The New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking (1988)

G | 100 mins | Adventure, Children's works | 29 July 1988

Director:

Ken Annakin

Writer:

Ken Annakin

Cinematographer:

Roland "Ozzie" Smith

Editor:

Ken Zemke

Production Designer:

Jack Senter

Production Company:

Longstocking Productions
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HISTORY

End credits state: “The Producers Wish to Thank the Following for Their Kind Cooperation in the Making of This Film: Lennart Wiklund: The Svensk Filmindustri; Jeffrey Konvitz: Longstocking Production Counsel; John Dark: Representative of The Completion Bond Co.; Harold Hendry and The Crew of the Schooner, ‘Fenico’; Stephen Pitcairn and his Auto-Giro; Technical Advisor – George Townson; Mechanics – Joe Rommell and Punch Conover; Dale Eldridge and The Jacksonville Film Commission; Ken Cooksey and The Florida Film Commission; The Town of Fernandina Beach; Amelia Island Plantation; Romy and Alexandra Mehlman: whose love for ‘Pippi’ provided the inspiration for this film; and Most of All to Astrid Lingren, For bringing joy to children of all ages throughout the world.” End credits list: “Filmed on location in Northern Florida in Jacksonville and in the town of Fernandina Beach on Amelia Island.”
       The film is based on the books, featuring the character “Pippi Longstocking,” by Swedish author Astrid Lindgren. The first book, Pippi Långstrump, was published by Rabén & Sjögren, in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1945, followed by 1946’s Pippi Långstrump går ombord, and 1948’s Pippi Långstrump i Söderhavet. The books were translated into English, and published in the U.S. under the titles: Pippi Longstocking (Viking, New York, NY, 1950), Pippi Goes Aboard (Viking, New York, NY, 1957), and Pippi in the South Seas (Viking, New York, NY, 1959).
       The 15 Aug 1984 Var announced that producer Gary Mehlman had obtained the rights to make the first U.S. production of Pippi Longstocking. An article in the ... More Less

End credits state: “The Producers Wish to Thank the Following for Their Kind Cooperation in the Making of This Film: Lennart Wiklund: The Svensk Filmindustri; Jeffrey Konvitz: Longstocking Production Counsel; John Dark: Representative of The Completion Bond Co.; Harold Hendry and The Crew of the Schooner, ‘Fenico’; Stephen Pitcairn and his Auto-Giro; Technical Advisor – George Townson; Mechanics – Joe Rommell and Punch Conover; Dale Eldridge and The Jacksonville Film Commission; Ken Cooksey and The Florida Film Commission; The Town of Fernandina Beach; Amelia Island Plantation; Romy and Alexandra Mehlman: whose love for ‘Pippi’ provided the inspiration for this film; and Most of All to Astrid Lingren, For bringing joy to children of all ages throughout the world.” End credits list: “Filmed on location in Northern Florida in Jacksonville and in the town of Fernandina Beach on Amelia Island.”
       The film is based on the books, featuring the character “Pippi Longstocking,” by Swedish author Astrid Lindgren. The first book, Pippi Långstrump, was published by Rabén & Sjögren, in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1945, followed by 1946’s Pippi Långstrump går ombord, and 1948’s Pippi Långstrump i Söderhavet. The books were translated into English, and published in the U.S. under the titles: Pippi Longstocking (Viking, New York, NY, 1950), Pippi Goes Aboard (Viking, New York, NY, 1957), and Pippi in the South Seas (Viking, New York, NY, 1959).
       The 15 Aug 1984 Var announced that producer Gary Mehlman had obtained the rights to make the first U.S. production of Pippi Longstocking. An article in the 19 Jul 1985 LAT reported that since Nov 1983, Mehlman had been attempting to purchase the rights from Lindgren and Svensk Filmindustri, a Swedish film production and distribution company. However, during a trip to Stockholm, Sweden, to meet with Lindgren and Svensk Filmindustri, Mehlman’s daughters, Romy and Alexandra, met Lindgren and thanked her for creating the character of “Pippi.” Afterward, Lindgren and Svensk Filmindustri granted Mehlman the non-Scandinavian rights to make the film, referred to by the working title The Adventures of Pippi Longstocking, as a co-production with Svensk Filmindustri, and script-approval from Lindgren.
       According to the 6 Apr 1985 Screen International, principal photography was to begin in Sep 1985 with a budget of $5 million, and a target release date in spring 1986 in the U.S. and Sweden. However, the 19 Jul 1985 LAT noted that production was set to begin four months later, in Jan 1986, with release schedule set for the 1986 Thanksgiving holiday.
       The 15 Aug 1984 Var reported that screenwriter Kimi Peck was attached to write the script, but the following year, the 19 Jul 1985 LAT reported Paul Haggis would adapt Lindgren’s first book into a screenplay. However, the 16 Oct 1985 Var stated that the screenplay was written by director Ken Annakin. Neither Peck nor Haggis are credited onscreen.
       An announcement in the 7 Oct 1985 HR stated pre-production on The New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking had begun, and “a world-wide search for the girl to play ‘Pippi’” was underway. The 15 Oct 1985 DV reported the search for the film’s lead was to occur throughout Canada, England, and the United States. In addition, the picture’s budget was increased to between $10 million and $12 million, and locations were being scouted in northern Florida, North Carolina and Bavaria, Germany. The following month, a 15 Nov 1985 Daily News brief announced Amelia Island, FL, near the city of Jacksonville, was selected as the filming location.
       The 20 Feb 1986 HR reported that eleven-year-old Tami Erin Klicman from Florida was cast in the role of “Pippi,” and to be a spokesperson for the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Onscreen, Klicman is credited as “Tami Erin.”
       According to the 20 Feb 1986 HR, production was scheduled for a 31 Mar 1986 start in Florida, with anticipated release during the 1987 Easter holiday, but an item in the 13 Sep 1986 Screen International reported the picture ran into financing issues. Seven months later, the 8 Apr 1987 Var production chart noted principal photography began on 2 Apr 1987, while a 29 Jul 1988 HR article reported filming started on 18 May 1987. Locations included Jacksonville, FL, Fernandina Beach, FL, and Amelia Island, FL. Principal photography was announced as being completed in the 11 Sep 1987 HR. A 31 Mar 1988 Exhibitor Relations Co., Inc. press release in AMPAS library files, listed the film’s budget as $10 million, while writer-director Ken Annakin was reported in the 29 Jul 1988 HR and 8 Sep 1988 HR as stating the budget was approximately $8 million.
       A news item in the 4 Mar 1988 DV reported that the film’s world premiere, co-hosted by UNICEF, was planned for 8 Mar 1988 in Tokyo, Japan, to be attended by members of Japan’s Imperial Family. The U.S. premiere occurred on 15 Jul 1988 at the Florida Theater in Jacksonville, FL, a benefit for the University Hospital’s Pediatric Heart Program, as noted in the DV published the same day. In addition to the U.S. premiere, the 15 Jul 1988 DV reported that film’s distributor, Columbia Pictures, was holding screenings across the country as benefits for a number of children’s organizations: 2 – 3 Jul 1988 in Telluride, CO; 23 Jul 1988 in Burbank, CA, Washington, DC, and Charlotte, NC; 24 Jul 1988 in Westwood, CA, at the Wadsworth Theater, and in Miami, FL; and 25 Jul 1988 in Portland, ME. Materials in AMPAS library files also noted a “Benefit Bay Area Premiere” of the film on 25 Jul 1988 at the Pacific Film Archive in Berkeley, CA.
       As reported the 29 Jul 1988 HR, one thousand prints of the picture were released nationwide. While reviews were mixed, an interview with writer-director Ken Annakin in the 8 Sep 1988 HR reported that the film took in roughly $200,000 per day from 1 – 4 Aug 1988, but by 5 Aug 1988, “there was not one press ad[vertisement]” promoting the picture.
       Four years later, news items in the 17 Feb 1992 Var and 20 Feb 1992 HR reported executive producer Mishaal Kamal Adham filing a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court against Columbia, Coca-Cola Companypany, Columbia’s former parent company, studio executive and producer Dawn Steel and studio executive James Spitz for $5 million. Adham claimed the film’s release was “sabotaged.” The outcome of the suit has not been determined.
       Preceding the picture, a number of Swedish “Pippi Longstocking” film adaptations had been filmed by Svensk Filmindustri, including: Pippi Longstocking (1969); Pippi Goes on Board (1969); Pippi in the South Seas (1970); and Pippi on the Run (1970). A 1969 Swedish television series, Pippi Longstocking, aired for one season. A Canadian-German-Swedish animated film, titled Astrid Lindgren’s Pippi Longstocking, was released in 1997, followed by the animated television series, Pippi Longstocking, for two seasons. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily News
15 Nov 1985.
---
Daily Variety
15 Oct 1985
p. 1, 9.
Daily Variety
4 Mar 1988
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Jul 1988
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Feb 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Sep 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 1988
p. 3, 54.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jul 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1988.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Feb 1992
p. 4, 80.
Los Angeles Times
19 July 1985
Calendar, p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
29 Jul 1988
Calendar, p. 19.
New York Times
29 Jul 1988
Section C, p. 11.
Screen International
6 Apr 1985.
---
Screen International
13 Sep 1986.
---
Variety
15 Aug 1984
p. 5.
Variety
16 Oct 1985
p. 414.
Variety
8 Apr 1987
p. 8.
Variety
27 Jul 1988
p. 17.
Variety
17 Feb 1992
p. 95.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures presents
an Adham/Moshay/Mehlman Production of
a Ken Annakin Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Rigging grip
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Prod illustrator
Primary visual consultant
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutting
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Paint coord
Set coord
Leadman
Standby painter
Prop master
Asst prop master
Set & loc const
Set & loc const
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Costumer
Asst costumer
MUSIC
Orig score by
Songs by
Songs by
Synthesizer eff by
Mus mixer
Mus mixer, CTS Studios, U.K.
Score rec at
Score rec at Mafilm Studios with the
Addl background vocals
Addl background vocals
Addl background vocals
Addl background vocals
SOUND
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Foley ed
A.D.R. ed
A.D.R. mixer
A.D.R. mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec at
VISUAL EFFECTS
Chief des
Crew
Spec eff shop
Spec eff shop
Spec opt eff
Title des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Makeup artist
Asst makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Exec vice president marketing and prod for Longsto
Exec asst to Mr. Annakin/Loc mgr
Loc auditor
Asst auditor
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to the prods
Asst loc mgr
Animals provided by
Trainer
Animal eff
Animal eff
Extra casting
Prod trainee
Prod secy
Catering
Vehicles supplied by
Transport coord
Picture cars' coord
Transportation capt
Craft services
Studio facilities
Promotional consultants
Licensing representatives
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the classic books by Astrid Lindgren.
SONGS
“Pippi Longstocking (Is Coming Into Your Town),” performed by Margie Nelson and The International Children’s Choir, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale
“We Live On The Seas,” performed by Michael Mendelsohn, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale
“Scrubbing Day,” performed by Marlene Ricci, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale
+
SONGS
“Pippi Longstocking (Is Coming Into Your Town),” performed by Margie Nelson and The International Children’s Choir, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale
“We Live On The Seas,” performed by Michael Mendelsohn, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale
“Scrubbing Day,” performed by Marlene Ricci, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale
“Runnin’ Away,” performed by Margie Nelson, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale
“Merry Christmas Tree,” performed by Gail Lopata Lennon, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale
“Sticky Situation,” performed by Sandra Simmons, produced and arranged by Misha Segal and Pat Caddick, recorded and mixed by Michael Carnevale.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Adventures of Pippi Longstocking
Release Date:
29 July 1988
Premiere Information:
World premiere, Tokyo, Japan: 8 March 1988
U.S. premiere, Jacksonville, FL: 15 July 1988
Nationwide release: 29 July 1988
Production Date:
began mid 1987
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures, a division of Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
16 June 1988
Copyright Number:
PA373588
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Camera & Lenses by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
G
Countries:
Sweden, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
28936
SYNOPSIS

Eleven-year-old Pippi Longstocking sails aboard the ship, Hoptoad, with her father, Captain Efraim, and his crew. A storm appears and capsizes the ship. As Pippi and her animal companions, a monkey named Mr. Nilsson and a horse named Alfonso, get swept away, her father yells for her to go to Villa Villekulla, their home in the town of Rocksby. After drifting for days on a raft, Pippi arrives in Rocksby, and goes to Villa Villekulla. Next door, Tommy Settigren and his sister, Annika Settigren, are left home after their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Settigren, leave for the evening. Seeing lights inside the long abandoned Villa Villekulla, they sneak inside and are startled by Alfonso and Mr. Nilsson. Pippi welcomes Tommy and Annika, and tells them stories about her adventures with her father and his crew as they travel the oceans. In the morning, Pippi receives a visit from Mr. Dan Blackhart, a local land developer. Blackhart wants to purchase Villa Villekulla to demolish it, but Pippi is not interested in his offer. Later, Pippi rides Alfonso into town while towing Tommy, Annika, and Mr. Nilsson riding on a motorcycle and sidecar. When they arrive, Pippi sees a group of unhappy children in line at the barbershop. Tommy and Annika say the children are orphans from the Rocksby Children’s Home. Purchasing ice cream, candy and musical instruments, Pippi invites the children to join her for a party. Miss Bannister, the county welfare worker in charge of the Children’s Home, attempts to get the children in order. However, Pippi and the ... +


Eleven-year-old Pippi Longstocking sails aboard the ship, Hoptoad, with her father, Captain Efraim, and his crew. A storm appears and capsizes the ship. As Pippi and her animal companions, a monkey named Mr. Nilsson and a horse named Alfonso, get swept away, her father yells for her to go to Villa Villekulla, their home in the town of Rocksby. After drifting for days on a raft, Pippi arrives in Rocksby, and goes to Villa Villekulla. Next door, Tommy Settigren and his sister, Annika Settigren, are left home after their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Settigren, leave for the evening. Seeing lights inside the long abandoned Villa Villekulla, they sneak inside and are startled by Alfonso and Mr. Nilsson. Pippi welcomes Tommy and Annika, and tells them stories about her adventures with her father and his crew as they travel the oceans. In the morning, Pippi receives a visit from Mr. Dan Blackhart, a local land developer. Blackhart wants to purchase Villa Villekulla to demolish it, but Pippi is not interested in his offer. Later, Pippi rides Alfonso into town while towing Tommy, Annika, and Mr. Nilsson riding on a motorcycle and sidecar. When they arrive, Pippi sees a group of unhappy children in line at the barbershop. Tommy and Annika say the children are orphans from the Rocksby Children’s Home. Purchasing ice cream, candy and musical instruments, Pippi invites the children to join her for a party. Miss Bannister, the county welfare worker in charge of the Children’s Home, attempts to get the children in order. However, Pippi and the children start throwing ice cream at her and one another. Nearby, Mr. Blackhart meets with Mr. Settigren and learns there are no records or deeds relating to Villa Villekulla. Hearing a commotion, they go outside and see the children throwing ice cream. Seeing their father, Tommy and Annika get on the motorcycle as Pippi drives. While the townspeople watch, the motorcycle magically flies over the street. The next day, Miss Bannister visits Pippi and says that as her mother and father are not living with her, she needs to be at the Children’s Home. However, Pippi insists she is fine on her own. Later, while she plays in her tree house with Tommy and Annika, an autogyro flies overhead. Fascinated, Pippi declares she wants to build one for herself. Meanwhile, Mr. Blackhart, wanting to blackmail Pippi into giving up the property, instructs his henchmen, Rancid and Rype, to kidnap Mr. Nilsson and Alfonso. Disguised as Animal Control officials, Rancid and Rype attempt to capture the monkey and horse, but Pippi chases them away. Later, she goes to the town’s airfield to meet Jake, the autogyro builder and pilot. Pippi asks him to take her flying in the contraption, but Jake tells her it is too dangerous. However, Pippi convinces Jake to help her build her own autogyro. In the evening, Pippi has dinner at the Settigren’s house. Afterward, Mrs. Settigren asks Pippi about her mother. Leading Mrs. Settigren outside, Pippi points to a cloud above her house and says her mother is watching her from above. The following day, Miss Bannister obtains an order from the county to remove Pippi from Villa Villekulla. However, a freckled face boy warns Pippi. In her homebuilt autogyro, Pippi, Tommy and Annika fly into the woods. Landing near the river, they set up camp, and in the morning set out on a hike along the river. Pippi sees an overturned barrel cart, and suggests they float downstream in barrels. However, they approach a waterfall and are unable to swim to shore. Before they fall over, Jake’s autogyro appears, and he and Mr. Settigren lift the children to safety. Pippi finds Miss Bannister at Villa Villekulla waiting for her to move her into the Children’s Home. Pippi agrees to go, but only until Christmas, believing her father will return. Unhappy at the Children’s Home, Pippi looks to the clouds and asks her mother for advice. Suddenly, Pippi gets the idea to send her father a message in a bottle. Pippi sneaks to the attic, but Greg the Glue Man, startles her. He tells her that his invention, Gregory’s Gripping Glue, only sticks when needed. Covering the soles of her shoes with glue, Pippi is able to walk down the side of the building. On the beach, Pippi throws her bottle into the water. However, when she returns, the Children’s Home is on fire. Firefighters yell for the Glue Man, and Chrissy and Billy, the last orphans trapped inside, to jump into the safety net. The Glue Man lands safely, but the orphans are too afraid. With her monkey, Mr. Nilsson, Pippi climbs a telephone pole. Tying a rope around Mr. Nilsson, she throws him to the attic window and secures the line. Pippi walks on the tightrope and carries the children back. As Chrissy and Billy climb down, Pippi returns to the attic for Mr. Nilsson. However, the rope breaks, and they land in the net. After witnessing Pippi’s heroics, Miss Bannister lets Pippi return to her home at Villa Villekulla. On Christmas morning, Tommy and Annika open presents with Pippi. Suddenly, Captain Efraim arrives and tells the children about how he was washed ashore upon an island of cannibals and made their king. Afterward, he says they must leave, as he promised Pippi would be the island’s new princess. The townspeople of Rocksby go to the dock, and wish Pippi, her father, and the crew of the Hoptoad farewell. Seeing Tommy and Annika crying at her departure, Pippi tells her father that she wants to stay with her new friends. Captain Efraim agrees, and Pippi swims back to shore with Mr. Nilsson and Alfonso. +

Legend
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Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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