All I Want for Christmas (1991)

G | 92 mins | Comedy, Romance, Adventure | 8 November 1991

Director:

Robert Lieberman

Producer:

Marykay Powell

Cinematographer:

Robbie Greenberg

Production Designer:

Herman Zimmerman

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures
Full page view
HISTORY

According to a 14 Jun 1991 article in DV, writer-director Thom Eberhardt was set to direct the film, which had two working titles, Home For Christmas and Home For the Holidays. One month later, various sources reported that Eberhardt had been replaced by director-producer Robert Lieberman, who was known primarily for television and commercial work. On 24 Jul 1991, HR stated that the picture was being rushed into production by Brandon Tartikoff, a former television executive and Paramount Pictures’ new chairman, with the goal of a 1991, rather than 1992, holiday-season opening. The picture, referred to by its release title, All I Want For Christmas, would be his first for the studio. An 18 Jul 1991 DV news item cited the short shooting schedule as cause for Eberhardt’s amicable departure.
       DV acknowledged Gail Parent and Neal Israel as co-writers of Eberhardt’s original script. However, with Eberhardt’s departure, Richard Kramer was brought on to “polish” the script, according to the HR on 24 Jul 1991. Eberhardt and Kramer share onscreen writing credit, but Parent and Israel are not listed in the film’s credits.
       Several contemporary sources confirmed that principal photography on All I Want for Christmas began in late Jul 1991 in Los Angeles, California. Filming concluded approximately one month later. With a release date set for 8 Nov 1991, this allowed two months for post-production. The short schedule raised concern at the Directors Guild of America (DGA), according to a 5 Aug 1991 Var news brief, and an inquiry into whether or not any DGA rules had been ... More Less

According to a 14 Jun 1991 article in DV, writer-director Thom Eberhardt was set to direct the film, which had two working titles, Home For Christmas and Home For the Holidays. One month later, various sources reported that Eberhardt had been replaced by director-producer Robert Lieberman, who was known primarily for television and commercial work. On 24 Jul 1991, HR stated that the picture was being rushed into production by Brandon Tartikoff, a former television executive and Paramount Pictures’ new chairman, with the goal of a 1991, rather than 1992, holiday-season opening. The picture, referred to by its release title, All I Want For Christmas, would be his first for the studio. An 18 Jul 1991 DV news item cited the short shooting schedule as cause for Eberhardt’s amicable departure.
       DV acknowledged Gail Parent and Neal Israel as co-writers of Eberhardt’s original script. However, with Eberhardt’s departure, Richard Kramer was brought on to “polish” the script, according to the HR on 24 Jul 1991. Eberhardt and Kramer share onscreen writing credit, but Parent and Israel are not listed in the film’s credits.
       Several contemporary sources confirmed that principal photography on All I Want for Christmas began in late Jul 1991 in Los Angeles, California. Filming concluded approximately one month later. With a release date set for 8 Nov 1991, this allowed two months for post-production. The short schedule raised concern at the Directors Guild of America (DGA), according to a 5 Aug 1991 Var news brief, and an inquiry into whether or not any DGA rules had been violated was conducted. In an interview with the LAT on 27 Oct 1991, producer Marykay Powell stated that the $12 million budget was not the cause of the speedy pace of production.
       Although most of the picture was shot on the Paramount Pictures lot, some scenes were filmed on location at the I. Magnin department store on Wilshire Boulevard. According to studio production notes, the historic building in Los Angeles was intended to stand in for the Macy’s on 34th Street and Herald Square in New York City, the same Macy’s featured in the holiday classic, Miracle On 34th Street (1947, see entry).
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “The producers with to thank: Macy’s; Polo Ralph Lauren for Boys; C & R Clothiers; Sports Illustrated Photo/Walter Iooss; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; “Nutcracker” footage courtesy of AEG Acquisition Corp.; Ben & Jerry’s® truck design by Woody Jackson; Tesla DSP; Bliss.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Jun 1991
p. 1, 55.
Daily Variety
18 Jul 1991
p. 1, 21.
Daily Variety
8 Nov 1991
p. 2, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1991
p. 1, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 1991
p. 10, 15.
Los Angeles Times
27 Oct 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Nov 1991
Calendar, p. 8.
New York Times
8 Nov 1991
Section C, p. 14.
Variety
5 Aug 1991.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Paramount Pictures presents
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Film loader
Video asst
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Elec lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
Elec lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Elec
24 frame video displays by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Post-production supv
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Lead person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop master
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Gen foreperson
Greensperson
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Cost supv
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus supv
Mus editing
Orch conducted by
Orch
Score recorded at
Mus scoring mixer
Orch contractor
Mus preparation
Mus prod set supv
Mus prod set supv
Mus coord
Mus coord
SOUND
Boom op
Boom op
Cableperson
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Dolby stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Asst spec eff
Titles and opt eff by
Matte painting by
Supv matte photog, Matte World
Matte artist supv, Matte World
Exec of project management, Matte World
Matte artist, Matte World
Matte artist, Matte World
Cam op, Matte World
Cam asst, Matte World
New York research, Matte World
Matte reference photog, Matte World
DANCE
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Makeup for Ms. Bacall
Makeup for Mr. Nielsen
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist for Ms. Bacall
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod office coord
Asst prod office coord
Prod secretary
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
3d asst prod accountant
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst to Mr. Lieberman
Asst to Mr. Rogow
Asst to Mr. Powell and Ms. Herman
Asst to Mr. Kramer
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Unit pub
Craft service
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Children's acting coach
Studio teacher
Casting assoc
Extras casting by
Catering
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"All I Want," music by David Foster, lyric by Linda Thompson, performed by Stephen Bishop, produced by David Foster
"Baby, It's Cold Outside," by Frank Loesser
"Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas," by Hugh Martin & Ralph Blane
+
SONGS
"All I Want," music by David Foster, lyric by Linda Thompson, performed by Stephen Bishop, produced by David Foster
"Baby, It's Cold Outside," by Frank Loesser
"Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas," by Hugh Martin & Ralph Blane
"Heart And Soul," by Frank Loesser & Hoagy Carmichael
"I Love You Truly," by Carrie Jacobs-Bond
"She's My Cutie," by T. Edmond, K. White & J. Clay, performed by K. M. C. Kru, courtesy of Curb Records
"Silver Bells," by Jay Livingston & Ray Evans
"Sleepwalk," by Ann Farina, John Farina & Santo Farina, performed by Santo & Johnny, courtesy of Dischi Ricordi, by arrangement with Celebrity Licensing
"Stagger Lee," by Harold Logan & Lloyd Price, performed by Lloyd Price, courtesy of MCA Records
"Under The Christmas Tree," by Albert Hammond & John Bettis, performed by Bob Gulley, produced by Bill Medley
"Yakety Yak," by Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller, performed by The Coasters, courtesy of Atco Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Home For Christmas
Home For the Holidays
Release Date:
8 November 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 8 November 1991
Production Date:
late July--late August 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
16 December 1991
Copyright Number:
PA547016
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
92
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31309
SYNOPSIS

New York City bustles with holiday cheer, and teenager Ethan O’Fallon rushes to choir practice, arriving just in time to sing his solo. After rehearsal, the prep school boys discuss what they want for Christmas, but Ethan is subdued, noting that it will be the first Christmas since his parents' divorce. He then meets up with his seven-year-old sister Hallie, who dreams of visiting the “real” Santa at Macy’s. The children walk along snow-covered sidewalks to a posh townhome on the Upper East Side, where Lillian Brooks, their grandmother, is decorating her Christmas tree. Lillian welcomes the youngsters home. Moments later, Catherine O’Fallon, their mother, arrives after a day at the office and reminds them that their father will be picking them up at any moment. Hours later, their father, Michael O’Fallon, knocks on the door, and Catherine argues with him about his carefree lifestyle. On his way out with the children, Michael meets Catherine’s boyfriend, a Wall Street executive named Tony Boer. Michael is chagrined by the encounter, until Ethan and Hallie enthusiastically suggest going to their father’s diner in lower Manhattan. There, they spend the evening serving burgers and milkshakes to a boisterous crowd. Later that night, Hallie tells Ethan that she plans to ask Santa to get her parents back together. Ethan tries to convince her that Santa does not grant that kind of wish, but Hallie is undeterred. In the morning, she insists that Ethan take her to Macy’s, where she makes her request to Santa. Later, their grandmother throws a holiday party, and Ethan falls head-over-heels for Stephanie, the teenage daughter of his mother’s colleague. He is unable to take his eyes off Stephanie, ... +


New York City bustles with holiday cheer, and teenager Ethan O’Fallon rushes to choir practice, arriving just in time to sing his solo. After rehearsal, the prep school boys discuss what they want for Christmas, but Ethan is subdued, noting that it will be the first Christmas since his parents' divorce. He then meets up with his seven-year-old sister Hallie, who dreams of visiting the “real” Santa at Macy’s. The children walk along snow-covered sidewalks to a posh townhome on the Upper East Side, where Lillian Brooks, their grandmother, is decorating her Christmas tree. Lillian welcomes the youngsters home. Moments later, Catherine O’Fallon, their mother, arrives after a day at the office and reminds them that their father will be picking them up at any moment. Hours later, their father, Michael O’Fallon, knocks on the door, and Catherine argues with him about his carefree lifestyle. On his way out with the children, Michael meets Catherine’s boyfriend, a Wall Street executive named Tony Boer. Michael is chagrined by the encounter, until Ethan and Hallie enthusiastically suggest going to their father’s diner in lower Manhattan. There, they spend the evening serving burgers and milkshakes to a boisterous crowd. Later that night, Hallie tells Ethan that she plans to ask Santa to get her parents back together. Ethan tries to convince her that Santa does not grant that kind of wish, but Hallie is undeterred. In the morning, she insists that Ethan take her to Macy’s, where she makes her request to Santa. Later, their grandmother throws a holiday party, and Ethan falls head-over-heels for Stephanie, the teenage daughter of his mother’s colleague. He is unable to take his eyes off Stephanie, even while Lillian and Hallie sing a Christmas duet. The next day, at an art museum, Ethan intercepts an unsuspecting Stephanie, and the two teens bond over stories of their divorced parents. Meanwhile, back at Lillian’s townhome, Hallie overhears her mother state her intention to marry Tony. When Ethan returns, Hallie is frantic and tells him that although she asked Santa to help her parents “get married again,” she forgot to say “to each other.” With her mother now set on marrying Tony, Hallie berates herself for the mistake and wonders what they can do. That afternoon, before taking Hallie to a performance of The Nutcracker, Catherine and Tony drop Ethan off at the diner. Ethan convinces his mother to come inside. Catherine is surprised to see that the diner looks exactly like Brewster’s, her and Michael’s beloved college hangout. Although touched by the reminder, she tells Michael she plans to marry Tony. He offers congratulations, but later, over milkshakes and French fries, Michael confides to Ethan that he could have been a better husband and regrets not owning up to his shortcomings. That night, Ethan watches home movies of the once-happy family and falls asleep in tears. In the morning, Hallie leaves the house without supervision, determined to talk to Santa and “fix her mistake.” Ethan rushes to Macy’s to retrieve his sister and realizes it is up to him to make her wish come true. He meets with Stephanie and asks her to help with the plan to reunite his parents. The children try to thwart Catherine and Tony’s romance, scaring the wedding planner by letting mice loose in the house, and dispatching Tony in the back of an ice cream truck on Christmas Eve. Then, Hallie and Ethan scheme to bring their parents together. While at her father’s loft, Hallie pretends to be sick, causing her mother to rush over. Catherine falls asleep on the sofa with her ex-husband. Hallie sneaks out, leaving the two adults alone, and finds Stephanie and Ethan in the diner. The children celebrate their success by playing in the snow. However, the next morning, Catherine and Michael suspect a conspiracy and take a cab to Lillian Brooks’ townhome, seeking an explanation. Ethan confesses that the tricks were intended to reunite the family. When a belligerent Tony arrives and declares that the children should be reprimanded, Catherine calls off the engagement. She and Michael admit they still love each other and agree to give their marriage another try. Stephanie gives Ethan a surprise Christmas gift, kissing his cheek and professing her love for him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.