The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! (1988)

PG-13 | 84-85 or 89 mins | Comedy | 2 December 1988

Producer:

Robert K. Weiss

Cinematographer:

Robert Stevens

Editor:

Michael Jablow

Production Designer:

John J. Lloyd

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Actor Ron Tank’s complete character name was too long to fit into the database field for Cast members. The character name is credited onscreen as: “Mayor, will there be any additional security officers added to the police force during the Queen’s visit?” The credit “In Case of Tornado” is credited onscreen to “Southwest Corner Of Basement.”
       The film is based on the 1982 television series, Police Squad!, created by writers Jerry Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and David Zucker as a parody of 1950s and 1960s television police dramas. The 28 Feb 1982 NYT reported that the series was ordered by the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) for “a limited run” of six episodes. The program premiered on 4 Mar 1982, as noted by the NYT review of the same day. Although an article in the 7 Oct 1987 Var reported Police Squad! was canceled by ABC after six episodes, production notes in AMPAS library files noted David Zucker saying only four episodes were aired. Items in the 15 Apr 1982 DV and 20 Apr 1982 HR reported that after the series cancellation, Paramount Pictures would release a film version of the series in Europe by incorporating four episodes of the series, with some new material. Four years later, a 15 Dec 1986 DV item reported that Jerry Zucker, Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, and writer Pat Proft were writing a script inspired by Police Squad! as a feature film for release summer 1988. An article in the 2 Dec 1988 LAT revealed that ... More Less

Actor Ron Tank’s complete character name was too long to fit into the database field for Cast members. The character name is credited onscreen as: “Mayor, will there be any additional security officers added to the police force during the Queen’s visit?” The credit “In Case of Tornado” is credited onscreen to “Southwest Corner Of Basement.”
       The film is based on the 1982 television series, Police Squad!, created by writers Jerry Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and David Zucker as a parody of 1950s and 1960s television police dramas. The 28 Feb 1982 NYT reported that the series was ordered by the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) for “a limited run” of six episodes. The program premiered on 4 Mar 1982, as noted by the NYT review of the same day. Although an article in the 7 Oct 1987 Var reported Police Squad! was canceled by ABC after six episodes, production notes in AMPAS library files noted David Zucker saying only four episodes were aired. Items in the 15 Apr 1982 DV and 20 Apr 1982 HR reported that after the series cancellation, Paramount Pictures would release a film version of the series in Europe by incorporating four episodes of the series, with some new material. Four years later, a 15 Dec 1986 DV item reported that Jerry Zucker, Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, and writer Pat Proft were writing a script inspired by Police Squad! as a feature film for release summer 1988. An article in the 2 Dec 1988 LAT revealed that the picture’s working title was Police Squad, but David Zucker reported that Paramount Pictures was concerned that audiences might confuse the film for a sixth entry in the Police Academy series. Referring to the title, The Naked Gun, reports varied on the film’s shooting schedule: the 1 Mar 1988 HR production chart noted principal photography began on 16 Feb 1988, while the 2 Mar 1988 Var production chart stated filming started on 22 Feb 1988. As noted in production charts, filming took place on locations in Los Angeles, CA, including Dodger Stadium, as reported in a 25 Apr 1988 DV item. Actors Leslie Nielson and Ed Williams reprised their roles from the television series. An 11 May 1988 DV brief announced that principal photography was completed and release was scheduled for the 1988 Christmas season. According to the 25 Apr 1988 DV and the 21 Dec 1988 NYT, the picture’s budget was approximately $14.5 million.
       A 7 Jul 1988 Exhibitor Relations Co., Inc. press release in AMPAS library files listed actor John Houseman as part of the cast. However, Houseman is not credited onscreen.
       Reports in the 24 Oct 1988 HR and 26 Oct 1988 Var noted that the picture’s release date would be 16 Dec 1988. However, a 23 Nov 1988 Paramount Pictures news release in AMPAS library files announced the film would open earlier on 2 Dec 1988 nationwide. According to the 28 Nov 1988 HR and the 30 Nov 1988 Var review, the picture was screened for media and press on 22 Nov 1988 at the Mann Bruin Theatre in Westwood, CA.
       The picture was released on 2 Dec 1988 as planned. The following week, the 6 Dec 1988 LAT reported the film was first place at the box-office during its opening weekend, and a trade advertisement in the 7 Dec 1988 DV stated that the film took in $9,331,746 in three days of release at 1,576 theaters.
       Although there is a 1988 copyright notice on the film, copyright was formally registered on 9 Jan 1989.
       A 16 Apr 1992 HR news item reported that on 13 Apr 1992, the law firm of Myman, Abell, Fineman & Greenspan, as “the successor-in-interest to Shagin & Myman,” law firm filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court against Jerry Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and David Zucker, claiming that percentages were not paid to Shagin & Myman from the film, its 1991 sequel, The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear (see entry), and the 1984 film Top Secret (see entry). The disposition of the suit has not been determined.
       At the time this record was written, there have been two sequels to the film: The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear (1991, see entry) and Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult (1994, see entry). On 13 Dec 2013, Var announced that Paramount Pictures was planning to produce The Naked Gun “reboot” with actor Ed Helms as “Frank Drebin.” Screenwriting team Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant were hired to write the script. However, at the time of writing this record in Aug 2015, the picture was still in development.
       End credits state: “The Producers wish to thank the following for their cooperation in the production of this film: USC Trojan Marching Band; The California Angels; The Seattle Mariners; Major League Baseball; Tripoli Rocketry Association; The Alamo Society.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Apr 1982
p. 4.
Daily Variety
15 Dec 1986
p. 3.
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1988
p. 22, 26.
Daily Variety
25 Apr 1988
p. 3.
Daily Variety
11 May 1988
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Dec 1988
pp. 12-13.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 1982.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Nov 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Nov 1988
p. 7, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
2 Dec 1988
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
2 Dec 1988
Calendar, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
6 Dec 1988
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
28 Feb 1982
Section A, p. 3.
New York Times
4 Mar 1982
Section C, p. 23.
New York Times
2 Dec 1988
2 Dec 1988
New York Times
21 Dec 1988
Section C, p. 22.
Variety
7 Oct 1987
p. 4.
Variety
2 Mar 1988
p. 8.
Variety
26 Oct 1988
p. 24.
Variety
30 Nov 1988
p. 12.
Variety
13 Dec 2013.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
People Who Acted In The Movie:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures presents
a Zucker Abrahams Zucker production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Dir, 2d unit crew
Dir, 2d unit crew
1st asst dir, 2d unit crew
1st asst dir, 2d unit crew
1st asst dir, 2d unit crew
2d asst dir, 2d unit crew
2d asst dir, 2d unit crew
2d 2d asst dir, 2d unit crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Video eng
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
1st company grip
Dolly grip
Dir of photog, 2d unit crew
Dir of photog, 2d unit crew
Cam op, 2d unit crew
Cam op, 2d unit crew
Cam op, 2d unit crew
1st asst photog, 2d unit crew
2d asst photog, 2d unit crew
1st company grip, 2d unit crew
2d company grip, 2d unit crew
Chief lighting tech, 2d unit crew
B-cam 1st asst
Rigging gaffer
2d grip
Lamp op
Lamp op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Lead person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Set painter
Paint setter
Const coord
Prop master, 2d unit crew
Const foreman
Const foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men`s cost supv
Women`s cost supv
Costumer
Costumer, 2d unit crew
MUSIC
Mus scoring mixer
Orchestrator
Orchestrator
Orchestrator
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd mixer
Cable person
Playback op
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Supv A.D.R. ed
A.D.R. ed
Foley ed
Foley sd spec eff
Foley sd spec eff
Foley mixer
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Matte paintings
Matte painter
Spec eff supv
Main title des
Spec eff tech
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist, 2d unit crew
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod office coord
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. Weiss
Secy to Mr. Weiss
Mr. Weiss' ward
Mr. Weiss' divorce attorney
Asst to the exec prod
Loc mgr
Unit pub
Prod auditor
Asst prod auditor
Office asst
Craft services
Prod medic
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Extras casting by
Scr supv, 2d unit crew
Prod consultant
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Animal handler
Tech adv
Prod asst
Accounting office asst
Office asst
Office asst
Intern
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the television series Police Squad by Jerry Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and David Zucker (ABC, 1982).
SONGS
“I Love L.A.,” written and performed by Randy Newman, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“I’m Into Something Good,” by Gerry Goffin and Carole King, performed by Peter Noone
“Louie Louie,” by Richard Berry, performed by Rice University Marching Owl Band, courtesy of Rhino Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
“I Love L.A.,” written and performed by Randy Newman, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“I’m Into Something Good,” by Gerry Goffin and Carole King, performed by Peter Noone
“Louie Louie,” by Richard Berry, performed by Rice University Marching Owl Band, courtesy of Rhino Records, Inc.
“Trumpet Fanfare,” by Stephen Oliver.
+
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
The Naked Gun: From the Files of 'Police Squad!'
The Naked Gun
Police Squad
Release Date:
2 December 1988
Premiere Information:
Screening at Mann's Bruin Theatre in Westwood, CA: 22 November 1988
Nationwide opening: 2 December 1988
Production Date:
Mid-February--mid May 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
9 January 1989
Copyright Number:
PA0000395413
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
84-85 or 89
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29154
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, Officer Nordberg of Police Squad, a special division of the police department, boards a boat named the I Luv You in Los Angeles Harbor while he investigates heroin being smuggled from South America. Nordberg overhears that the final shipment will arrive in three days. Suddenly, Vincent Ludwig, a well-known and respected city businessman, finds Nordberg and orders his henchmen to kill him. After being shot, Nordberg tumbles overboard. Though saved by a night watchman, Nordberg goes into a coma. Later, Police Squad Lieutenant Frank Drebin is updated on Nordberg’s condition by his captain, Ed Hocken. At the hospital, Nordberg regains consciousness and tries to tell Frank about Ludwig’s connection to the smuggled heroin, but Frank misunderstands him and accidentally knocks him back into a coma. When Franks asks Nordberg’s wife, Wilma, if he told her about his undercover assignment, she gives him a photograph of the boat, I Luv You. Frank requests that Police Squad investigate the attack on Nordberg, but Ed tells him the squad has been assigned as security for Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain on her upcoming visit to Los Angeles. At the harbor, Frank learns that Nordberg was employed by Vincent Ludwig, and rumored to be dealing drugs. Unconvinced his friend could be a drug dealer, Frank arrives at Ludwig’s office to question him. Wanting to appear helpful, Ludwig lets Frank review his employment records with the help of his assistant, Jane Spencer. Instantly attracted to Jane, Frank asks her out to ... +


In Los Angeles, California, Officer Nordberg of Police Squad, a special division of the police department, boards a boat named the I Luv You in Los Angeles Harbor while he investigates heroin being smuggled from South America. Nordberg overhears that the final shipment will arrive in three days. Suddenly, Vincent Ludwig, a well-known and respected city businessman, finds Nordberg and orders his henchmen to kill him. After being shot, Nordberg tumbles overboard. Though saved by a night watchman, Nordberg goes into a coma. Later, Police Squad Lieutenant Frank Drebin is updated on Nordberg’s condition by his captain, Ed Hocken. At the hospital, Nordberg regains consciousness and tries to tell Frank about Ludwig’s connection to the smuggled heroin, but Frank misunderstands him and accidentally knocks him back into a coma. When Franks asks Nordberg’s wife, Wilma, if he told her about his undercover assignment, she gives him a photograph of the boat, I Luv You. Frank requests that Police Squad investigate the attack on Nordberg, but Ed tells him the squad has been assigned as security for Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain on her upcoming visit to Los Angeles. At the harbor, Frank learns that Nordberg was employed by Vincent Ludwig, and rumored to be dealing drugs. Unconvinced his friend could be a drug dealer, Frank arrives at Ludwig’s office to question him. Wanting to appear helpful, Ludwig lets Frank review his employment records with the help of his assistant, Jane Spencer. Instantly attracted to Jane, Frank asks her out to dinner. However, Jane declines. After Frank leaves, Ludwig asks Jane to spy on Frank. At the police station laboratory, Frank and Ed Hocken meet scientist Ted Olsen. After Ted gives Frank the lab’s newest device, cufflinks that fire temporary immobilization darts, he informs the men that fibers from Nordberg’s jacket contained heroin. Frank insists Nordberg was framed, and Ed tells him he only has twenty-hour hours to clear Nordberg’s name. Later, Ludwig meets with Pahpshmir, a representative of a group plotting to assassinate Queen Elizabeth. When Ludwig agrees to do the job for $20 million, Pahpshmir asks how it will be done. Ludwig is able to control people by sensory induced hypnosis. To demonstrate, he uses a remote control that triggers a signal on the watch of his secretary, Dominique. After Ludwig turns the device off, Dominique has no memory of being controlled. Impressed, Pahpshmir agrees to pay Ludwig’s price. Later, Ludwig sends one of his henchmen to the hospital to hypnotize Nordberg’s doctor into killing the policeman. However, Frank arrives and stops him. As the doctor steals a car to get away, Frank orders a teenage student driver to follow, but the doctor dies after crashing into a gasoline truck, a missile, and a firework’s store. In the evening, Frank goes to his apartment and finds Jane Spencer. Over dinner, Frank shows her the photograph of the I LuvYou, but she does not recognize it as belonging to Ludwig. Afterward, Jane kisses Frank and they make love. The next day, Jane and Frank enjoy their newfound love until Frank leaves to stake out Ludwig’s office. Breaking in, Frank finds a note from Pahpshmir regarding his deal with Ludwig to assassinate Queen Elizabeth. However, Frank inadvertently sets the note and the office on fire. In the morning, the mayor reprimands Frank, who insists he found evidence that Ludwig was hired to kill the Queen. Not convinced, the mayor orders Frank not to attend the Queen’s welcoming reception at the Ambassador Hotel. Later, Jane tells Frank that Ludwig wants to meet him at the stockyards of the Ludwig Meat Packing Company. Frank reluctantly agrees. He arrives at the stockyard, but is ambushed by one of Ludwig’s henchmen. Frank kills the henchman by pushing him into a vat of toxic waste. Frank goes to the reception and tells Ed Hocken about a possible assassination attempt. Seeing Jane dining with Ludwig, Frank thinks she was involved in the set-up. However, Jane insists she was not. As the mayor and Ludwig welcome Queen Elizabeth with the gift of a vintage war musket, Frank believes Ludwig is aiming at her. He jumps on top of the Queen, embarrassing the police and the mayor. The following day, the mayor orders that Frank to be fired from Police Squad. As Frank cleans out his desk, Jane arrives and tells him she overheard Ludwig saying that while the Queen attends the California Angels and Seattle Mariners baseball game, one of the players will kill her in the seventh inning. At the baseball stadium, Jane, Ludwig and the mayor accompany the Queen to special box seats next to the field, while the squad covers all exits. Wanting to find a way onto the field, Frank pretends to be world-renowned opera singer Enrico Pallazzo, invited to sing the National Anthem. However, Ludwig recognizes Frank and orders nearby officers to arrest him. To hide, Frank knocks the home plate umpire unconscious and disguises himself again. During the game, Frank searches every player, but does not find any weapons. At the end of the sixth inning, Ludwig uses his remote control and signals Angels right fielder, Reggie Jackson. Hypnotized, Reggie finds a handgun under second base and walks towards the Queen. Jane yells to warn Frank, but Ludwig pulls a gun and leads her away from the field. Hearing Jane’s warning, Frank fires one of his dart cufflinks. However, he hits a woman in the bleachers. Temporarily paralyzed, she falls directly on Reggie Jackson, saving the Queen’s life. Frank follows Ludwig and Jane to the stadium concourse. Jane escapes by biting Ludwig, and Frank fires his second cufflink dart. Falling over the railing onto the parking lot asphalt, Ludwig is killed as a truck, a steamroller and a marching band flatten him. A band member steps on Ludwig’s remote control, and triggers a transmitter in Jane’s watch, activating her to kill Frank. As Jane aims a gun at him, Frank shows her an engagement ring and tells her he loves her. Hearing Frank’s declaration, Jane breaks free of the hypnotic control and agrees to marry him. Afterward, the mayor rehires Frank as a part of Police Squad. Nordberg arrives, awoken from his coma, and thanks Frank for clearing his name. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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