House Party 2 (1991)

R | 94 mins | Comedy | 23 October 1991

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HISTORY

The 20 Apr 1990 HR announced plans by New Line Cinema to make a sequel to its hit release, House Party (1990, see entry), which earned over $16 million in three weeks. Preproduction was underway by late 1991, as reported in the 2 Dec 1991 LAT. The “under $5-million” picture was to be the feature film debut of music-video director Paris Barclay. Brothers Warrington and Reginald Hudlin, who produced and directed House Party, were expected to serve as executive producers. However, Reginald Hudlin told the 6 Jan 1991 LAT that he and his brother would have no creative involvement in the production, as they never received a serious offer from New Line. Regardless, the brothers maintained a financial interest in the franchise.
       A casting call notice appeared in the 31 Jan 1991 Hollywood Drama-Logue, seeking actors to play “Jamal,” a white college student with African-American mannerisms, and “Zora,” an “Afro-centric” feminist. According to the 2 Apr and 15 May 1991 HR, principal photography began 1 Apr 1991 and was completed 14 May 1991. Although Paris Barclay was credited in the earlier news item, producers Doug McHenry and George Jackson assumed directorial duties while filming was in progress.
       The 22 Jul 1991 HR announced that New Line was considering a promotional partnership with the Burger King restaurant chain, pending a vote from franchisees. A decision was expected by late Aug 1991. New Line was also in negotiations with the United Negro College Fund and American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T), for a promotional campaign targeting college campuses, ... More Less

The 20 Apr 1990 HR announced plans by New Line Cinema to make a sequel to its hit release, House Party (1990, see entry), which earned over $16 million in three weeks. Preproduction was underway by late 1991, as reported in the 2 Dec 1991 LAT. The “under $5-million” picture was to be the feature film debut of music-video director Paris Barclay. Brothers Warrington and Reginald Hudlin, who produced and directed House Party, were expected to serve as executive producers. However, Reginald Hudlin told the 6 Jan 1991 LAT that he and his brother would have no creative involvement in the production, as they never received a serious offer from New Line. Regardless, the brothers maintained a financial interest in the franchise.
       A casting call notice appeared in the 31 Jan 1991 Hollywood Drama-Logue, seeking actors to play “Jamal,” a white college student with African-American mannerisms, and “Zora,” an “Afro-centric” feminist. According to the 2 Apr and 15 May 1991 HR, principal photography began 1 Apr 1991 and was completed 14 May 1991. Although Paris Barclay was credited in the earlier news item, producers Doug McHenry and George Jackson assumed directorial duties while filming was in progress.
       The 22 Jul 1991 HR announced that New Line was considering a promotional partnership with the Burger King restaurant chain, pending a vote from franchisees. A decision was expected by late Aug 1991. New Line was also in negotiations with the United Negro College Fund and American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T), for a promotional campaign targeting college campuses, which would coincide with the film’s autumn release.
       Mitch Goldman, president and chief operating officer of New Line Distribution, Inc., told the 26 Jul 1991 HR that a “wider” release was planned for House Party 2, based on the success of its predecessor. The company sought to open in larger venues to avoid turning away customers, and offered to fund additional security guards to help theaters maintain crowd control. New Line was also considering a Wednesday debut to reduce the possibility of large, unruly opening-day crowds.
       House Party 2 premiered 21 Oct 1991 at the Cineplex Odeon in the Century City district of Los Angeles, CA, as reported in the 9 Oct 1991 DV. . Proceeds from the event, described as a “Pajama Jammie Jam,” benefited the Los Aneles Urban League and the Gary Hendler Minority Filmmaker’s Program at the American Film Institute. A reception was held at the Twenty/20 nightclub after the screening. The 25 Oct 1991 DV stated that the picture opened 23 Oct 1991 in 1,121 theaters, earning $742,565 in one day. House Party 2 marked the directorial debut of Doug McHenry and George Jackson. Despite lukewarm critical reviews, the 30 Oct 1991 HR credited the film’s $6 million opening week with increasing overall box-office receipts by three percent, following a thirteen-week decline.
       The review in the 23 Oct 1991 HR cited the title as House Party 2: The Pajama Jam!
       Credits include the following statement: "This film is dedicated to the loving memory of Robin Harris 'Pops'."
       End credits include the following statements: "Special Thanks to Reginald and Warrington Hudlin"; "Special thanks to Dr. Betty Shabazz; Mattie and Exetta Harris; Joe Boxer Corp.; Adidas; Ford Showcase; Mark Siegal; Michael Harpster; Darryll Brooks & Carol Kirkendall."
       The name of the band, Wreckx-n-Effect, was misspelled in end credits as "Wrecks 'n' Effect." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Oct 1991
p. 9.
Daily Variety
25 Oct 1991
p. 3.
Hollywood Drama-Logue
31 Jan 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 1990
p. 1, 68.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 1991
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 1991
p. 1, 22.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1991
p. 5, 15.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
2 Dec 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Jan 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Oct 1991
p. 12.
New York Times
23 Oct 1991
p. 17.
Variety
28 Oct 1991
p. 44.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
New Line Cinema Presents
A Jackson/McHenry Production
A Film by Doug & George
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir consultant/2d unit dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Film loader
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst
Technocrane op
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Still photog
Grip equip
Louma crane
Cam and lenses
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Visual consultant
Art dept coord
Art dept asst
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Post prod exec
Post-prod supv
Post-prod admin
Assoc ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
On-set dresser
Set dresser
Lead scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Special props/Set painter
Paper mache asst
Murals by
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Product placement
Product placement
Const coord
Const foreman
Const asst
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Set painter
Set painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Ward supv
Set costumer
Ward asst
Ward asst
Kid 'N Play's jackets by
MUSIC
Exec mus supv
Mus comp
Mus supv, Cinemusic Services
Mus supv, Cinemusic Services
Asst mus ed
Mus ed
SOUND
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Addl voice
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cable man
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
ADR rec
Addl voices by
Foley supv
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and opticals
Titles and opticals
Optical supv
DANCE
Choreog
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist
Kid 'N Play's barber
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting dir
Post prod exec
Prod exec
Scr supv
Product placement
Product placement
Unit pub
Post prod admin
Key prod assoc
Prod assoc
Asst to prods
Asst to prods
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Prod attorney
Prod attorney
Prod controller
Contract supv
Legal asst
Casting asst
Set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Loc mgr
Loc asst
Loc asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Dial coach
Extras casting
Extras casting coord
Extras casting coord
Chef's asst
Chef's asst
Chef's helper
Craft service
Set medic
Payroll services
Exec in charge of prod
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Reginald Hudlin.
SONGS
“O.P.P.,” written by Vincent Brown, Keir Gist, Anthony Criss and the Corporation, performed by Naughty By Nature, courtesy of Tommy Boy Music, Inc.
“Rated R,” written by Terry Lewis, Jimmy Jam and Ralph Tresvant, performed by Ralph Tresvant, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Ain't Gonna Hurt Nobody,” performed by Kid N' Play, produced by Eric "Quicksilver" Johnson, written by Christopher Reid, Reggie Hargis, Eric Johnson, copyright 1991 Select Records, Hittage Music, Caliber/Good High Music, Kid 'n Play Music, Kid 'n Play record exclusively for Select Records
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SONGS
“O.P.P.,” written by Vincent Brown, Keir Gist, Anthony Criss and the Corporation, performed by Naughty By Nature, courtesy of Tommy Boy Music, Inc.
“Rated R,” written by Terry Lewis, Jimmy Jam and Ralph Tresvant, performed by Ralph Tresvant, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Ain't Gonna Hurt Nobody,” performed by Kid N' Play, produced by Eric "Quicksilver" Johnson, written by Christopher Reid, Reggie Hargis, Eric Johnson, copyright 1991 Select Records, Hittage Music, Caliber/Good High Music, Kid 'n Play Music, Kid 'n Play record exclusively for Select Records
“Frienz,” performed by Kid N' Play, produced by Eric "Quicksilver" Johnson, written by Christopher Reid, Christopher Martin, Eric Johnson, copyright 1991 Select Records, Hittage Music, A Lil' Play Music, Kid 'n Play Music, Kid 'n Play record exclusively for Select Records
“Candlelight & You,” written by Chante Moore, Phillip L. Stewart II and Tony Haynes, performed by Chante Moore and Keith Washington, Chante Moore appears courtesy of MCA Records, Inc., Keith Washington appears courtesy of Qwest/Warner Bros. Records Inc.
“Optimistic,” written by Terry Lewis and James Harris III, performed by Sounds of Blackness, courtesy of Perspective Records
“Attention: The Shawanda Story,” written by Lance Alexander, Tony Tolbert and Andre Shepard, performed by Lo Key?, courtesy of Perspective Records
“Skat Rap,” written by Kamron, performed by Kamron of the Young Black Teenagers, produced by Gary G-Whiz and Stuart Robertz, courtesy of the Imperial Grand Ministers of Funk
“Angie's Theme (You Pay What You Owe),” written by Vassal Benford, engineered by Victor Flores, Martin Rodriguez and Ray Moore, produced by Vassal Benford
“I Like Your Style,” written by Aqil Davidson, Teddy Riley and Lee "Bubba" Drakeford, performed by Bubba, Bubba appears courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
“I Lust 4 U,” written and performed by London Jones, London Jones appears courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Now U Want More,” written by Gordon Jones and DonEtienne Wiggins, produced by Gordon Jones and DonEtienne Wiggins for GorJams Productions, performed by Dieyelle Reed
“Ready Or Not (Here I Come),” written by Aqil Davidson, Teddy Riley and Markell Riley, performed by Wrecks 'n' Effect, Wrecks 'n' Effect appears courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Talkin' About Jesus,” written by Maxine Watta and Bill Wesley, produced by Bill Wesley, performed by Maxine Watta
“House Party II (I Don't Know What You Come To Do),” written by Raphael Wiggins and Dwayne Wiggins, performed by Tony! Toni! Toné!, Tony! Toni! Toné! appear courtesy of PolyGram Records, Inc.
“Gentlemen Prefer Ladies,” written by Maxine Watta, Bill Wesley and James Bradley, Jr., produced by Bill Wesley and James Bradley, Jr., performed by Bill Wesley
“It's So Hard To Say Goodbye To Yesterday,” written by Freddie Perren and Christian Yarian, performed by The Flex, The Flex appear courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Treat 'Em Right,” written by Richard Simpson, Howard Thompson, produced by Howie Tee and Chubb Rock, performed by Chubb Rock, courtesy of Select Records
“What's On Your Mind,” written by Eric Barrier and William Griffin, performed by Eric B. & Rakim, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Knowledge Is Power,” written and performed by Queen Latifah, Queen Latifah's performance courtesy of Tommy Boy Music, Ltd.
“Yo Baby Yo,” written by Timothy Christian and Raphael Wiggins, performed by Ralph Tresvant, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Motownphilly,” written by Dallas Austin, Michael Bivins, Nathan Morris and Shawn Stockman, performed by Boyz II Men, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.
“Let Me Know Something,” written by Roney Hooks, Eric Sadler, Keith Shocklee and Darrol Durant, performed by Bell Biv Devoe, courtesy of MCA Records, Inc.
“Brandenburg Concerto II,” F Major Movement 1, written by J. S. Bach, arranged by Louis Knatchbull, Associated Production Music
“Johannesburg,” written and performed by Gil Scott-Heron, courtesy of Arista Records.
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COMPOSERS
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DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
House Party II
House Party 2: The Pajama Jam!
Release Date:
23 October 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 23 October 1991
New York opening: 23 October 1991
Production Date:
1 April--14 May 1991
Copyright Claimant:
New Line Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 January 1992
Copyright Number:
PA577230
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Cameras and lenses by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Film House
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31385
SYNOPSIS

Christopher Robinson, Jr., known as “Kid,” plans to attend college after his church awards him a full scholarship. “Play,” a record store manager and Kid’s musical partner, tries to discourage his friend’s educational ambitions, believing they have a bright future as rap artists. In a final effort to change Kid’s mind, Play introduces him to Sheila Landreaux, a talent scout who offers to finance the team’s demonstration recording. However, Kid declines, determined to earn his degree and satisfy his late father’s dying wish. He arrives at college later that day and meets his new roommate, Jamal, a white student obsessed with African American “hip-hop” culture. Kid’s girl friend, Sidney, also begins her college career, and shares a dormitory with Zora, a feminist who criticizes her blind devotion to Kid. Elsewhere on campus, an elderly woman named Mrs. Deevers finds employment as security guards for her three dull-witted grandsons. Meanwhile, Play convinces Sheila Landreaux of his potential as a solo act, prompting an aspiring disc jockey named Bilal to offer his services as accompanist. While registering for classes, Kid realizes he left his endorsed tuition check in Play’s car. Although Play promises to deliver the check, he loans the money to Sheila Landreaux after she claims her partner, Rick, gambled away their production funds. At the college, Kid is summoned to Dean Kramer’s office and given one more week to pay his tuition or face expulsion. When Play learns of his friend’s predicament, he tries to contact Sheila and discovers she is a fraud, known by numerous identities for swindling aspiring artists. Kid reluctantly approaches Sidney to ask for a loan from her wealthy parents. ... +


Christopher Robinson, Jr., known as “Kid,” plans to attend college after his church awards him a full scholarship. “Play,” a record store manager and Kid’s musical partner, tries to discourage his friend’s educational ambitions, believing they have a bright future as rap artists. In a final effort to change Kid’s mind, Play introduces him to Sheila Landreaux, a talent scout who offers to finance the team’s demonstration recording. However, Kid declines, determined to earn his degree and satisfy his late father’s dying wish. He arrives at college later that day and meets his new roommate, Jamal, a white student obsessed with African American “hip-hop” culture. Kid’s girl friend, Sidney, also begins her college career, and shares a dormitory with Zora, a feminist who criticizes her blind devotion to Kid. Elsewhere on campus, an elderly woman named Mrs. Deevers finds employment as security guards for her three dull-witted grandsons. Meanwhile, Play convinces Sheila Landreaux of his potential as a solo act, prompting an aspiring disc jockey named Bilal to offer his services as accompanist. While registering for classes, Kid realizes he left his endorsed tuition check in Play’s car. Although Play promises to deliver the check, he loans the money to Sheila Landreaux after she claims her partner, Rick, gambled away their production funds. At the college, Kid is summoned to Dean Kramer’s office and given one more week to pay his tuition or face expulsion. When Play learns of his friend’s predicament, he tries to contact Sheila and discovers she is a fraud, known by numerous identities for swindling aspiring artists. Kid reluctantly approaches Sidney to ask for a loan from her wealthy parents. However, she assumes from Kid’s solemn tone that he wants to “see other people,” and ends their relationship. Dean Kramer’s young assistant, Miles, offers to arrange an extension on Kid’s deadline and takes the last of his money to secure the deal. Later, Kid exasperates Professor Sinclair, who teaches African American history, by consistently being late for class and failing to do his homework. The professor demands a twenty-page paper demonstrating Kid’s understanding of his reading assignments, or he will receive a failing grade. Hoping to earn tuition money, Kid finds employment in the faculty dining hall under the irascible Mr. Lee, while struggling to complete his class work. Meanwhile, Play concocts a plan to raise money for his friend by throwing a party, in which pajama-clad male students pay admission to the faculty dining hall to dance with young women in negligees. When Kid discovers that Miles has made no effort to extend his deadline, he agrees to the plan. At a political demonstration, Zora makes a speech that evolves into a rap routine, attracting the attention of Rick, who offers her a recording contract. Aware that Kid is facing expulsion, Miles uses the opportunity to make advances on Sidney. Although Sidney is flattered by the attention, Zora hints that Miles is not of good character. Word of the party spreads quickly through the campus, ensuring a large crowd. On the night of the party, Sidney dresses in emulation of Zora, who advises her to develop her own unique identity. When they arrive at the dining hall, Sidney witnesses an innocent embrace between Kid and another girl, which she mistakes for romance. Although Miles knows the truth, he pretends to agree with Sidney’s assumption, hoping to prevent the couple from reconciling. Rick also attends, accompanied by Sheila Landreaux, alias “Miriam Mobuto,” with plans to swindle Zora. The Deever boys learn about the unauthorized party and search the campus, intent on shutting it down. While performing a rap routine with Play, Kid notices Miles attempting to seduce Sidney and goes to her defense. As the Deever boys enter the party, Play exposes Sheila and Rick as swindlers. Zora punches Sheila unconscious and the Deevers pursue Rick. When Kid confronts Miles on the dining hall roof, his rival tumbles through the skylight into a large cake below. Dean Kramer enters and demands an explanation. After Play identifies Sheila, Rick, and Miles as swindlers, the dean commends the Deevers and fires Miles. He orders the partygoers to disperse and gives Kid one hour to restore the hall to its original state. Kid apologizes to his boss, Mr. Lee, and donates the proceeds from the party to cover repairs. By morning, Kid has reconciled with Sidney, but is despondent over having to leave school. Professor Sinclair is impressed with Kid’s paper and encourages him to continue his education when he is able. Play accepts responsibility for his friend’s plight and replaces the tuition money by selling his car. He now considers Kid an investment, and promises regular visits to monitor his friend’s progress. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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