Moon Over Parador (1988)

PG-13 | 104 mins | Romantic comedy | 9 September 1988

Director:

Paul Mazursky

Producer:

Paul Mazursky

Cinematographer:

Donald McAlpine

Editor:

Stuart Pappé

Production Designer:

Pato Guzman

Production Company:

Universal Pictures
Full page view
HISTORY

As noted in 9 Sep 1988 NYT and 13 Dec 1987 LAT articles, the script was influenced by the 1939 film, The Magnificent Fraud, (see entry). According to the 13 Dec 1987 LAT, director Paul Mazursky and writer Leon Capetanos came up with the fictional country of "Parador" for the film’s setting after traveling throughout countries in Latin America and the Caribbean for research in Apr 1986.
       The 25 Aug 1987 DV production chart stated that principal photography was scheduled to begin in Oct 1987 in Brazil. However, an article in the 18 Nov 1987 Var noted that crews arrived on 17 Aug 1987, and filming wrapped on 26 Oct 1987, three days ahead of schedule. Production notes in AMPAS library files list the following locations in Brazil: Ouro Preto; the Municipal Theater in Rio de Janeiro; and Salvador de Bahia. Articles in the 8 Aug 1987 Screen International and 29 Nov 1987 LAT cited a budget of approximately $19-$20 million.
       The 19 Aug 1987 Var reported that complaints were lodged against the production by the Association of Workers in the Cinema Industry (Atec) to Brazil’s Labor Secretary, claiming “only 14 of the 79 foreign artists and technicians hold a visa good for working in Brazilian territory.” The production was ordered to pay a levy of $2 million, and would be fined $8,500 per day until the issue was resolved. Producers planned to appeal the fine.
       The 22 Aug 1988 People and 9 Sep 1988 NYT stated that ... More Less

As noted in 9 Sep 1988 NYT and 13 Dec 1987 LAT articles, the script was influenced by the 1939 film, The Magnificent Fraud, (see entry). According to the 13 Dec 1987 LAT, director Paul Mazursky and writer Leon Capetanos came up with the fictional country of "Parador" for the film’s setting after traveling throughout countries in Latin America and the Caribbean for research in Apr 1986.
       The 25 Aug 1987 DV production chart stated that principal photography was scheduled to begin in Oct 1987 in Brazil. However, an article in the 18 Nov 1987 Var noted that crews arrived on 17 Aug 1987, and filming wrapped on 26 Oct 1987, three days ahead of schedule. Production notes in AMPAS library files list the following locations in Brazil: Ouro Preto; the Municipal Theater in Rio de Janeiro; and Salvador de Bahia. Articles in the 8 Aug 1987 Screen International and 29 Nov 1987 LAT cited a budget of approximately $19-$20 million.
       The 19 Aug 1987 Var reported that complaints were lodged against the production by the Association of Workers in the Cinema Industry (Atec) to Brazil’s Labor Secretary, claiming “only 14 of the 79 foreign artists and technicians hold a visa good for working in Brazilian territory.” The production was ordered to pay a levy of $2 million, and would be fined $8,500 per day until the issue was resolved. Producers planned to appeal the fine.
       The 22 Aug 1988 People and 9 Sep 1988 NYT stated that actress Judith Malina was originally cast in the role of “Momma,” but was unable to appear on location due to another engagement in Germany. Instead, director Paul Mazursky portrayed the character onscreen, and was credited as “Carlotta Gerson.”
       Some sources, including the 30 Mar 1987 DV, referred to the film as The Moon Over Parador.
       A 20 Apr 1988 Var brief noted that the picture was being moved from a spring 1988 release date to 5 Aug 1988. However, the 4 Sep 1988 LAT reported that the film’s opening had originally been scheduled for Jul 1988, and was being pushed even later, to 9 Sep 1988.
       As noted in the 16 Aug 1988 HR, the world premiere took place 4 Sep 1988, on the closing day of the Montréal World Film Festival in Canada. After the picture’s 9 Sep 1988 opening weekend, the 13 Sep 1988 LAT stated that the picture took in $3.3 million at the box-office on 1,145 screens.
       The film was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards in the following categories: Best Supporting Actor--Drama (Raul Julia) and Best Supporting Actress--Drama (Sonia Braga).
       End credits state: “Filmed entirely on location in Rio de Janeiro, Ouro Preto and Salvador de Bahia, Brazil and New York City.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
30 Mar 1987
p. 3.
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1987.
---
Daily Variety
9 Nov 1987
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Aug 1988
p. 4, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 1988
p. 2, 14.
Los Angeles Times
29 Nov 1987
Calendar, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
13 Dec 1987
Calendar, p. 123.
Los Angeles Times
4 Sep 1988
Calendar, p. 73.
Los Angeles Times
9 Sep 1988
Calendar, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
13 Sep 1988
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
9 Sep 1988
Section C, p. 6.
New York Times
9 Sep 1988
Section C, p. 13.
People
22 Aug 1988.
---
Screen International
8 Aug 1987.
---
Variety
19 Aug 1987
p. 43.
Variety
18 Nov 1987
p. 27.
Variety
20 Apr 1988
p. 20.
Variety
31 Aug 1988
p. 38.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Paul Mazursky Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Brazilian 1st asst dir
Asst prod mgr
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Based on a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
Rigging gaffer
Dolly grip
Generator op
Best boy elec
Chief studio elec
Chief grip
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
2d unit cam
Principal video photog
Video asst
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst to art dir
Asst to art dir
Draftsman
Graphics
Sketch artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Ed asst/Brazil
Ed asst/Brazil
Ed asst/Brazil
Post prod supv
Post prod asst
Negative cutter
Negative processing
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop asst
Prop asst
Asst set dec
Asst set dec
Asst set dec
Leadman
Swing gang
Const coord
Sculpture plasterer
Sculpture plasterer
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Assoc cost des
Asst cost des
Asst ward supv
Men`s costumer
Women`s costumer
Asst costumer
Asst costumer
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Asst to Maurice Jarre
Mus rec
Asst rec eng
Military band and mus arr
Mus prod and coord in Brazil
SOUND
Prod sd
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Post prod-dial
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Sd utility
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Title des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Hair des for Richard Dreyfuss
Hairstylist
Asst makeup
Asst makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Brazilian principals & extras casting
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Mazursky
Asst to the prods
Prod coord
Spec projects
Loc mgr
Casting asst - Los Angeles
Casting asst
Casting asst
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Unit pub
Interpreter
Interpreter
Interpreter
Interpreter
Interpreter
Interpreter
Transportation coord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Prod secy - Los Angeles
Helicopter pilot
Military adv
Military adv
Prod auditor
Prod auditor number 2
Wrangler
Wrangler
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col
SOURCES
SONGS
“Ni Te Tango, Ni Ti Olvido,” written by L. Barday, performed by Julio Iglesias, courtesy of Columbia Records
“Begin The Beguine,” written by Cole Porter, performed by Sammy Davis, Jr.
“Besame Mucho,” written by Consuelo Velazquez and Sunny Skylar.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Moon Over Parador
Release Date:
9 September 1988
Premiere Information:
World premiere at Montréal World Film Festival: 4 September 1988
Los Angeles and New York openings: 9 September 1988
Production Date:
17 August--26 October 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 September 1988
Copyright Number:
PA383399
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Panalex® Camera and Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
104
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29217
SYNOPSIS

Actor Jack Noah leaves New York City and arrives in the island country of Parador to begin production on a new motion picture. After filming is complete, Parador’s dictator, President Alphonse Simms, visits the set with Roberto Strausmann, Secretary of the Interior and Head of the National Police. Jack is convinced to stay in Parador City for the Carnival celebration by American expatriates Ralph and Midge. During the festivities, President Simms dies of a heart attack, and Strausmann worries that news of his death will create chaos, allowing the guerilla army fighting led by Dante Guzman to take over the country. Recalling that Jack Noah looked like Simms, Strausmann kidnaps the actor and threatens him to impersonate the dictator. After reviewing recorded speeches given by Simms and with instruction from Strausmann, Jack learns the dictator’s mannerisms. While Jack fools government officials and Parador citizens, Simms’s personal staff realizes that Jack is an actor, but do not divulge the secret. Strausmann secretly plots to take over the government with support from Parador’s fourteen richest families. Meanwhile, President Simms’s mistress, Madonna Mendez, discovers Jack is a phony. Promising not to call him out, Madonna helps Jack perfect his impersonation and tells him about Parador’s impoverished population. Under Madonna’s tutelage, Jack falls in love with her. Strausmann escorts Jack to a secret meeting with a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) operative, and is surprised to find Ralph. At the meeting, Ralph informs them that Dante Guzman and his guerillas are planning an attack against “Simms.” Later, as Jack and Madonna attend a groundbreaking ceremony near a slum, Guzman’s fighters attack. ... +


Actor Jack Noah leaves New York City and arrives in the island country of Parador to begin production on a new motion picture. After filming is complete, Parador’s dictator, President Alphonse Simms, visits the set with Roberto Strausmann, Secretary of the Interior and Head of the National Police. Jack is convinced to stay in Parador City for the Carnival celebration by American expatriates Ralph and Midge. During the festivities, President Simms dies of a heart attack, and Strausmann worries that news of his death will create chaos, allowing the guerilla army fighting led by Dante Guzman to take over the country. Recalling that Jack Noah looked like Simms, Strausmann kidnaps the actor and threatens him to impersonate the dictator. After reviewing recorded speeches given by Simms and with instruction from Strausmann, Jack learns the dictator’s mannerisms. While Jack fools government officials and Parador citizens, Simms’s personal staff realizes that Jack is an actor, but do not divulge the secret. Strausmann secretly plots to take over the government with support from Parador’s fourteen richest families. Meanwhile, President Simms’s mistress, Madonna Mendez, discovers Jack is a phony. Promising not to call him out, Madonna helps Jack perfect his impersonation and tells him about Parador’s impoverished population. Under Madonna’s tutelage, Jack falls in love with her. Strausmann escorts Jack to a secret meeting with a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) operative, and is surprised to find Ralph. At the meeting, Ralph informs them that Dante Guzman and his guerillas are planning an attack against “Simms.” Later, as Jack and Madonna attend a groundbreaking ceremony near a slum, Guzman’s fighters attack. Jack and Madonna hide in the slum house of her friend. Strausmann orders the entire area burned in retaliation against Guzman. Furious at Strausmann for the fire, Jack plans on leaving the country. However, Strausmann orders him to give a televised speech regarding the attack. During the speech, Jack goes off Strausmann’s script, promising to liberate the poor and announcing his engagement to Madonna. Throughout his year pretending to be Parador’s dictator, Jack misses New York, but fears Strausmann will take over the government. At Carnival, Jack and Madonna plan to stage the death of “President Alphonse Simms.” With assistance from Jack’s friend Clint, a movie special effects supervisor, Jack pretends to be shot by a sniper and declares that Strausmann is to blame for his assassination. The crowd swarms Strausmann and kills him. Sneaking away to an airfield, Jack declares his love for Madonna before fleeing the country. Afterward, he leaves. Returning to New York, Jack looks for new acting jobs. On television, he sees a news report stating Parador held its first free election and elected Madonna as its new president. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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