Nothing But Trouble (1991)

PG-13 | 93 mins | Comedy | 15 February 1991

Director:

Dan Aykroyd

Writer:

Dan Aykroyd

Producer:

Robert K. Weiss

Cinematographer:

Dean Cundey

Production Designer:

William Sandell

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY

End credits include the following acknowledgement: “Special thanks to John Hughes.”
       A 12 Jul 1990 DV news brief announced that Git, a Warner Bros. picture helmed and written by actor Dan Akyroyd, had changed its title to Valkenvania. The next day, the 13 Jul 1990 DV published a production chart indicating that principal photography on Valkenvania began 7 May 1990 in Los Angeles, CA. The movie marked Akyroyd’s directorial debut.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that the Valkenheiser mansion, Town Hall, and environs were constructed on two soundstages at Warner Bros. Studios. The designers acquired props and bizarre decorative items from “every prop resource in town,” as well as from Dan Aykroyd’s personal collection. The design of “Autohenge,” a scrap-metal sculpture garden, was inspired by production designer William Sandell’s prior experience as a kinetic sculptor. Off the studio lot, scenes intending to depict “Chris Thorne’s” New York City apartment were filmed at Greystone Mansion in Los Angeles, CA.
       On 31 Aug 1990, the Allentown [PA] Morning Call noted that Valkenvania had filmed scenes in the Lehigh Valley, a region located a little over sixty miles north of Philadelphia, PA. Production notes confirm that second unit photography occurred in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York City.
       In Dec 1990, various contemporary sources announced that Warner Bros. changed the title to Nothing But Trouble. Director Dan Aykroyd, in a 20 Dec 1990 DV news brief, responded by stating that he would always think of the picture as Valkenvania. Although the movie was scheduled to open in Dec 1990, ... More Less

End credits include the following acknowledgement: “Special thanks to John Hughes.”
       A 12 Jul 1990 DV news brief announced that Git, a Warner Bros. picture helmed and written by actor Dan Akyroyd, had changed its title to Valkenvania. The next day, the 13 Jul 1990 DV published a production chart indicating that principal photography on Valkenvania began 7 May 1990 in Los Angeles, CA. The movie marked Akyroyd’s directorial debut.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that the Valkenheiser mansion, Town Hall, and environs were constructed on two soundstages at Warner Bros. Studios. The designers acquired props and bizarre decorative items from “every prop resource in town,” as well as from Dan Aykroyd’s personal collection. The design of “Autohenge,” a scrap-metal sculpture garden, was inspired by production designer William Sandell’s prior experience as a kinetic sculptor. Off the studio lot, scenes intending to depict “Chris Thorne’s” New York City apartment were filmed at Greystone Mansion in Los Angeles, CA.
       On 31 Aug 1990, the Allentown [PA] Morning Call noted that Valkenvania had filmed scenes in the Lehigh Valley, a region located a little over sixty miles north of Philadelphia, PA. Production notes confirm that second unit photography occurred in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York City.
       In Dec 1990, various contemporary sources announced that Warner Bros. changed the title to Nothing But Trouble. Director Dan Aykroyd, in a 20 Dec 1990 DV news brief, responded by stating that he would always think of the picture as Valkenvania. Although the movie was scheduled to open in Dec 1990, its release was pushed back to Feb 1991, according to a 24 Dec 1990 Var news item.
       Critical reception was resoundingly negative, with a 16 Feb 1991 NYT review faulting Aykroyd’s script for its “loose narrative ends,” and a 19 Feb 1991 HR review harshly criticizing the film’s “skit-level” comedic scenes. Although a budget could not be determined, several contemporary reviews noted that the movie’s sets and kinetic gadgetry looked “expensive” and were indicative of a “generous budget.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1990.
---
Daily Variety
13 Jul 1990.
---
Daily Variety
20 Dec 1990.
---
Daily Variety
19 Feb 1991
p. 2, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 1991
p. 6, 97.
Los Angeles Times
18 Feb 1991
p. 14.
Morning Call (Allentown, PA)
31 Aug 1990
Section D, p. 1.
New York Times
16 Feb 1991
p. 1.16.
Variety
24 Dec 1990.
---
Variety
25 Feb 1991
p. 50.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. presents
an Applied Action production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
2d unit 1st asst dir
2d unit 1st asst dir
2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Asst prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Chief lighting tech
1st company grip
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
B-cam op
B-cam 1st asst
Video asst
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer/Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
2d company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
2d unit dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
Cam op, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set dec
Prop master
Supv const coord
Const coord
Asst prop master
Lead person
Lead person
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Propmaker foreperson
Propmaker foreman
Paint foreperson
Standby painter
Greens
COSTUMES
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Cost supv
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Supv sd ed
ADR supv
Foley supv
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Opticals consultant
Matte artist
Initial design graphics by
Miniature eff
Titles and opticals by
Main title design by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
J. P., Bobo & L'il Debbull makeup by
Character makeup supv
Character makeup asst
Character makeup asst
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to Dan Aykroyd
Prod secretary
Prod accountant
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Asst prod secretary
Asst prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Chase
Asst to Mr. Candy
Secy to Mr. Aykroyd
Asst to Ms. Moore
Secretary to Mr. Weiss
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Casting assoc
Unit pub
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Prod assoc
Caterer
Craft service
STAND INS
Stuntman/Stunt coord
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“The Good Life,” written by Jack Reardon and Sacha Distel, arranged, conducted and produced by Marty Paich, performed by Ray Charles, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
“Same Song,” written by Greg Jacobs, Ron Brooks and 2 Pac Shakur, produced by Greg Jacobs, performed by digital underground, courtesy of TNT/Tommy Boy Records
Sample taken from “Theme From The Black Hole,” written by George Clinton, Jim Vitti, J. S. Teracon and Bootsy Collins, performed by Parliament, courtesy of PolyGram Special products, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
“The Good Life,” written by Jack Reardon and Sacha Distel, arranged, conducted and produced by Marty Paich, performed by Ray Charles, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
“Same Song,” written by Greg Jacobs, Ron Brooks and 2 Pac Shakur, produced by Greg Jacobs, performed by digital underground, courtesy of TNT/Tommy Boy Records
Sample taken from “Theme From The Black Hole,” written by George Clinton, Jim Vitti, J. S. Teracon and Bootsy Collins, performed by Parliament, courtesy of PolyGram Special products, a division of PolyGram Records, Inc.
Sample taken from “I’m In The Mood For Love (Moody’s Mood),” written by Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields
“Bonestripper,” written by Jack Blades, Tommy Shaw and Ted Nugent, produced by Ron Nevison, performed by Damn Yankees, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
“La Chanka,” written by Peter Aykroyd and Jose Pedro Beledo, produced by Peter Aykroyd, performed by Bertila Damas
“Atlantic City (Is A Party Town),” written by Peter Aykroyd, produced by Bruce Gowdy and Peter Aykroyd, performed by Elwood Blues Revue
“Tie The Knot,” written and produced by Greg Jacobs, performed by digital underground, courtesy of TNT/Tommy Boy Records
“Get Over,” written by Madonna and Stephen Bray, produced by Madonna and Shep Pettibone, performed by Nick Scotti, courtesy of Sire/Warner Bros. Records Inc.
“Big Girls Don’t Cry,” written by Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio, performed by Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, courtesy of Bob Gaudio and Frankie Valli d/b/a The Four Seasons Partnership
“I Mean I Love You,” written and performed by Hank Williams, Jr., courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Garden In The Rain,” written by Carrol Gibbons and James Dyrenforth, performed by Blue Barron, courtesy of Hindsight Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“She’s A Great, Great Girl,” written by Harry Woods, performed by Jack Teagarden, courtesy of RCA/Bluebird Records
“Wabash Cannonball,” written by A. P. Carter, performed by Doc Watson, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc. by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
“Helen Claire,” written and performed by Michael Kamen, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Git
Valkenvania
Release Date:
15 February 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 February 1991
Production Date:
began 7 May 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 April 1991
Copyright Number:
PA517333
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
93
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30955
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, wealthy businessman Chris Thorne meets lawyer Diane Lightson in an elevator. Chris invites the woman, who is visibly upset, to a party in his penthouse apartment. There, the two professionals realize they share an interest in a land development deal. Although Chris thinks the project is a fraud, Diane convinces him to drive her to a meeting with the client. Two rich Brazilians, Fausto and Renalda, overhear Chris and Diane making plans to leave Manhattan. Thinking the road trip is recreational, they invite themselves along. The next day, while driving down the New Jersey turnpike, the Brazillians insist on taking a more scenic route. Chris dismisses the idea, but Diane suggests a road not too far off the highway. A short while later, they drive through an impoverished town in a sleek BMW, while locals eye them with suspicion. When Chris rolls through a stop sign without hesitation, a police cruiser follows the car out of town. The cruiser signals for Chris to pull over, but Fausto and Renalda urge the businessman to speed away. The police cruiser, outfitted with an unusual array of switches, keeps pace with the BMW. Unexpected roadblocks force Chris to pull over, and Chief Constable Dennis Valkenheiser informs the New Yorker that only “the J. P.” can decide the foursome’s fate. Dennis escorts the BMW through the “Village and Shire of Valkenvania,” where strange metal sculptures and piles of old junk litter the roadside. Town Hall is a decrepit mansion, and the New Yorkers approach the Justice of the Peace with trepidation, stunned when the liver-spotted Hon. Reeve Alvin Valkenheiser sentences them to a hearing the following day. The crazy ... +


In New York City, wealthy businessman Chris Thorne meets lawyer Diane Lightson in an elevator. Chris invites the woman, who is visibly upset, to a party in his penthouse apartment. There, the two professionals realize they share an interest in a land development deal. Although Chris thinks the project is a fraud, Diane convinces him to drive her to a meeting with the client. Two rich Brazilians, Fausto and Renalda, overhear Chris and Diane making plans to leave Manhattan. Thinking the road trip is recreational, they invite themselves along. The next day, while driving down the New Jersey turnpike, the Brazillians insist on taking a more scenic route. Chris dismisses the idea, but Diane suggests a road not too far off the highway. A short while later, they drive through an impoverished town in a sleek BMW, while locals eye them with suspicion. When Chris rolls through a stop sign without hesitation, a police cruiser follows the car out of town. The cruiser signals for Chris to pull over, but Fausto and Renalda urge the businessman to speed away. The police cruiser, outfitted with an unusual array of switches, keeps pace with the BMW. Unexpected roadblocks force Chris to pull over, and Chief Constable Dennis Valkenheiser informs the New Yorker that only “the J. P.” can decide the foursome’s fate. Dennis escorts the BMW through the “Village and Shire of Valkenvania,” where strange metal sculptures and piles of old junk litter the roadside. Town Hall is a decrepit mansion, and the New Yorkers approach the Justice of the Peace with trepidation, stunned when the liver-spotted Hon. Reeve Alvin Valkenheiser sentences them to a hearing the following day. The crazy “J. P.” laughs as he sends the foursome through a trap door into the basement, confining them to his “trick house” for the night. Later, another group of city people get brought in for speeding, but this time, the eccentric judge shows no mercy. He flips a switch, and a mechanical apparatus whirs to life, transporting the offenders to the “Bonestripper,” a modified carnival attraction that spews out their skeletons. That night, Chris, Diane, Fausto, and Renalda are invited to supper with Dennis Valkenheiser, the J. P., and the J. P.’s granddaughter, Eldona, an obese woman who smiles flirtatiously at Chris Thorne. The Valkenheisers serve their guests Hawaiian punch, celery sticks, and hot dogs. Disgusted by the meal, Fausto leaps from his chair and announces that he and Renalda must leave the house. They jump through a window and run from the mansion. Braving filth and contamination, they swim across a small body of water to freedom. However, Constable Dennis intercepts the Brazillians. He listens thoughtfully to their offer of bribe money, relaxation, and fish tacos. Back inside the house, Chris and Diane take advantage of the commotion and flee the dining room, but the J. P. stops them with one of his mechanical contraptions. Eldona escorts the New Yorkers to their room, where they fall asleep. When they awaken, they notice the door is ajar. They again attempt to escape, but are thwarted at every turn by an array of moving walls and mechanized devices. They find their way to the attic, where they discover old newspaper clippings and hundreds of photographic identifications. Diane concludes that the Valkenheiser family has been administering its peculiar form of “justice” since the 1890s. Just then, a passageway opens, leading out of the attic by a funhouse slide. Lacking alternatives, Chris and Diane descend from the attic, but the slide forks in opposite directions, and the two are separated. Chris becomes trapped in the wall adjacent to the J. P.’s room, while Diane emerges outside the house in a scrap metal yard. She locates the BMW, which has been stripped to the frame. Hearing voices nearby, she creeps through the scrap yard until she comes upon two, fat, diaper-clad creatures forging metal. Shocked, she steps backward into a junk pile, alerting the creatures to her presence. A chase ensues, but Eldona thwarts Diane’s escape. The two creatures, Bobo and L’il Debbull, beg Eldona to leave the beautiful woman as their plaything. Back inside the mansion, the J. P. receives a telephone call informing him that a new group of perpetrators have been brought to court. When the judge leaves his bedroom, Chris crawls through a hole in the wall. However, the J. P. returns unexpectedly and threatens Chris with a knife. The businessman runs into the hall, where he collides with Eldona. The J. P. informs Chris of an arcane rule: Any person who touches Eldona must marry her. Pleased with himself, the judge returns to the courtroom, where a group of hip-hop artists await their hearing. The eccentric J. P. asks to see their musical instruments. The rappers perform a song in the courtroom, and the J. P. agrees to let them go without a fine. The judge then offers Chris a deal: death, or marry Eldona and live in Valkenvania forever. Chris reluctantly chooses to marry Eldona, but at the end of the ceremony, he has a change of heart and tries to get away. The angry judge sends Chris to the Bonestripper, but the contraption breaks down, and Chris survives unscathed. Out in the scrap yard, the J. P. threatens to kill Diane unless Chris surrenders. Chris causes an explosion, distracting the Valkenheiser family and rescuing Diane. Together they run from the property and jump onto a passing train. Back in New York City, they inform police about the Valkenheisers’ criminal activities, but are told the criminal family can only be arrested within town limits of Valkenvania. Chris and Diane unwittingly return to Valkenvania, where police reveal their allegiance to the J. P. Just then, the ground trembles as a coalmine fire erupts underground. Chris and Diane escape in the BMW as the mansion and village are engulfed in flames. Sometime later, Chris watches a news report on the Valkenvania fire, and becomes horrified when the J. P. tells a reporter his plan to move in with his “grandson-in-law” in New York City. Meanwhile, Fausto and Renalda, who have employed Dennis as their personal security detail, enjoy cocktails in Rio de Janeiro. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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