Deceived (1991)

PG-13 | 104 mins | Drama, Mystery | 27 September 1991

Director:

Damian Harris

Cinematographer:

Jack N. Green

Editor:

Neil Travis

Production Designer:

Andrew McAlpine

Production Companies:

Touchstone Pictures, Aysgarth Productions
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HISTORY

The working title of the film was The Mrs., as noted by several contemporary sources.
       On 2 Feb 1989, HR indicated that screenwriter Mary Agnes Donoghue was in the process of drafting The Mrs. for Geffen Companypany. Eight months later, a 30 Oct 1989 DV news brief announced that actress Goldie Hawn would star in the film for Hollywood Pictures. A 16 Dec 1989 Screen International news item anticipated that production would begin in the spring of 1990 under the direction of Alan Pakula . Although the news item credited Richard LaGravenese with writing the thriller, his name was not referenced by other contemporary sources. On 3 Jan 1990, DV announced that director Mark Rydell would helm the movie for Touchstone Pictures. Mary Agnes Donoghue was again listed as screenwriter. Production stalled from spring to summer to fall, with an 8 Aug 1990 Var brief suggesting that Goldie Hawn’s personal commitments were the cause of the delay.
       Principal photography on The Mrs. began 22 Jan 1991 in Toronto, Canada, by which time Damian Harris had replaced Mark Rydell as director. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that although a majority of filming took place on sets, numerous downtown Toronto locations served to situate the film in “New York City.” Scenes were filmed at the Hotel Inter-Continental; Royal Ontario Museum; Ontario Gallery of Art; Toronto City Hall; Toronto East General Hospital; St. John’s Norway Cemetery; Le Rendez-Vous and Centro restaurants; and various residential neighborhoods within the capital city. Production ended 16 Apr 1991.
       A 23 Sep 1991 Var news item that ... More Less

The working title of the film was The Mrs., as noted by several contemporary sources.
       On 2 Feb 1989, HR indicated that screenwriter Mary Agnes Donoghue was in the process of drafting The Mrs. for Geffen Companypany. Eight months later, a 30 Oct 1989 DV news brief announced that actress Goldie Hawn would star in the film for Hollywood Pictures. A 16 Dec 1989 Screen International news item anticipated that production would begin in the spring of 1990 under the direction of Alan Pakula . Although the news item credited Richard LaGravenese with writing the thriller, his name was not referenced by other contemporary sources. On 3 Jan 1990, DV announced that director Mark Rydell would helm the movie for Touchstone Pictures. Mary Agnes Donoghue was again listed as screenwriter. Production stalled from spring to summer to fall, with an 8 Aug 1990 Var brief suggesting that Goldie Hawn’s personal commitments were the cause of the delay.
       Principal photography on The Mrs. began 22 Jan 1991 in Toronto, Canada, by which time Damian Harris had replaced Mark Rydell as director. Production notes in AMPAS library files indicate that although a majority of filming took place on sets, numerous downtown Toronto locations served to situate the film in “New York City.” Scenes were filmed at the Hotel Inter-Continental; Royal Ontario Museum; Ontario Gallery of Art; Toronto City Hall; Toronto East General Hospital; St. John’s Norway Cemetery; Le Rendez-Vous and Centro restaurants; and various residential neighborhoods within the capital city. Production ended 16 Apr 1991.
       A 23 Sep 1991 Var news item that referred to the film by its release title, Deceived, suggested that screenwriter Bruce Joel Rubin had rewritten Mary James Donoghue’s screenplay. Although opening credits list Donoghue and “Derek Saunders” as writers, Var suspected that “Saunders” was a pseudonym. In an 11-17 Oct 1991 Village View article, Donoghue confirmed that when director Damian Harris requested changes that made her “uncomfortable,” she declined to rewrite the script, and Bruce Joel Rubin was hired to perform the task. Claiming not to have contributed to, or even read, Rubin’s changes, Donoghue expressed some frustration with requests for rewrites: “There can’t be two directors on a movie … why should writing be any different? The minute a movie is in production it seems like every director immediately wants to get it rewritten in order to put his mark on it. And there’s always a writer who will come in and rewrite a perfectly good screenplay.”
       Critics were fairly dismissive of the “Hitchcockian” thriller, faulting the predictable storyline for relying too heavily on broad leaps of logic.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “The producers wish to thank: Gallery One, Toronto; Jules Olitski; Andre Fauteux; Toronto Film Liaison Office; Ontario Film Development Corporation; The City of Toronto.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
30 Oct 1989.
---
Daily Variety
3 Jan 1990.
---
Daily Variety
1 Feb 1991.
---
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1991
p. 3, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Feb 1989
p. 3, 8.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Sep 1991
p. 10, 16.
Los Angeles Times
27 Sep 1991
Calendar, p. 11.
New York Times
27 Sep 1991
Section C, p. 8.
Reader
27 Sep 1991.
---
Screen International
16 Dec 1989.
---
Screen International
13 Jan 1990.
---
Variety
8 Aug 1990.
---
Variety
1 Oct 1990.
---
Variety
23 Sep 1991.
---
Variety
30 Sep 1991
p. 69.
Village View
11-17 Oct 1991
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Touchstone Pictures presents
in association with Silver Screen Partners IV
a Michael Finnell production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
3d asst dir
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
2d asst dir, New York crew
2d 2d asst dir, New York crew
DGA trainee, New York crew
2d asst dir, New York crew
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam trainee
Cam trainee
Focus puller
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Cam op, New York crew
1st asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Best boy elec, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Best boy grip, New York crew
Dolly grip, New York crew
Grip, New York crew
Still photog, New York crew
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Focus puller, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Prints by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Art consultant
Fine art specialist
Storyboard illustrator
Art dir, New York crew
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Asst ed (Toronto)
Asst ed (Toronto)
Negative cutter
Electronically edited on the
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dressing buyer
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Head carpenter
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Standby painter
Leadman, New York crew
Prop master, New York crew
Asst prop master, New York crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Ward supv
Ward tailor
Goldie Hawn's costumer
Women's ward, New York crew
Men's ward, New York crew
Goldie Hawn's costumer, New York crew
MUSIC
Addl mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Mus contractor
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Supv Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
ADR voices
Rerecording mixer
Rerecording mixer
Rerecording mixer
Sd mixer, New York crew
Boom op, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff asst
Titles & opticals
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist for Goldie Hawn
Key hairdresser
Goldie Hawn's hairstylist
Makeup artist, New York crew
Hairstylist, New York crew
Makeup, 2d unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to Mr. Finnell
Asst to Ms. Collett & Ms. Dozoretz
Asst to Ms. Schwartz
Asst to Ms. Sylbert
Asst to Mr. Harris
Asst to Ms. Hawn
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Office prod asst
On set tutor
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Casting asst
Casting (Toronto)
Extras casting
Craft service
Prod coord, New York crew
Loc mgr, New York crew
On set tutor, New York crew
Asst accountant, New York crew
Unit pub, New York crew
Transportation capt, New York crew
Transportation co-capt, New York crew
Extras casting, New York crew
Scr supv, 2d unit
Loc mgr, 2d unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
SOURCES
SONGS
"And Then I Wondered If You Knew," written by Denny Zeitlin, performed by The Denny Zeitlin Trio, courtesy of Windham Hill Jazz
"Euzkadi," written and performed by Steve Erquiaga, courtesy of Windham Hill Jazz
"Give In To Love," written and performed by Mark Bell, courtesy of Hollywood Records
+
SONGS
"And Then I Wondered If You Knew," written by Denny Zeitlin, performed by The Denny Zeitlin Trio, courtesy of Windham Hill Jazz
"Euzkadi," written and performed by Steve Erquiaga, courtesy of Windham Hill Jazz
"Give In To Love," written and performed by Mark Bell, courtesy of Hollywood Records
"Earth Angel," written by Dootsie Williams, performed by The Penguins, courtesy of Dootone Records
"Blues For The Mrs.," written and performed by Will Kaplan
"World Gone Strange," written and performed by Andy Summers, courtesy of Private Music
"Kuini Ripeka," written by Tama Huata, performed by the Maori Dancers.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Mrs.
Release Date:
27 September 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 27 September 1991
Production Date:
22 January--16 April 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Buena Vista Pictures Distribution, Inc.
Copyright Date:
25 September 1991
Copyright Number:
PA540680
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Prints
Produced and distributed on Eastman Film
Duration(in mins):
104
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31391
SYNOPSIS

On a rainy night in New York City, Adrienne Davis waits for a “blind date” at an elegant restaurant. She makes eye contact with a handsome diner across the room and suspects he is the unknown suitor, but the waiter informs her otherwise. After some time, she leaves the restaurant alone. The next morning, the handsome diner stops by Adrienne’s art restoration studio and introduces himself as Jack Saunders, an art acquisitor. Instantly captivated with each other, Jack and Adrienne spend the entire night talking and laughing. In the morning, they kiss. Six years later, the couple celebrate their daughter Mary’s fifth birthday. After the party, Jack and his daughter look through a photo album containing pictures of Jack’s childhood in Nebraska. A few days later, Jack and Adrienne attend a gala event at the Founders Museum, an art museum specializing in antiquities. There, they greet their friend, Harvey Schwartz, who is a restorer at the museum. Later, Adrienne asks if she can make a phone call in Harvey’s office. While wandering through the back rooms, she discovers the body of her friend and fellow art restorer, Tomasz, hanging from a ceiling fixture. When police arrive, Harvey and his colleagues suggest that their supervisor may have been depressed. Although Tomasz’s death is ruled a suicide, Adrienne is not convinced that her mentor killed himself. The next day at the museum, Harvey watches his co-worker, Jane, inspect an Egyptian necklace. That night, Jack informs Adrienne that the necklace, which he acquired for the museum, is a fake. Adrienne wonders if Tomasz swapped the real necklace for the fake one, before killing himself out of guilt. Just then, Jack announces that ... +


On a rainy night in New York City, Adrienne Davis waits for a “blind date” at an elegant restaurant. She makes eye contact with a handsome diner across the room and suspects he is the unknown suitor, but the waiter informs her otherwise. After some time, she leaves the restaurant alone. The next morning, the handsome diner stops by Adrienne’s art restoration studio and introduces himself as Jack Saunders, an art acquisitor. Instantly captivated with each other, Jack and Adrienne spend the entire night talking and laughing. In the morning, they kiss. Six years later, the couple celebrate their daughter Mary’s fifth birthday. After the party, Jack and his daughter look through a photo album containing pictures of Jack’s childhood in Nebraska. A few days later, Jack and Adrienne attend a gala event at the Founders Museum, an art museum specializing in antiquities. There, they greet their friend, Harvey Schwartz, who is a restorer at the museum. Later, Adrienne asks if she can make a phone call in Harvey’s office. While wandering through the back rooms, she discovers the body of her friend and fellow art restorer, Tomasz, hanging from a ceiling fixture. When police arrive, Harvey and his colleagues suggest that their supervisor may have been depressed. Although Tomasz’s death is ruled a suicide, Adrienne is not convinced that her mentor killed himself. The next day at the museum, Harvey watches his co-worker, Jane, inspect an Egyptian necklace. That night, Jack informs Adrienne that the necklace, which he acquired for the museum, is a fake. Adrienne wonders if Tomasz swapped the real necklace for the fake one, before killing himself out of guilt. Just then, Jack announces that he must go to Boston, Massachusetts, to attend an art auction. In his absence, Adrienne meets her co-worker, Charlotte, at a Manhattan hotel to inspect a ceiling mural. Charlotte claims to have seen Jack in the lobby, but Adrienne dismisses the suggestion. When Jack returns home, he presents his wife with a gift of lingerie. Later, the couple celebrate their sixth wedding anniversary in the company of friends. Alone with Harvey, Adrienne asks why he looks so glum. Harvey explains that the museum traced the forgery of the necklace to a man named Daniel Sherman. Suspecting Thomas knew the criminal, he sorted through the dead man’s bank statements, but found nothing out of the ordinary. Harvey worries that the unresolved mystery makes everyone at the museum a suspect. Later that night, Adrienne awakens to find her husband in the midst of a heated telephone conversation. However, Jack tells her not to be concerned. A few days later, Adrienne receives a phone call from the lingerie store informing her that Jack left his credit card there. She frets about retrieving the card from Boston, but the clerk clarifies that the store is located in Manhattan. When Jack returns home, Adrienne accuses him of lying. They argue, until Jack leaves the house. He drives through lower Manhattan and picks up a passenger. Later, the car speeds down a winding snow-covered road, before careening over an embankment and bursting into flames. At the hospital, Adrienne tearfully identifies Jack’s wedding ring and watch. A few weeks after the funeral, the Saunders’ housemaid, Lillian, finds an exotic necklace on the floor of the closet and places it among Adrienne’s jewelry. Meanwhile, a clerk at the Social Security office tells Adrienne that the “Jack Saunders” associated with her husband’s social security number died sixteen years ago. Perplexed, the widow stops at the library and looks up the deceased Nebraska man named “Jack Saunders.” When she returns home, she peruses her husband’s family photo album while Mary and a friend play with her jewelry. Engrossed in the photos, she does not notice when Mary’s playmate puts on the Egyptian necklace. The next day, Adrienne visits the records office, where a high school yearbook photograph confirms that “Jack Saunders” was not the man she married. However, Jack’s classmate “Frank Sullivan” looks strikingly similar to her husband. The next day, Adrienne visits the real Jack Saunders’ cousin, Evelyn. The woman reminisces about Frank Sullivan, Jack’s charismatic best friend, and how he won her affection by staying up all night talking to her. Adrienne is stunned. Evelyn recalls Frank’s mother’s address, and a few days later, Adrienne pays the elderly woman a visit. Frank’s mother is openly derisive of her son, calling him selfish. That night, Adrienne comforts her daughter, who believes there is a man in the house. The next day, their apartment is ransacked, and Adrienne finds Lillian, the housemaid, barely alive in the bathroom. Adrienne returns to Mrs. Sullivan’s house, where, to her surprise, her husband awaits. He claims he meant no harm in taking his dead friend’s identity, but when an art forger named Daniel Sherman deduced what he had done, the man blackmailed him into stealing pieces from the museum and replacing them with fakes. Jack asks Adrienne to locate the original Egyptian necklace, and she returns home to search for it. While rifling through Jack’s briefcase, she finds an identification card showing his picture but bearing the name, “Daniel Sherman.” She takes a cab to the address listed, and meets Daniel’s wife, who is also an art collector. Adrienne sees a wedding portrait of her husband and the woman, and becomes further upset on noticing a picture of her own daughter, Mary. Just then, Jack calls and asks to speak to Adrienne. He informs her that he has taken custody of Mary, who has revealed that her playmate took the Egyptian necklace home. Jack tells Adrienne to obtain the necklace and meet him at their apartment later that night. There, he attempts to manipulate her into thinking he still loves her. When they kiss, Adrienne stabs him with a kitchen knife, before running from the apartment. A chase ensues through the unoccupied floors of the building, until Jack falls down an elevator shaft and dies. Sometime later, Adrienne and Mary move out of their apartment. The girl asks to keep her father’s photo album, and Adrienne suggests she pack it in her suitcase. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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