Pastime (1991)

PG | 94 mins | Drama | 23 August 1991

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HISTORY

Screenwriter David M. Eyre, Jr. is credited as “D. M. Eyre, Jr.” in onscreen credits.
       From spring 1989 to summer 1991, various contemporary sources referred to the film by its working title, One Cup of Coffee. On 2 Aug 1991, HR announced that distributor Miramax had changed the title to Pastime. A “cup of coffee” is a phrase used by baseball enthusiasts to describe a minor league player’s brief stint in the major leagues. Miramax felt the reference too obscure for mainstream audiences.
       In a 12 Nov 1989 NYT article, director Robin B. Armstrong recounted the process of making his first feature film. He purchased the rights to David M. Eyre, Jr.’s script, One Cup of Coffee, in Jan 1988. Eyre had written the story about a minor-league baseball player in the early 1970s, but never sought development for what he considered to be a “sample” script. Hoping to make the picture for less than $5 million, Armstrong spent an entire year securing funding from private investors. In early 1989, he selected a cast and locations, and polished the script. Principal photography began 14 Jun 1989 in Los Angeles, according to an 18 Apr 1989 HR production chart. In a 15 Aug 1989 L.B. Press Telegram article, filmmakers thanked residents of Long Beach, CA, for allowing the production team to “dress” residences on Fifth Street and Chestnut Street, where exterior scenes were shot on 22 and 23 Jul 1989. Filming wrapped on 27 Jul 1989. Over a year later, a 16 Nov 1990 DV news brief announced that Miramax Films had acquired the ... More Less

Screenwriter David M. Eyre, Jr. is credited as “D. M. Eyre, Jr.” in onscreen credits.
       From spring 1989 to summer 1991, various contemporary sources referred to the film by its working title, One Cup of Coffee. On 2 Aug 1991, HR announced that distributor Miramax had changed the title to Pastime. A “cup of coffee” is a phrase used by baseball enthusiasts to describe a minor league player’s brief stint in the major leagues. Miramax felt the reference too obscure for mainstream audiences.
       In a 12 Nov 1989 NYT article, director Robin B. Armstrong recounted the process of making his first feature film. He purchased the rights to David M. Eyre, Jr.’s script, One Cup of Coffee, in Jan 1988. Eyre had written the story about a minor-league baseball player in the early 1970s, but never sought development for what he considered to be a “sample” script. Hoping to make the picture for less than $5 million, Armstrong spent an entire year securing funding from private investors. In early 1989, he selected a cast and locations, and polished the script. Principal photography began 14 Jun 1989 in Los Angeles, according to an 18 Apr 1989 HR production chart. In a 15 Aug 1989 L.B. Press Telegram article, filmmakers thanked residents of Long Beach, CA, for allowing the production team to “dress” residences on Fifth Street and Chestnut Street, where exterior scenes were shot on 22 and 23 Jul 1989. Filming wrapped on 27 Jul 1989. Over a year later, a 16 Nov 1990 DV news brief announced that Miramax Films had acquired the rights to One Cup of Coffee, with plans for a spring 1991 release.
       One Cup of Coffee screened at the Sundance Film Festival on 22 Jan 1991, winning the “Audience Award” in the dramatic feature category. Over six months later, various HR news briefs indicated that the renamed film would receive wide theatrical release on 23 Aug 1991. Reviews that day were mixed, with the LAT describing Pastime as a “surprisingly good little film,” and the NYT panning the sentimental baseball tale as clichéd.
       End credits conclude with the following acknowledgment: “The Major League Baseball trademarks depicted in this motion picture were licensed by Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Nov 1990.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jan 1991
p. 14, 30.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jan 1991
p. 9, 38.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 1991
p. 4, 50.
Long Beach Press Telegram
15 Aug 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Aug 1991
Calendar, p. 8.
New York Times
12 Nov 1989.
---
New York Times
23 Aug 1991
Section C, p. 13.
Variety
4 Feb 1991
p. 89.
Variety
12 Aug 1991.
---
Village Voice
27 Aug 1991
p. 75.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Bullpen, Ltd.
In association with Open Road Productions presents
An Armstrong/ Young production
A Robin B. Armstrong film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3rd asst dir
Asst prod mgr
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
B cam 1st asst
B cam 2d asst
Prod still photog
Dir of photog, Addl photog
1st asst cam, Addl photog
Gaffer, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
Lighting and grip equip
Dollies and cranes
Dollies and cranes
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept coord
Art dept asst
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Assoc film ed
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
Asst negative cutter
Ed facilities
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Set dresser
On set dresser
Const coord
Prop master
Prop asst
Swing, Addl photog
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward asst
MUSIC
Asst mus ed
Orch contractor
Mus rec by
Mus rec and mixed at
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Sd mixer, Addl photog
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
Sd FX rec
Sd FX coord
Sd FX coord
Addl re-rec
Supv re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Dolby stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup/Hair styles des
Asst makeup/Hair
Addl makeup
Addl hair
Addl hair
Addl hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod exec
Prod coord
Scr supv
Asst scr supv
Loc scout
Baseball tech adv, pitching
Baseball tech adv, on field
Unit pub
Asst prod coord
Scr consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech field adv
Tech field adv
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Period vehicles
Period vehicles
Period vehicles
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Catering
Catering asst
Catering asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Armstrong
Intern
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," sung by Jubilant Sykes.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
One Cup of Coffee
Release Date:
23 August 1991
Premiere Information:
Sundance Film Festival screening: 22 January 1991
Los Angeles and New York openings: 23 August 1991
Production Date:
14 June--27 July 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Bullpen, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
9 July 1990
Copyright Number:
PAu001373948
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Sound
Re-recorded in a THX sound system theatre
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
94
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In 1957 Central California, 41-year-old baseball player Roy Dean Bream jogs from his house to the nearby ballpark, where Tyrone Debray, an African American pitcher, is auditioning for the Tri City “Steamers.” Roy Dean admires the newcomer’s strong arm. At the game that night, team owner Peter Laporte laments the sparse attendance, and expresses frustration at seeing the aging Roy Dean on the field. He admonishes team manager Clyde Bigby to get the team back on a winning streak. Near the dugout, Roy Dean corrects Randy Keever’s pitching technique, amusing the other young players with his earnest instructions. Although the Steamers make a few good plays, they lose the game. Afterward, Peter Laporte calls Clyde Bigby into his office and suggests that Roy Dean would be better off coaching than being a relief pitcher. Clyde stands up for the veteran player, before changing the subject and announcing his intention to start Tyrone Debray in the next game. Looking for a “star” to draw crowds to the ballpark, Peter Laporte approves. Meanwhile, in the locker room, Roy Dean invites the players to have a beer with him. No one is interested, so he goes to a bar alone. There, he assists a drunken patron, irritating two hotheaded pool players who interpret his kindness as meddling. One man hits Roy Dean, causing him to fall against the pool table and cut his forehead. Bartender Inez Brice rushes to his aid, but he tells her not to worry. Leaving the bar, Roy Dean runs into Tyrone Debray, and is shocked when he learns the talented pitcher is only seventeen years old. Roy Dean regales Tyrone with the story of his appearance in ... +


In 1957 Central California, 41-year-old baseball player Roy Dean Bream jogs from his house to the nearby ballpark, where Tyrone Debray, an African American pitcher, is auditioning for the Tri City “Steamers.” Roy Dean admires the newcomer’s strong arm. At the game that night, team owner Peter Laporte laments the sparse attendance, and expresses frustration at seeing the aging Roy Dean on the field. He admonishes team manager Clyde Bigby to get the team back on a winning streak. Near the dugout, Roy Dean corrects Randy Keever’s pitching technique, amusing the other young players with his earnest instructions. Although the Steamers make a few good plays, they lose the game. Afterward, Peter Laporte calls Clyde Bigby into his office and suggests that Roy Dean would be better off coaching than being a relief pitcher. Clyde stands up for the veteran player, before changing the subject and announcing his intention to start Tyrone Debray in the next game. Looking for a “star” to draw crowds to the ballpark, Peter Laporte approves. Meanwhile, in the locker room, Roy Dean invites the players to have a beer with him. No one is interested, so he goes to a bar alone. There, he assists a drunken patron, irritating two hotheaded pool players who interpret his kindness as meddling. One man hits Roy Dean, causing him to fall against the pool table and cut his forehead. Bartender Inez Brice rushes to his aid, but he tells her not to worry. Leaving the bar, Roy Dean runs into Tyrone Debray, and is shocked when he learns the talented pitcher is only seventeen years old. Roy Dean regales Tyrone with the story of his appearance in a major league baseball game against the St. Louis Cardinals. Brought up from the minor leagues to pitch for the Chicago Cubs, he was having a great game, until the Cardinals’ Stan Musial knocked a fastball out of the park, scoring four runs and ending Roy Dean’s chance for a big league career. The good-natured Roy Dean shrugs and claims to have no regrets. Being in the game and doing your best is what truly matters. When he confides his dream of breaking “old man” Jack Quinn’s record for the number of lifetime ballgame appearances, Tyrone notes that Roy Dean could easily surpass his hero this season. Tyrone asks Roy Dean what he plans to do after retiring, and the veteran talks about improving his training regimen and continuing to play. The next morning, Roy Dean and Tyrone stop at a diner, where the other Steamers make racist remarks about their new teammate. However, Roy Dean advises Tyrone to pay no attention. Later, the two pitchers practice together, and Roy Dean encourages Tyrone to develop a signature throw. He shows the rookie the “Bream Dream,” a deceptive curving pitch that never fails to strike out a batter. A few days later, the Steamers travel by bus to play against the “Bombers,” whose underhanded playing style leads to batters being hit by pitches. A fight ensues, and Tyrone gets thrown out of the game, leaving Randy Keever to pitch. After several innings, Roy Dean steps in to relieve Keever. However, the veteran loses control of his signature pitch, and the Steamers lose. Exasperated, Peter Laporte instructs Clyde to let Roy Dean go. Sometime later, Tyrone notices Roy Dean lost in thought. Roy Dean admits he was thinking about a woman, and abruptly leaves. He returns to the bar and invites Inez to the team party. Laughing at his shyness, she accepts. The next night at the party, Randy Keever comments on Roy Dean’s impending retirement, stunning the veteran, who had not yet been informed of the news. On leaving the party, Roy Dean tells Peter Laporte of his plans to quit the team and pursue a new opportunity. Inez tries to make light of the situation, inviting Tyrone and Roy Dean to have a drink at her house, but Roy Dean would rather be alone. With tears in his eyes, he goes to the ballpark, dons his uniform, and carries a bag of baseballs to the pitcher’s mound. Imagining the roar of the crowd, he throws pitch after pitch at a target on the backstop. Meanwhile, Tyrone searches the town, concerned for his friend. He notices the bright ballpark lights, and upon entering, finds Roy Dean collapsed on the pitcher’s mound, dead from a heart attack. After Roy Dean’s funeral, Inez consoles Tyrone, wishing him luck in his professional career. In the second inning of an afternoon game, Clyde Bidgby puts Tyrone in to pitch, upsetting Randy Keever, who makes a rude comment about the deceased Roy Dean. A fight ensues, resulting in Keever’s dismissal from the team. Tyrone takes the mound, and with tow shakes of his head, prepares to throw Roy Dean’s signature pitch, the “Bream Dream.” A few years later, Tyrone pitches for the Chicago White Sox. As the packed stadium cheers, he shakes his head twice and leans forward, eyeing the batter with fierce intensity. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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