Stars And Stripes Forever,” written by John Philip Sousa, arranged by E. L. Jefe, published by Daval Music Company (ASCAP), performed by Pride of the ’48
“The Yellow Rose Of Texas,” written by John Philip Sousa, arranged by R. W. Lowden, published by Daval Music Company (ASCAP), performed by The All Star Interconference Band. Traditional music performed by Phil Marshall. “Stay All Night,” written by Tommy Duncan, published by Warner/Electra/Asylum Music, Inc., performed by Texas Knights Dance Band
“Southwestern Overture,” written by Larry Archambo, published by Archambo Music, performed by Midwestern State Band
“Rhapsody,” written by Laurie Johnson, published by KPM Music/Associated Production Music (ASCAP), courtesy of Associated Production Music. Courtesy of PolyGram Special Products, a division of PolyGram Reocrds, Inc.: “Kaw-Liga,” written by Hank Williams and Fred Rose, published by Milene Music Inc./Rightsong Music (ASCAP), performed by Hank Williams. Courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products: “Lovesick Blues,” written by Cliff Friend and Irving Mills, published by Mills Music, Inc. (ASCAP) , performed by Hank Williams, Jr.
“Till I Gain Control,” written by Rodney Crowell, published by Jolly Cheeks Music (BMI), performed by Crystal Gayle
“In My Dreams,” written by Paul Kennerly, published by Irving Music, Inc. (BMI), performed by Emmylou Harris
“Long Hard Road (The Sharecropper’s Dream)," written by Rodney Crowell, published by Granite Music Corp./Coolwell Music (ASCAP) performed by The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
28 September 1990
Premiere Information:
North Dallas, TX premiere: 22 September 1990
Los Angeles opening: 28 September 1990
New York opening: week of 28 September 1990
Production Date:
began 15 August 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Nelson Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
29 October 1990
Copyright Number:
PA490126
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Color
Color by Deluxe®
Lenses
Lenses and Panavision Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
125
Length(in feet):
11,286
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30287
SYNOPSIS

In Anarene, Texas, in the summer of 1984, Duane Jackson sits in his hot tub shooting at “Shorty’s” doghouse. Later, with Shorty at his side, Duane drives his pickup truck to his oil company headquarters. Office manager Ruth Popper brings him up to date on bills and payments. Duane receives a telephone call from banker Lester Marlow, who laments that his wife, Marylou, left him. He wants Duane to talk to her, and Duane predicts he will see Marylou that evening at the Old Texas Centennial committee meeting. Ruth comments that Marylou Marlow’s departure adds yet another “footloose” woman to the town’s population, which includes Suzie Nolan, “Junior” Nolan’s wife. As Ruth gives Duane a bank check to take to Lester, she suggests that he visit Jacy Farrow, his high school girl friend, who is back in town after many years, grieving for a dead child. Duane drives past Anarene’s old movie theater, which is falling down after thirty years of neglect. As Duane arrives at the Dairy Queen restaurant, Lavelle Bates and Charlene Duggs agree that he still looks good despite his weight gain since his high school football days. He sits down with Junior Nolan and other friends to talk about sex and the falling price of oil, which has turned their boom into a bust. Sonny Crawford, town mayor and owner of the Kwik Sack market, tells Duane that Jacy, the girl they shared in high school, stopped by his store and still looks good. Karla Jackson walks in as Charlene lays her hands on Duane’s shoulders. Charlene pulls away and leaves with Lavelle. A telephone call from the sheriff informs Duane that his son, Dickie, ... +


In Anarene, Texas, in the summer of 1984, Duane Jackson sits in his hot tub shooting at “Shorty’s” doghouse. Later, with Shorty at his side, Duane drives his pickup truck to his oil company headquarters. Office manager Ruth Popper brings him up to date on bills and payments. Duane receives a telephone call from banker Lester Marlow, who laments that his wife, Marylou, left him. He wants Duane to talk to her, and Duane predicts he will see Marylou that evening at the Old Texas Centennial committee meeting. Ruth comments that Marylou Marlow’s departure adds yet another “footloose” woman to the town’s population, which includes Suzie Nolan, “Junior” Nolan’s wife. As Ruth gives Duane a bank check to take to Lester, she suggests that he visit Jacy Farrow, his high school girl friend, who is back in town after many years, grieving for a dead child. Duane drives past Anarene’s old movie theater, which is falling down after thirty years of neglect. As Duane arrives at the Dairy Queen restaurant, Lavelle Bates and Charlene Duggs agree that he still looks good despite his weight gain since his high school football days. He sits down with Junior Nolan and other friends to talk about sex and the falling price of oil, which has turned their boom into a bust. Sonny Crawford, town mayor and owner of the Kwik Sack market, tells Duane that Jacy, the girl they shared in high school, stopped by his store and still looks good. Karla Jackson walks in as Charlene lays her hands on Duane’s shoulders. Charlene pulls away and leaves with Lavelle. A telephone call from the sheriff informs Duane that his son, Dickie, was arrested again for speeding. Duane drives past Jacy’s house, but does not stop. After visiting his oilrig to get his men working, he drives to the jail and takes custody of his son. Approaching the Jackson home, Dickie sees his fiancée Billie Anne’s truck outside and tells his father he cannot go inside, because she knows he has been sleeping with Suzie Nolan and Marylou Marlow, the wives of Junior and Lester. Dickie takes the wheel and drives away in Duane’s truck. In the back yard, Duane finds Karla, Billie Anne, and Minerva, the Jackson family’s African American housekeeper, firing guns at balloons. Duane and Karla’s daughter, Nellie, and grandson “Little Mike,” are also there. Karla tells Duane that Lester Marlow is in the hospital after a suicide attempt, and Junior Nolan was seen buying ammunition. At that moment, Junior arrives with a rifle, looking for Dickie. Billie Anne chambers a round in her rifle, but Duane convinces them both to lay down their weapons. Junior realizes he is hungry. He and Karla decide to eat at the Dairy Queen, while Duane goes to the centennial meeting. The first order of business is whether to celebrate Archer County’s first town, Texasville, by building an Old West replica, but the Reverend G. G. Rawley shouts them down because Texasville consisted of nothing but saloons and whorehouses. Over the preacher’s objections, the committee votes for a small Texasville facade on the courthouse square during festivities. When Duane visits Lester Marlow in the hospital, Lester wonders if he will be raped in prison, but Duane assures him he will receive community service or a short term in a “country club prison.” Lester worries about what Marylou does at night. Suzie Nolan, high on cocaine, confronts Duane as he leaves the hospital and cries that his son, Dickie, does not love her. She drags Duane into her car, but before they can have sex, a woman drives up and tells them her father, “Old Man” Bolt, the oldest man in Archer County, fell out of the car. Duane, Lester, and Suzie accompany the ambulance driver to the accident scene, but the old man is uninjured. Duane telephones Lavelle to call off their tryst that night, then drives to the lake to sleep in privacy on his boat. In the morning, Jacy Farrow swims across the lake and stops at the boat, but does not recognize Duane until he identifies himself. They discuss old times, and when Duane mentions that he often drives past her house, Jacy tells him to ring her doorbell next time, then swims away. Duane goes home to find that his young twins, Jack and Julie, have been kicked out of Holy Days Church Camp and he must get them. At the Dairy Queen, Lester's wife, Marylou Marlow, asks Duane if she can drive to the church camp with him. On the way, she confesses that his son, Dickie, has impregnated her. At the camp, the twins, Jack and Julie, proclaim their innocence. Later, Duane drives to Suzie Nolan's for sex. At the Dairy Queen, he sees that Jacy has joined Karla, Dickie, Billie Anne, Minerva, and the kids. When Karla tells him she bought Dickie and Billie Anne a house, Duane reminds her that he is $12 million in debt. The kids are curious about Jacy’s career as a movie actress in Italy. As Jacy leaves, Duane watches her, and Karla watches him. Later, Marylou Marlow asks Duane to play Adam in her upcoming pageant, and wonders if Jacy would play Eve. Duane looks at photographs of himself and Jacy in the 1952 high school yearbook. Karla hears that he is having an affair with Suzie, but Duane denies it. Hearing that Sonny Crawford is missing, Duane goes to the Kwik Sack and finds the sheriff putting together a search party. Duane and Karla go to Sonny’s room at the hotel and find it empty, but from the window they see him sitting on the roof of the old movie theater. Sonny tells them he was watching a movie in his brain. They drive him to a neurological center for tests. Lavelle tearfully telephones Duane at the office to tell him she is pregnant by Lester, but Marylou refuses to divorce him because she is also pregnant. On his way out of town on a trip to Odessa, Texas, Duane sees Jacy’s car at the Dairy Queen and stops. Jacy agrees to drive him and Shorty in her Mercedes because she has never been to Odessa. He admits that he has to see a banker, because he is $12 million in debt. Duane drops Jacy and Shorty at a motel, while he conducts business. The deal is inconclusive, and they return to Archer County. When they part company at the Dairy Queen, Jacy asks Duane to let her have Shorty the dog, and he agrees. She tells him to tell Suzie that she will play Eve in the pageant. When Duane gets home, Billie Anne is crying because Dickie smashed up their furniture. Karla informs Duane the bank “called Junior’s notes,” which means it could also call Duane’s at any time. Ruth Popper tells Duane that Sonny avoids him because Sonny never achieved the success that Duane did during the oil boom, but Duane reminds her that Sonny Crawford is the mayor and owns the hotel and the Kwik Sack, whereas Duane is $12 million in debt. He is the one who should be sad. Duane drives past Jacy's house and sees Dickie’s truck parked outside. Shorty chases after him, and Duane lets the dog in the truck. He drives to his oilrig and finds his workers target-practicing. He drives past Jacy's again, and lets Shorty out of the truck. Finding Dickie at home reading a book about Italy, Duane hits him. They briefly struggle, then Duane, out of breath, apologizes. Dickie explains that Billie Anne lied about him trashing the furniture, and that Jacy suggested he should leave her and stay at Jacy’s house in Italy. Duane stops at the Kwik Sack to see Sonny. Doctors gave him some pills, and he has not lost his car lately, but he would rather watch movies in the sky. When Duane goes home, Minerva informs him that everyone is at Jacy’s. The Jackson family arrives at the opening of the centennial celebration. Duane and Jacy practice their Adam and Eve skit, which brings back memories of her being the homecoming queen and him the football hero. Lee Roy tells Duane the oil well has hit something. When he goes home, Karla tells him that Junior Nolan and Billie Anne ran off together, and Dickie has filed for divorce. Jacy has offered to take Karla and the twins to Europe, and has explained all of Duane’s problems to her. Duane knows nothing about women. Karla could be having some once-in-a-lifetime feeling while sitting next to him, and he would never notice. The newspaper reports that Saudi Arabia is going to reduce the price of oil to $5 a barrel. At the centennial parade, Lester Marlow sits on a float pointing a gun at his head and clicking the trigger. Jacy is the queen and invites Duane to join her as the king. “Old Man” Bolt is wired to a horse for a ride around the rodeo rink, but he starts to tilt. Both Duane and Dickie run to save him, but Duane falls and breaks several ribs. In the Adam and Eve skit, Jacy grabs Duane and kisses him, to Sonny’s dismay. She takes Duane to the hospital to get his ribs bandaged. Meanwhile, Sonny hears an old voice from Ruth Popper, who tells him to pull into her garage. He crashes into a house located where the garage once stood. When Duane and Karla take Sonny to the Dairy Queen, he claims he did not see the house there. It used to be a garage where he and Ruth parked. They invite him to stay at their house, but Sonny prefers jail. The next day, Jacy, Karla, and Duane go to the Kwik Sack to cheer him up, but Sonny claims that he is the town failure and Duane is the town success, so how could they ever be best friends? Karla wonders if she is a loser, too. Otherwise, why would Duane sleep with all his tacky girl friends? Returning to the office, Duane finds Ruth packing. She informs him he is broke. When he asks why Sonny is living in her trailer, Ruth explains that he once saved her. Duane goes home and finds his family at the dinner table. Jacy is drunk and depressed about her son who was killed in an accident in Italy. That final night at the centennial, Duane gets drunk and watches Jacy dance with Dickie. The twins sneak into the back of a truck and steal dozens of boxes of eggs. Reverend Rawley arrives with a sledgehammer to knock down the Texasville facade, but kids run upstairs in the courthouse and bombard him with eggs. An egg fight spreads through the festivities. Duane walks to the lake, and does not return home until morning. Karla invites him into the bedroom, where they make love. Afterward, the family goes to the Dairy Queen, but Ruth arrives to announce that Sonny is missing. They find him sitting at the top of the bleachers of the rodeo rink. Duane and Ruth stop him from falling, and they all go to the Dairy Queen for breakfast. Watching the twins on bikes, Jacy grabs Duane and cries on his shoulder. Julie Jackson runs to hug Sonny, and Ruth and Genevieve Morgan, the Kwik Sack clerk, put him in the car.
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.