The Borrower (1991)

R | 99 mins | Horror, Science fiction | 27 September 1991

Director:

John McNaughton

Cinematographers:

Julio Macat, Robert New

Editor:

Elena Maganini

Production Designer:

Robert Henderson

Production Company:

Vision Pictures
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HISTORY

The 24 Feb 1988 Var reported that Jules Stein of Atlantic International Group was promoting four upcoming projects at the 1988 American Film Market in Los Angeles, CA, including The Borrower. Principal photography was scheduled to begin 23 May 1988, as stated in the 25 Feb 1988 DV.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filming began in Chicago, IL, where the story was set, but later moved to Los Angeles. The change of location was followed by seven rewrites of the screenplay and “difficulties in casting.” The spacecraft landing sequence, filmed in the San Fernando Valley, was reportedly plagued by an earthquake, windstorms and mudslides. Regardless, production was completed on schedule and within budget.
       The Borrower opened to positive reviews. The 27 Sep 1991 LAT praised McNaughton as “one of the best and most interesting” of contemporary “underground” filmmakers.
       End credits include the following statements: "Special thanks to Daniel H. Coleman, Donna Sheridan, Kurt Woolner, Stephen Ransohoff, Arthur F. Stribley, Jonathan Dana, Carol E. Burmeister, Bob Brandel, Paula Spang, Andrea Guttfreund, R.A.H. Producers Center, Chuck Pollack, Bob Hudecek, Pat Hart, Larry Park, Katherine Pearson and Thomas J. Coleman." The film carries a 1989 copyright ... More Less

The 24 Feb 1988 Var reported that Jules Stein of Atlantic International Group was promoting four upcoming projects at the 1988 American Film Market in Los Angeles, CA, including The Borrower. Principal photography was scheduled to begin 23 May 1988, as stated in the 25 Feb 1988 DV.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filming began in Chicago, IL, where the story was set, but later moved to Los Angeles. The change of location was followed by seven rewrites of the screenplay and “difficulties in casting.” The spacecraft landing sequence, filmed in the San Fernando Valley, was reportedly plagued by an earthquake, windstorms and mudslides. Regardless, production was completed on schedule and within budget.
       The Borrower opened to positive reviews. The 27 Sep 1991 LAT praised McNaughton as “one of the best and most interesting” of contemporary “underground” filmmakers.
       End credits include the following statements: "Special thanks to Daniel H. Coleman, Donna Sheridan, Kurt Woolner, Stephen Ransohoff, Arthur F. Stribley, Jonathan Dana, Carol E. Burmeister, Bob Brandel, Paula Spang, Andrea Guttfreund, R.A.H. Producers Center, Chuck Pollack, Bob Hudecek, Pat Hart, Larry Park, Katherine Pearson and Thomas J. Coleman." The film carries a 1989 copyright notice. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 Feb 1988
p. 1, 35, 36.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 1991
p. 5, 16.
Los Angeles Times
27 Sep 1991
p. 12.
New York Times
18 Oct 1991
p. 12.
Variety
24 Feb 1988.
---
Variety
9 Sep 1991
p. 67.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A John McNaughton Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Line prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Addl photog
Chicago photog
1st cam asst
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
2d cam asst
Still photog
Key grip
Best boy grip
Best boy grip
Grip
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Best boy elec
Best boy elec
Elec
Cam equip provided by
Grip and elec equip by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dresser
Leadman
On set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Set ward supv
MUSIC
Mus
Underscore rec at
Underscore rec at Minutemen Music Production, Inc.
Underscore rec at Minutemen Music Production, Inc.
Eng, Chicago Recording Company
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd eff
Specialty sd eff
ADR and Foley eng
ADR asst and Foley artist
Rerec eng
Rerec eng
Rerec asst
Rerec asst
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Models and motion control by
Models and sets, Sinnott & Associates
Models and sets, Sinnott & Associates
Models and sets, Sinnott & Associates
Motion control cam, Sinnott & Associates
Motion control cam, Sinnott & Associates
Illustration, Sinnott & Associates
Anim, Sinnott & Associates
Dir, Sinnott & Associates
Prod, Sinnott & Associates
Editorial, Sinnott & Associates
Title des
Anim cam
MAKEUP
Make-up eff created by
Makeup artist
Make-up asst
Make-up eff crew
Shop supv
Sculptor
Sculptor
Hair dept
Lab tech
Mechanical dept
Mechanical dept
Mechanical dept
Mechanical dept
Addl make-up eff crew
Addl make-up eff crew
Addl make-up eff crew
Addl make-up eff crew
Alien suit des by
Alien suit wrangler
Addl make-up eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst prod and post prod accountant
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Scr supv
Asst scr supv
2d unit scr supv
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Cam car driver
Driver
Driver
Loc mgr
Loc asst
Loc liaison
Chicago locations
Chicago liaison
Post prod facilities
Prod associate
Asst to Mr. McNaughton
2d unit prod coord
Set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Craft service
First aid
Prod intern
Prod intern
Casting asst
Casting asst
Extras casting
Chicago casting
Chicago casting
Chicago casting
Dogs provided by
Dogs provided by
Security
Projectionist
Travel services provided by
Completion guarantor
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Dog stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Film processing and col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Here Comes The Night," written and performed by Tom Thady
"Street People," written by Shawna Lee, Pete Byun, performed by Shawna Lee
"Chain Me Down," written by James Young, performed by James Young, Jan Hammer, courtesy of Absolute Records
+
SONGS
"Here Comes The Night," written and performed by Tom Thady
"Street People," written by Shawna Lee, Pete Byun, performed by Shawna Lee
"Chain Me Down," written by James Young, performed by James Young, Jan Hammer, courtesy of Absolute Records
"Blood Money," written by D. Van Beek, V. Sydlowski, performed by Price of Priesthood
"Fatal Strike," written by B. Cassady, S. Crandell, J. McKenna, performed by Squadron, courtesy of Heart & Soul Productions Ltd.
"Rebel Rock Noble Roll," written by T. Yore, performed by The Lifeboys
"Contradictory," written by R. McNaughton, performed by Popmedia
"Lonely One," written by P. Petraitis, performed by Marco Mundo
"Steakhouse," written by R. Warmowski, C. Uchida, J. Cohn, performed by The Defoliants
"Scream," written by S. Hager, performed by The Soul Assassins
"On The Line," written and performed by Tom Thady
"Working With Each Other," written by S. Tyrell, A. Hall, Guitars from Hell: Mic Fabus, James Young, Paul Petraitis, music published by Alloy Music A.S.C.A.P., Critical Mass B.M.I.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 September 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 27 September 1991
New York opening: 18 October 1991
Production Date:
began 23 May 1988
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Duration(in mins):
99
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29842
SYNOPSIS

Somewhere in the universe, the “Borrower,” a brutal killer, is given human form and banished to Earth. He is advised to take care of his new body, as any damage may result in a “painful metamorphosis.” The creature lands in a wildlife preserve near Chicago, Illinois, and attempts to kill the insect-like pilot of his spacecraft. Deer poachers Bob Laney and his son, Kip, come to the assistance of what they believe to be a fellow human, and frighten away the pilot. When the killer turns on the father and son, his head explodes. Bob believes he can sell the headless body as a medical curiosity, and sends Kip to borrow a neighbor’s van. Moments later, the body comes to life and replaces its head with Bob’s. In Chicago, police detectives Diana Pierce and Charles Krieger capture a violent rapist named Scully, who sustains a gunshot wound while resisting arrest. Meanwhile, a young woman named Astrid drives the Borrower into the city, oblivious to his throbbing cranium and strange mannerisms. At the police station, Kip Laney recounts the events at the wildlife preserve, but Charles Krieger dismisses the story, believing the young man is a drug addict. The Borrower is befriended by Julius Caesar Roosevelt, a homeless man who invites him to breakfast at a soup kitchen. A vagrant named Ruben Whitefeather interrupts their meal to beg for money, and responds to their refusal by placing a dead rat in the Borrower’s food. The alien is unfazed as he eats the rat, until Julius orders him to spit it out. That evening, Julius and Ruben introduce ... +


Somewhere in the universe, the “Borrower,” a brutal killer, is given human form and banished to Earth. He is advised to take care of his new body, as any damage may result in a “painful metamorphosis.” The creature lands in a wildlife preserve near Chicago, Illinois, and attempts to kill the insect-like pilot of his spacecraft. Deer poachers Bob Laney and his son, Kip, come to the assistance of what they believe to be a fellow human, and frighten away the pilot. When the killer turns on the father and son, his head explodes. Bob believes he can sell the headless body as a medical curiosity, and sends Kip to borrow a neighbor’s van. Moments later, the body comes to life and replaces its head with Bob’s. In Chicago, police detectives Diana Pierce and Charles Krieger capture a violent rapist named Scully, who sustains a gunshot wound while resisting arrest. Meanwhile, a young woman named Astrid drives the Borrower into the city, oblivious to his throbbing cranium and strange mannerisms. At the police station, Kip Laney recounts the events at the wildlife preserve, but Charles Krieger dismisses the story, believing the young man is a drug addict. The Borrower is befriended by Julius Caesar Roosevelt, a homeless man who invites him to breakfast at a soup kitchen. A vagrant named Ruben Whitefeather interrupts their meal to beg for money, and responds to their refusal by placing a dead rat in the Borrower’s food. The alien is unfazed as he eats the rat, until Julius orders him to spit it out. That evening, Julius and Ruben introduce the Borrower to liquor, which causes his head to explode. He replaces Bob’s head with that of Julius and feeds on the body. Ruben runs to the police station and describes the incident, but Charles dismisses the story as the ravings of an alcoholic. Meanwhile Scully escapes from custody after beating and raping policewoman Michelle Chodiss. At the city morgue, a coroner named Connie informs Charles and Diana that she has discovered a nonhuman blood type among the remains of the Borrower’s victims. Charles disregards her suggestion of an alien killer, arguing that the murders were the result of human depravity. The Borrower awakens in a hospital after drinking himself into a stupor, and assumes both the identity and the head of resident physician Dr. Cheever. Accessing the doctor’s memory, the Borrower drives to Cheever’s home and removes the head of his dog, Vlad. In an adjacent house, Astrid videotapes a rock band, whose members complain about the barking dog. The Borrower attacks Lance, the singer, but Astrid subdues the creature with a shotgun and summons police. After investigating the scene, Charles and Diana are ordered by their superior, Captain Scarcelli, to send the carcass of the “dog-headed monster” to the morgue. Later that night, Scully breaks into Diana’s bedroom, but she surprises the rapist and shoots him to death. In the morning, Diana and Charles are notified by Connie that the Borrower is still alive. They rush to the morgue to find Connie possessed by the alien and feeding on Scully’s corpse. Charles shoots the creature several times through the head, but within moments, the Borrower takes control of Scully’s body and attacks the detective. Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) come to Charles’s rescue and fire on the Borrower. Ignoring Diana’s warnings that the creature may not be dead, the agents take custody of the Borrower, and are killed while transporting him in an ambulance. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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