Eve of Destruction (1991)

R | 100 mins | Science fiction | 18 January 1991

Full page view
HISTORY

Principal photography began 11 Dec 1990, as stated in the 30 Jan 1990 HR. The 30 Sep 1989 Screen International noted that Renée Soutendyk, who played the title character, was the first Dutch actress to star in “a major Hollywood production.” The budget was estimated at $15 million.
       According to the 27 Apr 1990 HR, the nine-week production was filmed primarily on a soundstage, which included a replica interior of the “53rd Street and Lexington” subway station in New York City. The San Francisco, CA, location unit was comprised of twenty cast and crewmembers from Los Angeles, CA, and thirty local residents, including background actors and “bit” players. Filming continued through two days of heavy rains. The completion of photography was announced in the 17 Mar 1990 Screen International. The 31 Jan 1990 Var noted that actor Kevin McCarthy was featured in an uncredited role. As stated in the 22 Jan 1991 HR, the promotional “standee” for the film was modeled on Renée Soutendyk’s character, “Eve VIII.”
       Eve of Destruction opened 18 Jan 1991 to mixed reviews. While the 21 Jan 1991 LAT praised it as possibly “the wittiest, most original and provocative science fiction thriller” of the year, the 21 Jan 1991 Var dismissed the film as a “tasteless horror fantasy.” According to the Apr 1991 Box, the film earned approximately $5 million during its brief run.
       End credits include the following statement: “Filmed on location in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, and at Valencia Studios, ... More Less

Principal photography began 11 Dec 1990, as stated in the 30 Jan 1990 HR. The 30 Sep 1989 Screen International noted that Renée Soutendyk, who played the title character, was the first Dutch actress to star in “a major Hollywood production.” The budget was estimated at $15 million.
       According to the 27 Apr 1990 HR, the nine-week production was filmed primarily on a soundstage, which included a replica interior of the “53rd Street and Lexington” subway station in New York City. The San Francisco, CA, location unit was comprised of twenty cast and crewmembers from Los Angeles, CA, and thirty local residents, including background actors and “bit” players. Filming continued through two days of heavy rains. The completion of photography was announced in the 17 Mar 1990 Screen International. The 31 Jan 1990 Var noted that actor Kevin McCarthy was featured in an uncredited role. As stated in the 22 Jan 1991 HR, the promotional “standee” for the film was modeled on Renée Soutendyk’s character, “Eve VIII.”
       Eve of Destruction opened 18 Jan 1991 to mixed reviews. While the 21 Jan 1991 LAT praised it as possibly “the wittiest, most original and provocative science fiction thriller” of the year, the 21 Jan 1991 Var dismissed the film as a “tasteless horror fantasy.” According to the Apr 1991 Box, the film earned approximately $5 million during its brief run.
       End credits include the following statement: “Filmed on location in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, and at Valencia Studios, California.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
Apr 1991.
---
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1989
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jan 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jan 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jan 1991
p. 6, 54.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jan 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
21 Jan 1991
p. 11.
New York Times
19 Jan 1991
p. 22.
Screen International
30 Sep 1989.
---
Screen International
17 Mar 1990.
---
Variety
31 Jan 1990.
---
Variety
21 Jan 1991
p. 77.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Nelson Entertainment presents
An Interscope Communications Production
An Orion® Pictures Release
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
DGA trainee
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Co-exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Addl cam op
Addl 1st asst cam
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst
Steadicam asst
Still photog
Elec best boy
Addl elec
Addl elec
Addl elec
Key grip
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Addl grip
Addl grip
Addl grip
Cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st cam asst, 2d unit
Asst cam, 2d unit
Asst cam, 2d unit
Asst cam, 2d unit
Asst cam, 2d unit
Elec best boy, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Motion control cam
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead person
Set dresser
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst props
Asst props
Set des
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Painter
Painter
Scenic painter
Scenic painter
Plasterer
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's costumer
Women's costumer
MUSIC
Orig mus comp and arr by
Mus ed
Rec & mixed at
Mus contractor
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd des and supv sd ed
Sd des and supv sd ed
Sd ed services
Walla group
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd services by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Spec eff
Title des
Titles and opticals by
Graphic eff by
Graphic eff by
Vis eff supv
Motion builder supv
MAKEUP
Key make-up
Key hair stylist
Asst hair/make-up
Addl make-up
Prosthetics and spec eff make-up
Prosthetics and spec eff make-up
Prosthetics elf
Prosthetics elf
Prosthetics elf
Prosthetics elf
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Asst prod coord
Scr supv
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Loc mgr
Asst to Mr. Madden
Asst to Mr. Gibbins
Dialect coach
Unit pub
Nelson prod supv
Nelson prod coord
Nelson prod coord
Addl casting
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting coord
Extras casting coord
Extras casting (New York)
Animal trainer
Caterer
Craft service
Tech adv
First aid
Studio teacher
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Picture car coord
Honeywagon driver
Honeywagon driver
Prod van driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Water truck driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Scr supv, 2d unit
Insurance provided by
Completion guarantee by
Payroll service
Financial consultant
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
“Acapulco,” written by David Snell, published by Bruton Music/APM Music (ASCAP)
“Got To Have It,” written and performed by Pat Schunk and Tom Kramer, published by Cue Gardens Music, Schunk Songs and Inappropriate Music (ASCAP)
“Second Wind,” written by Pat Schunk and Tom Kramer, performed by Lisa Kramer, published by Cue Gardens Music, Schunk Songs and Inappropriate Music (ASCAP)
+
SONGS
“Acapulco,” written by David Snell, published by Bruton Music/APM Music (ASCAP)
“Got To Have It,” written and performed by Pat Schunk and Tom Kramer, published by Cue Gardens Music, Schunk Songs and Inappropriate Music (ASCAP)
“Second Wind,” written by Pat Schunk and Tom Kramer, performed by Lisa Kramer, published by Cue Gardens Music, Schunk Songs and Inappropriate Music (ASCAP)
“Round And Round,” written by Pat Schunk and Tom Kramer, performed by Mindy, published by Cue Gardens Music, Schunk Songs and Inappropriate Music (ASCAP).
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
18 January 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 18 January 1991
Production Date:
11 December 1990--mid March 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Nelson Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 March 1991
Copyright Number:
PA511744
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Cam and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30390
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

U.S. government scientist Dr. Eve Simmons designs an android named “Eve VIII,” endowed with its creator’s physical attributes, memories, and emotions. A government agent accompanies Eve VIII on a trial run in San Francisco, California, where they encounter a bank robbery in progress. The agent is killed in the ensuing gunfight, and after sustaining an abdominal wound, Eve VIII throws the gunman through a window, takes his weapon, and disappears. Bill Schneider of the National Security Council (NSC) apprises U.S. Marine Colonel Jim McQuade, an expert in counter-terrorism, of Eve VIII’s condition, explaining that the android is designed for combat and the wound may have locked in her “battlefield mode.” If so, Eve VIII is a threat to society. Meanwhile, Dr. Simmons says goodbye to her young son, Timmy, who is returning to New York City, where he lives with his father, Peter Arnold. Later, Dr. Simmons advises Jim McQuade that he can disable Eve VIII only by shooting her through the eyes, but neglects to mention that the android is equipped with a small nuclear weapon. Using a credit card issued to “Eve Vickers,” the robot rents a car. She buys clothing, ammunition, and a detailed map of Northern California. At the Pink Lady tavern, Eve VIII meets a womanizer named Cal, and joins him at a nearby motel. As Cal’s two friends listen outside the door, Eve VIII bites off Cal’s penis when he insults her with the word “bitch,” a term her abusive father used frequently. The men race to Cal’s defense, but the android leaves them badly maimed. Police discover the rental car outside, and after alerting Jim McQuade and Dr. Simmons, they engage in ... +


U.S. government scientist Dr. Eve Simmons designs an android named “Eve VIII,” endowed with its creator’s physical attributes, memories, and emotions. A government agent accompanies Eve VIII on a trial run in San Francisco, California, where they encounter a bank robbery in progress. The agent is killed in the ensuing gunfight, and after sustaining an abdominal wound, Eve VIII throws the gunman through a window, takes his weapon, and disappears. Bill Schneider of the National Security Council (NSC) apprises U.S. Marine Colonel Jim McQuade, an expert in counter-terrorism, of Eve VIII’s condition, explaining that the android is designed for combat and the wound may have locked in her “battlefield mode.” If so, Eve VIII is a threat to society. Meanwhile, Dr. Simmons says goodbye to her young son, Timmy, who is returning to New York City, where he lives with his father, Peter Arnold. Later, Dr. Simmons advises Jim McQuade that he can disable Eve VIII only by shooting her through the eyes, but neglects to mention that the android is equipped with a small nuclear weapon. Using a credit card issued to “Eve Vickers,” the robot rents a car. She buys clothing, ammunition, and a detailed map of Northern California. At the Pink Lady tavern, Eve VIII meets a womanizer named Cal, and joins him at a nearby motel. As Cal’s two friends listen outside the door, Eve VIII bites off Cal’s penis when he insults her with the word “bitch,” a term her abusive father used frequently. The men race to Cal’s defense, but the android leaves them badly maimed. Police discover the rental car outside, and after alerting Jim McQuade and Dr. Simmons, they engage in a gunfight with Eve VIII that leaves several officers dead. Surveying the carnage, Dr. Simmons recalls the tavern from her youth, and confesses to an adolescent fantasy Eve VIII apparently attempted to fulfill. Hoping to predict the android’s next move, Jim demands detailed personal information from Dr. Simmons. Meanwhile, Eve VIII continues her journey, haunted by the memory of her creator’s father, William Simmons, who accidentally killed his wife in a drunken rage. The next morning, Eve VIII is angered by an impatient driver who repeatedly calls her “bitch.” As she rams into the car and kills the driver, the impact sets her built-in nuclear device to detonate in twenty-four hours. Posing as a hitchhiker, Eve VIII steals a car and makes her way north. Guessing where Eve VIII is heading, Dr. Simmons leads Jim and a squad of Marines to her father’s house. Jim enters to find William Simmons unconscious and Eve VIII in a state of agitation. Dr. Simmons attempts to calm the android, but when her father awakens, Eve VIII kills the old man, along with three Marines, and escapes. Realizing that her creation was expressing the latent hatred she harbored toward her father, Dr. Simmons guesses that Eve VIII may now be acting on the guilt she feels about relinquishing her son to his father. She alerts Jim that Eve VIII may be heading to New York City to abduct her son, Timmy Arnold. Government agents maintain surveillance on her ex-husband’s apartment, but are powerless against Eve VIII when she enters the building. Dr. Simmons telephones Peter Arnold from the command post across the street, and instructs him to get Timmy to the lobby as quickly as possible. However, Eve VIII knocks Peter unconscious and abducts the child. Listening to Timmy’s cries of terror, Jim and Dr. Simmons follow the android through crowded streets and into a subway tunnel. As Eve VIII carries Timmy along the tracks, Jim receives a message about an oncoming train that the transit system is unable to stop. With only minutes before detonation, Eve VIII uses the last of her ammunition to inflict a minor gunshot wound on Jim. From the train platform, Dr. Simmons asks the android to throw Timmy into her arms, and Eve VIII complies, recalling a happy moment from the boy’s infancy. With the fast train approaching, Jim fires his last bullet through the robot’s right eye, but Eve VIII survives both the gunshot and the impact of the train. Jim throws his gun to Dr. Simmons and distracts the android by calling her “bitch.” As Timmy runs from the station, Dr. Simmons shoves the gun barrel through Eve VIII’s left eye, disabling the robot just seconds prior to detonation. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.