Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear (1991)

PG-13 | 85 mins | Comedy | 28 June 1991

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HISTORY

The following credits are joke credits:
       "What the hell is a grip? Person responsible for maintenance and adjustments to equipment on the set"
       "General Schwarzkopf: Welcome Home"
       "George Foreman: 6'4," 250 lbs., Age: 42, Won: 69, Lost: 3, KO's: 65"
       "Impressionist painters: Vincent Van Gogh, Edgar 'Skip' Degas"
       "Stock answer: 'I'll have it ready in the morning'"
       The 9 Dec 1988 DV “Just For Variety” column noted that Paramount Pictures had asked David Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and Jerry Zucker to develop a sequel to their 1988 movie The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! (see entry).
       The 31 Oct 1990 DV carried an item stating that Paramount Pictures put out a press release the previous day extending regrets for “its inability to stop the start of production for Naked Gun 2 ½: The Smell of Fear on 14 Nov 1990. However, the 27 Nov 1990 HR production chart and studio production notes in AMPAS library files report that principal photography actually got underway on 27 Nov 1990 in San Pedro, CA, which doubled for Washington, D. C.
       A note in the HR “Rambling Reporter” column of 11 Feb 1991 noted that Paramount executives were so pleased with the footage they were seeing on Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear that they were already planning a third film in the series some four months before the release of The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear. . The sequel would eventually be released as Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult (1994, see entry).
       ... More Less

The following credits are joke credits:
       "What the hell is a grip? Person responsible for maintenance and adjustments to equipment on the set"
       "General Schwarzkopf: Welcome Home"
       "George Foreman: 6'4," 250 lbs., Age: 42, Won: 69, Lost: 3, KO's: 65"
       "Impressionist painters: Vincent Van Gogh, Edgar 'Skip' Degas"
       "Stock answer: 'I'll have it ready in the morning'"
       The 9 Dec 1988 DV “Just For Variety” column noted that Paramount Pictures had asked David Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and Jerry Zucker to develop a sequel to their 1988 movie The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! (see entry).
       The 31 Oct 1990 DV carried an item stating that Paramount Pictures put out a press release the previous day extending regrets for “its inability to stop the start of production for Naked Gun 2 ½: The Smell of Fear on 14 Nov 1990. However, the 27 Nov 1990 HR production chart and studio production notes in AMPAS library files report that principal photography actually got underway on 27 Nov 1990 in San Pedro, CA, which doubled for Washington, D. C.
       A note in the HR “Rambling Reporter” column of 11 Feb 1991 noted that Paramount executives were so pleased with the footage they were seeing on Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear that they were already planning a third film in the series some four months before the release of The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear. . The sequel would eventually be released as Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult (1994, see entry).
       A trade ad in the 3 Jul 1991 DV noted that the box-office gross for the film in its first three days of release was $20,817,139.
       The 16 Apr 1992 HR carried a story reporting that the law firm of Myman, Abell, Fineman & Greespan, successor in interest to the firm of Shagin & Myman, filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court, claiming that Shagin & Myman, which represented David Zucker, Jim Abrahams, Jerry Zucker from 1976 to 1986, were not paid percentages they were to have received from the films Top Secret (1994, see entry), The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! , and Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear. The claim was for 2.5% from Top Secret and 10% each from the Naked Gun movies to have come from compensation received by the three filmmakers. The outcome of this lawsuit could not be determined.


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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1988
---
Daily Variety
31 Oct 1990
---
Daily Variety
3 Jul 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Nov 1990
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 1991
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jun 1991
p. 8, 61.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 Jun 1991
p. 1.
New York Times
28 Jun 1991
p. 8.
Variety
1 Jul 1991
pp. 34-35.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
People who acted in the movie:
Peter Mark Richman
"Ladies and gentlemen, the President of the United States and Mrs. Bush."
"Hey Ken, Al! Look what I found."
"Hey, that's a pretty nice clock."
"It's 4 minutes too slow."
"Very well, sir. It's from the lady."
"Always nice to see nice people."
"You pigs...say your prayers."
"Is this some kind of bust?"
"Frank, we got that Sure-Grip suck machine..."
"Your coat, sir?"
"Phone call, Commissioner"
"Hey, what the hell happened to the water pressure?"
"For a man in a wheelchair, he gets around marvelously."
"He's wired!"
"¡Ojala que se mejoré pronto!"
"Recuerdos a todos."
"¿Puede decirme donde esta la casa de musica?"
"Hey, look what he's doing to that man in the wheelchair!"
"Let's get him."
"Yeah!"
"You're on my groin."
"If that's your attitude, forget it."
People who didn't have lines, but we like 'em:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures presents
A Zucker Abrahams Zucker production
un film de David Zucker
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Chief lighting tech
Matte supv
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
B cam 1st asst photog
Panaglide op
Film loader
Loaded filmer
Video assist
Video assist
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
1st company grip
1st company grip
1st company grip
Crane grip
Dolly grip
Poli-grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
Storyboard illustrator
Matte artist
Art dept secy
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Prop master
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
Set des
Set costumer
Set costumer
Asst prop master
Prop person
Prop person
Gen foreman
Foreman
Foreman
Foreman
Propmaker
Propmaker
Prod painter
Prod painter
Const secy
Set const
Laborer
Laborer
Greensperson
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Addl orch by
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Boom op
Cable person
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
ADR mixer
Voice casting
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
SFX tech
SFX tech
SFX tech
SFX tech
Paramount spec eff
Paramount spec eff
Paramount spec eff
Paramount spec eff
Paramount spec eff
Paramount spec eff
Paramount spec eff
Titles and opticals
Titles des by
DANCE
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairdresser
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Asst to David Zucker
Mr. Goodman's hearing aid
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Scr supv
Cross dresser
Cross dresser
Transportation coord
Secy to Mr. Weiss
Asst prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
General Schwarzkopf
Driver capt
Co-capt
Navigator
Bombardier
2d unit capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Deep sea diver
Deep sea diver
Deep sea diver
Deep sea diver
Asst prod accountant
3d asst accountant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant-Ceramics
Casting assoc
Casting coord
Extras casting
Craft service
Prod medic
Environmental consultant
Caterer
Stock librarian
K.A.B.O.O.M. acronym
COLOR PERSONNEL
Processing compositing by
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the television series Police Squad! by Jim Abrahams, David Zucker & Jerry Zucker.
SONGS
“I Guess I’m Just Screwed,” music by Ira Newborn, lyric by David Zucker& Robert LeCash, performed by Colleen Fitzpatrick
“Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead,” by Harold Arlen & E.Y. Harburg
“Tangerine,” by Johnny Mercer & Victor Schertzinger
+
SONGS
“I Guess I’m Just Screwed,” music by Ira Newborn, lyric by David Zucker& Robert LeCash, performed by Colleen Fitzpatrick
“Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead,” by Harold Arlen & E.Y. Harburg
“Tangerine,” by Johnny Mercer & Victor Schertzinger
“Satin Doll,” by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn & Johnny Mercer
“They Way We Were,” by Marvin Hamlisch, Alan Bergman & Marilyn Bergman
“Unchained Melody,” by Alex North & Hy Zaret, performed by The Righteous Brothers, courtesy of PolyGram Group Distribution, Inc
“Ebb Tide,” by Robert Maxwell & Carl Sigman, performed by The Righteous Brothers, courtesy of PolyGram Group Distribution, Inc
“Lifespan,” by Nikki Bernard
“Born To Rock,” written and performed by Jon Paris
“Besame Mucho,” by Consuelo Velasquez & Sunny Skylar.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Smell of Fear: From the Files of The Naked Gun
Release Date:
28 June 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 June 1991
Production Date:
began 27 November 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
16 July 1991
Copyright Number:
PA528761
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Duration(in mins):
85
Length(in feet):
30973
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

At a White House state dinner in Washington, D. C., President George H. W. Bush, is accompanied by his wife, Barbara. Suddenly a door opens as police lieutenant Frank Drebin comes out of the men’s room, smashing the first lady in the face. Before Barbara Bush can take her seat she suffers several more indignities at the inadvertent hands of Frank, who is being honored for the 1,000th drug dealer he has killed in the line of duty. The President calls upon Washington, D. C. police commissioner Annabelle Brumford who introduces Frank. The real reason for the dinner is the announcement that President Bush intends to base his administration’s energy policies on the recommendations of Dr. Albert S. Meinheimer, who will present his recommendations at the National Press Club dinner the following Tuesday. Energy company leaders, however, are concerned that Meinheimer might be too “chummy” with environmentalists bent on thwarting their exploitation of Earth’s resources. Late that evening, at the Meinheimer Institute, Jane Spencer is heavy hearted over her breakup with Frank Drebin. Dr. Meinheimer attempts to cheer her up, and urges her to get on with her life. Meanwhile, a Meinheimer Institute security officer discovers a bomb left in a wastebasket. While he and his fellow guards admire the clock, one of the guards resets the timepiece because it is four minutes slow, and the bomb explodes. The next morning, Frank is called to the scene, and is surprised to see his former girl friend, Jane Spencer, unaware she had moved to the nation’s capitol. Dr. Meinheimer and Jane conduct Frank on a tour of the ... +


At a White House state dinner in Washington, D. C., President George H. W. Bush, is accompanied by his wife, Barbara. Suddenly a door opens as police lieutenant Frank Drebin comes out of the men’s room, smashing the first lady in the face. Before Barbara Bush can take her seat she suffers several more indignities at the inadvertent hands of Frank, who is being honored for the 1,000th drug dealer he has killed in the line of duty. The President calls upon Washington, D. C. police commissioner Annabelle Brumford who introduces Frank. The real reason for the dinner is the announcement that President Bush intends to base his administration’s energy policies on the recommendations of Dr. Albert S. Meinheimer, who will present his recommendations at the National Press Club dinner the following Tuesday. Energy company leaders, however, are concerned that Meinheimer might be too “chummy” with environmentalists bent on thwarting their exploitation of Earth’s resources. Late that evening, at the Meinheimer Institute, Jane Spencer is heavy hearted over her breakup with Frank Drebin. Dr. Meinheimer attempts to cheer her up, and urges her to get on with her life. Meanwhile, a Meinheimer Institute security officer discovers a bomb left in a wastebasket. While he and his fellow guards admire the clock, one of the guards resets the timepiece because it is four minutes slow, and the bomb explodes. The next morning, Frank is called to the scene, and is surprised to see his former girl friend, Jane Spencer, unaware she had moved to the nation’s capitol. Dr. Meinheimer and Jane conduct Frank on a tour of the research facility. During the tour, Quentin Hapsburg, of Hexagon Oil Company, arrives. Quentin has been dating Jane for some time. In a jealous fit, Frank claims he has been keeping company with an author who wrote a book about male sexual dysfunction—a book he is certain Hapsburg has read. Jane suggests Hapsburg leave, and she agrees to meet him later in the evening. At the Blue Note cabaret, Frank Drebin commiserates with himself over losing Jane’s affections. Ed Hocken sits with Frank, who is envious that Ed is married and with the same woman every day of his life, while he is alone and must run around every night with a different 20-year-old girl who wants nothing but sex. Ed foams at the mouth, equally envious of Frank’s lifestyle. A waiter brings Frank a drink he did not order, and tells him, “It’s from the lady.” Frank sees Jane across the room, and Ed urges him to go to Jane. When Frank sits down, Jane tells him she recalls something: a red van parked across the street from the Meinheimer Institute just before the bomb exploded. However, their meeting soon turns into an argument over old issues. Jane claims Frank was only interested in police work, while he asserts she only cared about preserving the “end zone layer.” “Ozone layer,” she corrects him. When Frank reminds Jane that he bought a thousand acres in the rain forest and had it cleared so they could build their dream home, she storms out asking how he could be so insensitive? Meanwhile, the energy company leaders discuss their failure to do away with Dr. Meinheimer. As they argue, Quentin Hapsburg arrives and tells them he has kidnapped the real Dr. Meinheimer and will have look-alike Earl Hacker advocate for coal, oil and nuclear energy when he delivers the Tuesday speech in Meinheimer’s stead. Clues lead Frank to search for boxer Hector Savage at Monique DeCarlo’s AC/DC Love Boutique in the city’s red light district. When Ed Hocken, Officer Nordberg, and Frank Drebin arrive at the sex toy shop, Frank notices a red van parked outside. He has Nordberg plant a “bug” under the van in order to track it, while he and Ed go in to question Monique. Ed notices suspected bomber Hector Savage getting into the van. Savage drives off, but Nordberg has his hand caught in the van’s undercarriage and is dragged along. Frank and Ed are able to track the van as long as Nordberg is dragged along, but when he extricates himself, Nordberg careens recklessly down a hill on his wheeled mechanic’s “creeper.” Frank tracks the “bug,” thrilled that it is getting closer. He has Ed Hocken step on the gas just as Nordberg rolls under the police car, and is again dragged along the road. They come upon police surrounding a house at which the red van is parked. Frank orders Ed Hocken to stop, but as their car brakes, Nordberg shoots out from under the front end, and he rolls under a bus, and is again dragged off down the road to Detroit. When Frank is briefed on the situation, he is told the red van is registered to Quentin Hapsburg. Frank pats a SWAT team member on the back and asks how he is doing, causing the cop to accidentally fire his gun. The other officers riddle the home with bullets. Ed Hocken grabs a bullhorn and calls for the police to stop firing. Frank demands Hector Savage throw down his gun and come out, but the criminal refuses. In response, Frank climbs into a tank and plows through the house, allowing Savage an avenue of escape. The tank ultimately stops when Frank crashes into the Washington Zoo, allowing the animals to escape. At an event, Hapsburg becomes jealous when he sees Frank Drebin dancing with Jane, and calls Frank to his table. When Frank raises the issue of the red van being registered in his name, Hapsburg claims to have lots of vans, and one was stolen three days before. When Dr. Meinheimer comes to the table, he does not recall meeting Frank until Hapsburg reminds him. Commissioner Annabelle Brumford calls on Meinheimer to draw the ticket for a raffle prize, but when the false doctor has trouble negotiating his wheelchair, Frank takes over, and unconsciously crashes the wheelchair into a dining cart. Hot coffee spills in the false doctor’s lap, causing his electric wheelchair to short out. The wheelchair careens around the ballroom, and goes flying out the balcony with the false Meinheimer still in it. Later that night, Frank arrives at Jane’s apartment. As he enters the building, Hector Savage drives up and sees Frank go in. Inside, Frank wonders aloud why Meinheimer, who has a photographic memory, did not remember him at the table. In response to his questions, Jane reveals that Dr. Meinheimer has a birthmark shaped like “Whistler’s Mother” on his right buttock. He asks if Jane has recognized anything different about Meinheimer lately, and she replies, “Only that he’s a foot taller and he seems to be left-handed now.” Jane is upset that Frank is suggesting that Hapsburg has substituted a double for the real Meinheimer. As Jane takes a shower, Frank uses her phone to call Ed Hocken. Hector Savage sneaks into Jane’s apartment. Frank thwarts the attack, but in the struggle as Savage attempts to get away, Frank shoves a hallway fire hose nozzle into Savage’s mouth and turns on the water. He barely gets back into Jane’s apartment before Savage explodes from over-saturation. Frank shows Jane the Hapsburg Valdez Warehouse 39 dock pass that Savage carried, and Jane berates herself for being taken in by Quentin Hapsburg. She becomes determined to help Dr. Meinheimer. But as Frank sets out for Warehouse 39, Jane declares she ran away from him once, but cannot do it again. She asks Frank to stay with her. Later, on a boat, Ed Hocken and Frank Drebin keep Warehouse 39 under surveillance. Frank swims ashore in SCUBA gear and comes to the surface near a large pipe pumping raw sewage into the bay. Meanwhile, in the warehouse, the energy company leaders watch television commercial demos for their nefarious products. When Frank shoots a grappling hook into the warehouse yard, he accidentally snares a guard dog, and when he climbs to the roof comes face to face with the dog. Meanwhile, Nordberg attempts to cut electrical power to the warehouse, but instead cuts his safety line and is stranded upside down on the power pole. Chased by the dog, Frank falls through a skylight and crashes onto the conference table where the energy company leaders are meeting. Hapsburg promises Frank Drebin a slow and painful death. The police truck is backed up against the power pole, and when Frank transmits the signal to his back up force, the truck's rear doors cannot be opened. Hapsburg has Frank tied up. He plans to go to the Police Club dinner where the fake Dr. Meinheimer will deliver his address. Upon his return, Hapsburg intends to kill Frank himself. While the sole guard left behind listens to music on headphones, Frank attempts to cut the rope binding him. However, he rubs his tied hands over the smooth metal corner of a rack, causing objects on the top shelf to bounce off Meinheimer’s head. The Police Squad finally arrives, subdues the guard, and rescues Frank and Meinheimer. They race to the Press Club dinner. At the banquet hall, Commissioner Brumford orders her people to arrest any Police Squad members they see. Jane is supposed to meet the Police Squad at the rear entrance to the hotel, but she is discovered by Hapsburg, who insists she follow him to his table. When Frank, Hocken, Nordberg and the real Dr. Meinheimer are unable to get in, they spot a mariachi band hired to entertain for the evening. Inside, as President Bush is introduced, the curtains open to reveal the four heroes dressed in borrowed mariachi costumes. As they perform to keep up their cover, Frank volunteers to head off the fake Meinheimer while Ed Hocken prepares the real Meinheimer to make his speech. The fake Meinheimer, Earl Hacker, gets away from Frank and attacks Ed Hocken. The real Meinheimer slashes a stage rope with a fire axe causing a sandbag to hit Ed instead of Hacker. Meinheimer knocks out Hacker on his second try, but Hacker falls into a powered wheelchair and rolls on stage, falling off the other side as the attendees gasp in horror. Hacker rises from his wheelchair, and the audience is astounded to see “Dr. Meinheimer” walking. As Hacker storms out of the hall, the real Meinheimer comes on stage. But, Frank is unaware the switch has been made, and warns the audience not to listen to anything the doctor has to say. He pulls down Meinheimer’s pants, expecting to reveal that Hacker does not have the Whistler’s Mother shaped birthmark. As the audience gasps, Frank rips the doctor’s pants, and the birthmark is revealed. Believing it is painted on, Frank attempts to erase the birthmark. Ed Hocken enters with a signed confession from Hacker and publicly accuses Hapsburg, but the villain escapes with Jane. The Police Squad follows Hapsburg and Jane to the hotel roof, where a gun battle ensues. Frank pursues Hapsburg into the control room, where the scoundrel activates “Plan B” to detonate a nuclear device that will wipe out anyone listening to Meinheimer’s speech. Hapsburg is the only one who knows the abort code. When Nordberg distracts Hapsburg, Frank gets the upper hand, but as he holds the scoundrel out the window, Ed Hocken accidentally pushes Hapsburg out. Hapsburg lands fortuitously on the hotel awning and escapes death, but as he prepares to escape, he is attacked by a lion that escaped from the zoo. With less than four minutes before the nuclear bomb explodes, Ed Hocken and Nordberg go to warn the banquet attendees, but find them asleep in reaction to Dr. Meinheimer’s droning speech. Hocken hands Meinheimer a pornographic novel to read from and arouse the crowd. As they awaken, Nordberg asks them to calmly leave the hotel, but accidentally lets slip a bomb is about to go off. The crowd panics. Upstairs, Frank fails to disarm the bomb, but at the last moment when he and Jane run for their lives, Frank trips over the power cord, disconnecting it, and the bomb firing sequence shuts down. Afterward, President Bush offers Frank a new assignment as head of the Federal Bureau of Police Squad, but Frank turns down the job to marry Jane. As Frank, Jane, President and Mrs. Bush are on the balcony to greet the crowd, a photographer calls for Frank to turn around and have his picture taken. As he turns, Frank knocks Barbara Bush over the balustrade, ripping her dress off in the process, and leaving her hanging for dear life from the balcony. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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