The Marrying Man (1991)

R | 116 mins | Comedy, Romance | 5 April 1991

Director:

Jerry Rees

Writer:

Neil Simon

Producer:

David Permut

Cinematographer:

Donald E. Thorin

Production Designer:

William F. Matthews

Production Company:

Hollywood Pictures
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HISTORY

In his 23 Mar 1989 “Just for Variety” DV column, and again on 1 Aug 1989 and 8 Apr 1991, Army Archerd reported that comedian-producer Alan King was upset with writer Neil Simon, whom he met at the Grand Champions tennis tournament in 1988. He told Simon the story of Harry Karl, who married Marie “The Body” McDonald four different times, and Simon was reportedly enthusiastic about working with King on the project, producing s fifteen-page treatment, which was met with “lukewarm” reception. Simon later developed a script on his own with producer David Permut and director Herbert Ross. King filed a lawsuit against Simon and The Walt Disney Company, which was later settled out of court in King’s favor with a sum “well into six figures.” Disney executive and King’s childhood friend, Jeffrey Katzenberg, brokered the settlement.
       According to an article by Anne Thompson in the 31 Aug 1990 issue of LA Weekly, Simon generally received $2.5 million a script at that time. Thompson also revealed that Herbert Ross had not been able to come to financial terms with Disney and Hollywood Pictures executives, and that the studio had recommended Jerry Rees, who directed the animated film The Brave Little Toaster (1987), as Ross’s replacement.
       The 16 Dec 1989 issue of Screen International revealed that Kim Basinger dropped out of the project because she wanted Kevin Costner to replace Alec Baldwin. However, the same column on 10 Feb 1990 stated that she had since ended her romance with recording star Prince, and walked out of a film he was preparing to return to The Marrying ... More Less

In his 23 Mar 1989 “Just for Variety” DV column, and again on 1 Aug 1989 and 8 Apr 1991, Army Archerd reported that comedian-producer Alan King was upset with writer Neil Simon, whom he met at the Grand Champions tennis tournament in 1988. He told Simon the story of Harry Karl, who married Marie “The Body” McDonald four different times, and Simon was reportedly enthusiastic about working with King on the project, producing s fifteen-page treatment, which was met with “lukewarm” reception. Simon later developed a script on his own with producer David Permut and director Herbert Ross. King filed a lawsuit against Simon and The Walt Disney Company, which was later settled out of court in King’s favor with a sum “well into six figures.” Disney executive and King’s childhood friend, Jeffrey Katzenberg, brokered the settlement.
       According to an article by Anne Thompson in the 31 Aug 1990 issue of LA Weekly, Simon generally received $2.5 million a script at that time. Thompson also revealed that Herbert Ross had not been able to come to financial terms with Disney and Hollywood Pictures executives, and that the studio had recommended Jerry Rees, who directed the animated film The Brave Little Toaster (1987), as Ross’s replacement.
       The 16 Dec 1989 issue of Screen International revealed that Kim Basinger dropped out of the project because she wanted Kevin Costner to replace Alec Baldwin. However, the same column on 10 Feb 1990 stated that she had since ended her romance with recording star Prince, and walked out of a film he was preparing to return to The Marrying Man.
       An article in the 22 Apr 1991 issue of People magazine detailed numerous production problems on the film, which went nearly a month beyond its fifty-two-day shooting schedule and $6 million over its $20 million budget. In May 1990, three weeks before the start of principal photography, Basinger and Baldwin met and became romantically involved. Details noted that Basinger was paid $2.5 million for her role, and that she demanded the replacement of the original director of photography, Ian Baker, because she did not like the way she looked in test footage. A 5 Apr 1991 LADN article also noted Disney executives’ complaints that Basinger had taken too much time in hair and makeup, which was tabulated by the studio in attempt to deduct it from her fee. Rumors indicated that Baldwin was prone to losing his temper, and tensions were exacerbated, according to People, because of the stars’ intense off-screen affair. An article in the Feb 1991 issue of Premiere magazine also documented the film’s difficult production history.
       On 5 Sep 1990, DV reported that although production had been scheduled to be completed by 17 Aug 1990, director Jerry Rees came down with pneumonia. After a brief suspension, filming resumed on 4 Sep 1990, and was scheduled for completion on 18 Sep 1990. Sometime later, the studio decided to write a new ending, and the stars and director were called back for re-shoots. The modifications did not play well with test audiences, however, and the film was released with its original ending. On 11 Mar 1991 Var stated that the picture did not “perform well in research screenings,” and noted that it had had thirteen such screenings when “three is the norm.” Despite “some frantic fine tuning before its April release date,” The Marrying Man was met with similarly negative reviews from critics.
       The name of Jules I. Epstein's character, "Maitre d'," is incorrectly spelled in cast credits. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Mar 1989.
---
Daily Variety
1 Aug 1989.
---
Daily Variety
5 Sep 1990.
---
Daily Variety
4 Apr 1991.
---
Daily Variety
8 Apr 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 1991
p. 9, 15.
LA Weekly
31 Aug 1990.
---
Los Angeles Daily News
5 Apr 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
5 Apr 1991
p. 13.
New York Times
5 Apr 1991
p. 6.
People
22 Apr 1991.
---
Premiere
Feb 1991.
---
Screen International
16 Dec 1989.
---
Screen International
12 Apr 1991.
---
Variety
11 Mar 1991.
---
Variety
8 Apr 1991
p. 67.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Hollywood Pictures presents
in association with Silver Screen Partners IV
A David Permut production
in association with Odyssey Entertainment Ltd.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
Unit prod mgr, Addl photog
1st asst dir, Addl photog
2d asst dir, Addl photog
2d 2d asst dir, Addl photog
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Best boy electric
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Still photog
Gaffer, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboard illustrator
Storyboard illustrator
Storyboard artist
Art dir, Addl photog
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
2d asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dresser
Leadman
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Set des
Set des
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const gang boss
Scenic artist
Set dec, Addl photog
Prop master, Addl photog
Const coord, Addl photog
Sign foreman
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Prop maker
Painter
Painter
Painter
Laborer
Laborer
Laborer
Laborer
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Set dressing driver
Set dressing driver
Const driver
Const driver
Const driver
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Ms. Basinger's costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Cutter and fitter
MUSIC
Tenor saxophone solos played by
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Mus coord
Mus contractor
Songs mixed by
Songs conducted by
Songs rec by
Songs rec by
Song assoc prod
Soundtrack songs prod by
Soundtrack available on
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Foley by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Supv re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
Sd mixer, Addl photog
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Title des
Opticals
Spec eff
DANCE
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Ms. Basinger's makeup by
Body makeup
Ms. Basinger's hairstylist
Ms. Basinger's hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Asst makeup artist
Makeup for Ms. Basinger and Mr. Baldwin, Addl phot
Key makeup, Addl photog
Key hairstylist, Addl photog
Key hairstylist, Additional photog
Makeup driver
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod supv
Mr. Basinger's vocal consultant
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst to Neil Simon
Asst to David Permut
Asst to David Streit
Asst to Jerry Rees
Asst to Kim Basinger
Asst to Alec Baldwin
Asst loc mgr
Asst prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Accounting asst
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Driver
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Set paramedic
First aid
First aid
Craft service
Prod coord, Addl photog
Transportation coord, Addl photog
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Const foreman
Const foreman
SOURCES
SONGS
"Let's Do It," written by Cole Porter
"Murder He Says," written by Frank Loesser and Jimmy McHugh
"Why Can't You Behave," written by Cole Porter
+
SONGS
"Let's Do It," written by Cole Porter
"Murder He Says," written by Frank Loesser and Jimmy McHugh
"Why Can't You Behave," written by Cole Porter
"Honeysuckle Rose," written by Andy Razaf and Thomas Waller
"Satisfy My Soul," written by Buddy Johnson
"Love Is The Thing," written by Ned Washington and Victor Popular Young, performed by Kim Basinger
"Stompin' At The Savoy," written by Benny Goodman, Edgar Sampson and Chick Webb
"L. D.'s Bounce," written by Tim Hauser
"You're Driving Me Crazy (What Did I Do?)," written by Walter Donaldson, performed by Alan Paul
"Mama Look A Boo Boo," written by Lord Melody (Fitzroy Alexander), performed by Tim Hauser
"You Can't Be Mine (And Someone Else's Too)," written by J. C. Johnson and Chick Webb, performed by Billie Holiday, courtesy of Sony Music Licensing Department
"Yardbird Suite," written by Charlie Parker, performed by Charlie Parker, courtesy of Stash Records.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Too Hot to Handle
Release Date:
5 April 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 5 April 1991
Production Date:
summer--late 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Hollywood Pictures Company
Copyright Date:
10 April 1991
Copyright Number:
PA511339
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Produced and distributed on Eastman Film
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
116
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31059
SYNOPSIS

In 1956 San Francisco, California, friends Phil, Sammy, Tony, and George hear the voice of Vicki Anderson coming from Dexter’s jazz club, and get out of their cab to go inside. As they listen to her sing, Phil reminisces back to June 1948, when his friend, Charley Pearl, heir to a toothpaste fortune, announced his engagement to Adele Horner, the daughter of Hollywood film producer Lew Horner. During the engagement party, Lew Horner calls Charley into his den and attempts to discover what makes Charley tick. His real concern is over Charley’s financial independence, and he threatens the boy if he should ever hurt Adele or his studio. Two days Later, Charley and his four friends drive to Las Vegas, Nevada, for a bachelor party. Stopping at a service station to repair a flat tire, Charley calls Adele in Los Angeles and tells her he is going to leave his friends and return to California to be with her. When questioned by his companions, Charley tells them he misses Adele, but that they should not worry, as he will still cover the costs of their party. Stopping for drinks at the El Rancho Vegas hotel and casino, Charley is enchanted by lounge singer Vicki Anderson. Sammy approaches the bandleader to ask if Vicki will have a drink with them after her set, but he discovers she is the moll of the notorious gangster, Bugsy Siegel. With his friends afraid for their lives, Charley sends them away in a cab, and tells them he is returning to Los Angeles. Instead, he goes back into the casino. After the last show, Charley sits alone ... +


In 1956 San Francisco, California, friends Phil, Sammy, Tony, and George hear the voice of Vicki Anderson coming from Dexter’s jazz club, and get out of their cab to go inside. As they listen to her sing, Phil reminisces back to June 1948, when his friend, Charley Pearl, heir to a toothpaste fortune, announced his engagement to Adele Horner, the daughter of Hollywood film producer Lew Horner. During the engagement party, Lew Horner calls Charley into his den and attempts to discover what makes Charley tick. His real concern is over Charley’s financial independence, and he threatens the boy if he should ever hurt Adele or his studio. Two days Later, Charley and his four friends drive to Las Vegas, Nevada, for a bachelor party. Stopping at a service station to repair a flat tire, Charley calls Adele in Los Angeles and tells her he is going to leave his friends and return to California to be with her. When questioned by his companions, Charley tells them he misses Adele, but that they should not worry, as he will still cover the costs of their party. Stopping for drinks at the El Rancho Vegas hotel and casino, Charley is enchanted by lounge singer Vicki Anderson. Sammy approaches the bandleader to ask if Vicki will have a drink with them after her set, but he discovers she is the moll of the notorious gangster, Bugsy Siegel. With his friends afraid for their lives, Charley sends them away in a cab, and tells them he is returning to Los Angeles. Instead, he goes back into the casino. After the last show, Charley sits alone at the bar when Vicki sits down next to him. Although she shows no interest, Charley forces conversation by promising to introduce her to record and movie executives. The bartender calls Bugsy’s goons, but Charley and Vicki manage to convince them that Charley does not pose a threat. Charley quietly asks to meet the singer later that night. She is afraid they could both be killed, but Charley is willing to take the risk. When Charley arrives at Vicki’s place, she says she believes Siegel is about to dump her, and is curious about what Charley can do for her career. As they seduce each other on the floor, Siegel calls. Vicki’s breathlessness arouses Siegel’s suspicion, prompting the gangster to sneak into her house and sit quietly in the dark while she and Charley become intimate. He suddenly turns on the light, revealing himself to the panicked lovers. Believing Vicki will make Charlie miserable, Siegel forces them to get married, and photos of the ceremony are issued to the press. Driving back to Los Angeles, the unhappy newlyweds discuss annulment. When they stop in a town along their route, they see the newspaper headlines announcing their marriage. As Charley gets back into the car, Vicki refuses to go along. In a meeting with Lew Horner, Charley asks to postpone his wedding to Adele for three months until the annulment goes through, but Horner is furious, and throws Charley out of the house. In response to his letters of contrition, Adele comes to Charley’s home to tell him that she will be going to Europe with her father for three months, and that he can call her when they return. Lew eventually consents to Adele marrying Charley on condition that the wedding be unpublicized, and that Charley put up a $500,000 “bond,” payable to an orphanage, to be forfeited if the ceremony does not take place. Charley and his friends attend a nightclub opening for their friend Tony, but the warm-up act is ill, and Vicki steps in, making her Los Angeles singing debut. Charley excuses himself to Vicki’s dressing room and waits for her to finish her set. Unable to contain themselves, Charley and Vicki make love. They decide to marry again, and Horner sends two thugs to work Charley over before he and Vicki can get away on their honeymoon. Charley’s friends begin finding success in Hollywood, but Vicki struggles to get work because Horner has had her blacklisted. She finally scores an audition for a musical at a less-than-reputable studio; however, Charley’s ailing father wants to meet Vicki in Boston, Massachusetts. She agrees to forego the audition, but Charley’s father dies before he can meet her, and Bugsy Siegel’s new girl friend wins the part the in the show. Now in charge of the family business, Charley tells Vicki they need to stay in Boston for at least two years while he sorts out the company’s affairs. She agrees, but their marriage suffers, and at the end of two years, Vicki gives Charley an ultimatum. By the winter of 1950, she files for divorce. In the spring, Charley’s friend Sammy is about to get married and the five friends return to Las Vegas for a bachelor party. On the way, Charley discovers that Vicki is again singing at the El Rancho Vegas hotel and casino. Against his friends’ admonitions, Charley persuades them to stop for a drink. As Vicki performs, a waiter delivers a bottle of champagne to Charley’s table, compliments of the new club owner, Gus Donato, who has taken over since Siegel was gunned down in a gangland killing. They ask the waiter to have Vicki join them after her set, but he tells them she does not drink with customers. In Vicki’s dressing room, Charley is upset that Vicki has seemingly regressed in her life. They fight, and Gus and his henchmen intervene. With the aid of his friends, Charley escapes with Vicki to a motor court with just two vacant cabins. Vicki takes one, and the five friends are left to share the other. Later that night, Charley enters Vicki’s cabin through a window she has deliberately left open. Before they become involved, Vicki demands they talk. She still wants to be a singer, and he still wants to be a chairman on the board of his company. He tells her has given up his stock options and sold his house, and she tells him she came back to the El Rancho Vegas because she knew it was the one place he would find her. He proposes that they get married again in the morning, and they do. Charley builds a movie studio to promote Vicki’s career, but life intervenes. Before Vicki can star in a film, she gives birth to four children over a period of several years. The studio goes bankrupt, and Charley loses his money. Vicki must go back to work as a nightclub singer to support the family. Vicki and Charley’s friends have all made it big, but Charley is down on his luck. Tony is now getting married and has bought the house that once belonged to Lew Horner. As they arrive at the engagement party, Charley and Vicki fight. Charley reveals his resentment for Vicki, claiming their relationship forced him to sacrifice too many things in his life. In a rage, she tells him she never wants to see him again. They divorce for a third time. Back in 1956 San Francisco, Phil, Sammy, Tony, and George watch Vicki sing at Dexter’s jazz club when Charley enters. He mentions that he is now working in the field of computers. They ask if Vicki knows he is in town and he says he comes to hear her two or three times a week. Charley pulls out an engagement ring, asking if they think she will like it. During her act, Vicki descends from the stage to join the audience. She teases the boys before giving Charley a kiss. When she returns to the stage, the engagement ring is missing. As Charley desperately looks for it, Phil points out that Vicky is already wearing it. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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