Oliver & Company (1988)

G | 73 mins | Children's works | 18 November 1988

Director:

George Scribner

Production Designer:

Dan Hansen

Production Companies:

Walt Disney Pictures , Silver Screen Partners III
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HISTORY

An early announcement in the 25 Sep 1985 HR referred to an upcoming adaption of Charles Dickens’s 1883 novel Oliver Twist that would be an animated feature that included a live actor onscreen portraying the character of “Fagin.”
       The 17 Dec 1986 Var production chart noted that production on the picture, under the working title of Oliver, began in Sep 1986 in Glendale, CA. Production notes in AMPAS library files noted that as part of research for the picture, production stylist Guy Deel and art director Dan Hansen took photographs of New York eighteen inches from the ground, as a reference for a dog-eye view of the city. Including the over 119,275 hand painted cels, the film’s painted backgrounds incorporated Xerox process overlays, a technique previously employed on the 1961 Walt Disney production One Hundred and One Dalmatians (see entry). An article in the 13 Nov 1988 NYT reported that the picture also contained up to “eleven minutes of computer-assisted imagery.”
       Another working title of the film was Oliver and the Dodger, as noted in the 17 Aug 1987 LAT.
       Although the 27 Jul 1986 NYT reported the picture’s anticipated release date was Christmas 1987, the film held its world premiere the following year at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York City on 13 Nov 1988, as noted by the 15 Nov 1988 DV. Proceeds from the premiere went to a challenge grant the American Museum of the Moving Picture (AMMI) received from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in Oct 1988.
       ... More Less

An early announcement in the 25 Sep 1985 HR referred to an upcoming adaption of Charles Dickens’s 1883 novel Oliver Twist that would be an animated feature that included a live actor onscreen portraying the character of “Fagin.”
       The 17 Dec 1986 Var production chart noted that production on the picture, under the working title of Oliver, began in Sep 1986 in Glendale, CA. Production notes in AMPAS library files noted that as part of research for the picture, production stylist Guy Deel and art director Dan Hansen took photographs of New York eighteen inches from the ground, as a reference for a dog-eye view of the city. Including the over 119,275 hand painted cels, the film’s painted backgrounds incorporated Xerox process overlays, a technique previously employed on the 1961 Walt Disney production One Hundred and One Dalmatians (see entry). An article in the 13 Nov 1988 NYT reported that the picture also contained up to “eleven minutes of computer-assisted imagery.”
       Another working title of the film was Oliver and the Dodger, as noted in the 17 Aug 1987 LAT.
       Although the 27 Jul 1986 NYT reported the picture’s anticipated release date was Christmas 1987, the film held its world premiere the following year at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York City on 13 Nov 1988, as noted by the 15 Nov 1988 DV. Proceeds from the premiere went to a challenge grant the American Museum of the Moving Picture (AMMI) received from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in Oct 1988.
       The following week after the picture’s release on 18 Nov 1988 on 952 screens, the 22 Nov 1988 LAT reported that the box-office gross was $4 million. As reported in the 1 Jan 1989 LAT and the 18 Jan 1989 Var, theaters owned by United Artists Communications, Inc. and Cineplex Odeon boycotted the film as a protest against Buena Vista Distribution’s new policy of theaters bidding for motion pictures. However, Buena Vista booked Oliver & Company in alternative venues, such as smaller theaters and converted auditoriums.
       According to the 25 Jan 1989 LAT, the picture obtained a new record for an animated feature film at the time, earning $48,194,729 at the box-office.
       On 29 Mar 1996, the picture was re-issued in theaters on 2,180 screens. According to the 2 Apr 1996 LAT, the film grossed $4.5 million over the opening weekend.
       A number of screen adaptations of Oliver Twist have been filmed, including: The Modern Oliver Twist; or, `The Life of a Pickpocket’ (1906, see entry), Oliver Twist (1922, see entry), Oliver Twist (1933, see entry), and Oliver! (1968, see entry).
       The film marked the feature directorial debut for George Scribner.
       Oliver & Company was nominated for one Golden Globe Award in the category of Best Original Song for “Why Should I Worry?”
       End credits state: “Database for New York City Skyline courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.” End credits also state: “Special Thanks to Burny Mattinson; James Orr & Jim Cruickshank; and Pete Young.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Nov 1988
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Sep 1985.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 1988
p. 5, 17.
Los Angeles Times
17 Aug 1987
Calendar, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
18 Nov 1988
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
22 Nov 1988
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jan 1989
Calendar, p. 24.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jan 1989
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
2 Apr 1996
Calendar, p. 5.
New York Times
27 Jul 1986
Section A, p. 16.
New York Times
13 Nov 1988
Section A, p. 22.
New York Times
18 Nov 1988
Section C, p. 8.
Variety
17 Dec 1986
p. 6.
Variety
16 Nov 1988
p. 19.
Variety
18 Jan 1989
p. 31.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Walt Disney Pictures presents
produced in association with Silver Screen Partners III
Distributed by Buena Vista Pictures Distribution, Inc.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir
Asst prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
WRITERS
Anim scr
Anim scr
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Addl story material
Addl story material
Addl story material
Addl story material
Addl story material
PHOTOGRAPHY
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Post-prod supv
MUSIC
Orig score by
Mus supv
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Score rec
Score rec
Score rec
Score rec
Score rec
Score orchestrated by
SOUND
Sd des and supv
Sd reader
Sd ed
Sd ed
A.D.R. ed
A.D.R. ed
A.D.R. ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Sd asst
Sd asst
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec at
Re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Computer graphics eng
Eff graphics
Spec optical printing
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod consultant
Casting
Casting
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Auditor
Auditor
ANIMATION
Supv anim
Supv anim
Supv anim
Supv anim
Supv anim
Supv anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char anim
Char des
Char des
Char des
Prod stylist
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Backgrounds
Coord anim
Coord anim
Coord anim
Coord anim
Coord anim
Coord anim
Char key
Char key
Char key
Char key
Char key
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Eff anim
Computer anim
Computer anim
Color model
Color model
Color model
Color model
Anim asst
Anim asst
Anim asst
Anim asst
Anim asst
Anim asst
Asst
Asst
Asst
Asst
Asst
Eff asst
Eff asst
Eff asst
Eff asst
Eff asst
Eff asst
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Breakdown/Inbetweens
Scene planning
Scene planning
Scene planning
Anim check
Anim check
Anim check
Anim check
Anim check
Mgr, Ink & paint
Asst mgr, Ink & paint
Secy, Ink & paint
Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Post punch
Post punch
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Xerox check/Inking
Paint lab
Paint lab
Paint lab
Paint lab
Paint lab
Paint lab
Paint lab
Final check
Final check
Final check
Final check
Final check
Final check
Cel cleaner
Cel cleaner
Cel cleaner
Painting supv
Painting supv
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
Painting
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col
SOURCES
LITERARY
Inspired by Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist (London, 1838).
SONGS
“Once Upon A Time In New York City,” music by Barry Mann, lyrics by Howard Ashman, produced by Stewart Levine, performed by Huey Lewis
“Why Should I Worry?” written by Dan Hartman & Charlie Midnight, produced by Phil Ramone, performed by Billy Joel
“Streets Of Gold,” music by Tom Snow, lyrics by Dean Pitchford, produced by Tom Snow, performed by Ruth Pointer
+
SONGS
“Once Upon A Time In New York City,” music by Barry Mann, lyrics by Howard Ashman, produced by Stewart Levine, performed by Huey Lewis
“Why Should I Worry?” written by Dan Hartman & Charlie Midnight, produced by Phil Ramone, performed by Billy Joel
“Streets Of Gold,” music by Tom Snow, lyrics by Dean Pitchford, produced by Tom Snow, performed by Ruth Pointer
“Perfect Isn’t Easy,” written by Barry Manilow, Jack Feldman & Bruce Sussman, produced by Barry Manilow, performed by Bette Midler
“Good Company,” music and lyrics by Ron Rocha and Robert Minkoff, produced by J. A. C. Redford, performed by Myhanh Tran
“Buscando Guayaba,” written by Ruben Blades, produced by Willie Colin, performed by Ruben Blades, courtesy of Fania Records
“Fast Lane,” written and performed by Rocky Pedilla, Michael Eckhart, Jon St. James.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Oliver
Oliver and the Dodger
Release Date:
18 November 1988
Premiere Information:
World premiere at Ziegfeld Theatre in New York City: 13 November 1988
Nationwide release: 18 November 1988
Re-release: 29 March 1996
Production Date:
began September 1986
Copyright Claimant:
The Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
22 November 1988
Copyright Number:
PA385556
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Animation
Prints
Prints by Metrocolor®
Duration(in mins):
73
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29386
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, a cardboard box with a litter of kittens is placed on the sidewalk, advertising that they need a home. As people adopt them, the last one left is an orange kitten named Oliver. During a rainstorm, the box breaks apart and Oliver flees for shelter. In the morning, Oliver is hungry and wanders to a hot dog stand. However, Louie, the vendor, yells at him to leave. As Oliver turns away, Dodger, a streetwise dog, approaches. Instructing Oliver to distract Louie, Dodger steals sausage links, but refuses to share with the kitten. Feeling cheated, Oliver follows Dodger to a barge tied up beneath the docks. Sneaking inside, Oliver sees Dodger share the sausages with four other dogs: Tito the Chihuahua; Francis the Bulldog; Einstein the Great Dane; and Rita the Saluki. As the dogs eat, Fagin, the barge’s owner and a pickpocket, arrives home worried that he does not have enough money to repay a loan from Sykes, owner of Sykes Shipping and a loan shark. Suddenly, Roscoe and Desoto, Sykes’ two Doberman Pinschers, burst onto the barge. As Fagin goes to speak to Sykes on the dock, Desoto finds Oliver hiding. Scared, Oliver scratches Desoto’s nose. Desoto and Roscoe chase him, but Dodger recognizes Oliver and orders them to leave him alone. Meanwhile, Fagin tells Sykes he does not have the money. Upset, Sykes threatens Fagin to pay him back in three days. Returning to the barge, Fagin asks the dogs who scratched Desoto’s nose. When they show him Oliver, Fagin invites the kitten to be a ... +


In New York City, a cardboard box with a litter of kittens is placed on the sidewalk, advertising that they need a home. As people adopt them, the last one left is an orange kitten named Oliver. During a rainstorm, the box breaks apart and Oliver flees for shelter. In the morning, Oliver is hungry and wanders to a hot dog stand. However, Louie, the vendor, yells at him to leave. As Oliver turns away, Dodger, a streetwise dog, approaches. Instructing Oliver to distract Louie, Dodger steals sausage links, but refuses to share with the kitten. Feeling cheated, Oliver follows Dodger to a barge tied up beneath the docks. Sneaking inside, Oliver sees Dodger share the sausages with four other dogs: Tito the Chihuahua; Francis the Bulldog; Einstein the Great Dane; and Rita the Saluki. As the dogs eat, Fagin, the barge’s owner and a pickpocket, arrives home worried that he does not have enough money to repay a loan from Sykes, owner of Sykes Shipping and a loan shark. Suddenly, Roscoe and Desoto, Sykes’ two Doberman Pinschers, burst onto the barge. As Fagin goes to speak to Sykes on the dock, Desoto finds Oliver hiding. Scared, Oliver scratches Desoto’s nose. Desoto and Roscoe chase him, but Dodger recognizes Oliver and orders them to leave him alone. Meanwhile, Fagin tells Sykes he does not have the money. Upset, Sykes threatens Fagin to pay him back in three days. Returning to the barge, Fagin asks the dogs who scratched Desoto’s nose. When they show him Oliver, Fagin invites the kitten to be a part of their crew. The following day, Fagin drives the dogs and Oliver into the city on his scooter with an attached basket, and instructs the animals to find the money to pay Sykes. Seeing a limousine, Dodger plans to steal the car stereo. As Dodger instructs how to stop the car, Jenny Foxworth, a lonely little girl, reads a letter aloud to the family butler and chauffeur, Winston, that her parents will not return home from Europe in time for her birthday. At Dodger’s signal, Einstein and Francis create a distraction to get Winston out of the limousine. When Tito and Oliver try to remove the stereo, Jenny startles them. The wires shock Tito, throwing him out of the vehicle. Seeing Oliver, Jenny offers to take him to her home as her new pet. Arriving at her family’s Fifth Avenue townhouse, Jenny shows Oliver around as Winston awakens the Foxworths’ champion show dog, Georgette. When Jenny informs Georgette that Oliver will be living with them, the Poodle becomes jealous. Meanwhile, Dodger believes Oliver is in trouble for the failed heist, and makes a plan to rescue him. After Jenny leaves for school, Dodger, Tito, Francis, Einstein and Rita break into the house and run into Georgette. When Dodger explains they came for Oliver, Georgette happily leads the dogs to where the kitten is napping. Seeing Oliver with a new collar, Rita suggests he stay with Jenny. However, Georgette insists he should leave immediately. Placing Oliver inside a pillowcase, the dogs return to Fagin’s barge. After awakening, Oliver tells them he was happy in his new home. Insulted that Oliver thinks the crew is too lowbred, Dodger tells him to leave. Fagin returns and sees Oliver’s collar with a tag listing Jenny’s Fifth Avenue address. Seeing his chance to pay back Sykes, Fagin writes a ransom note demanding money for Oliver’s return. After telling Sykes he will have his money after collecting the ransom, Fagin, Oliver and the dogs go to the docks. Jenny arrives with Georgette and her piggy bank. Fagin feels guilty and pretends to “find” Oliver for Jenny. Suddenly, Sykes drives up and kidnaps Jenny for his own ransom plan. Following Sykes to his warehouse, Oliver and the dogs sneak inside to find Jenny guarded by Desoto and Roscoe. Creating distractions, Oliver, Dodger, and the others free Jenny and escape with Fagin on his scooter. Fagin drives onto subway tracks leading to a bridge over the river, but Sykes and his dogs follow. Sykes grabs Jenny and Oliver bites his hand, while Dodger fights off Desoto and Roscoe. With a train coming toward them, Jenny jumps into Fagin’s arms and Tito steers the scooter onto a bridge suspension cable. Before the train hits Sykes’s car, Oliver and Dodger jump to safety. Later, Jenny celebrates her birthday with her pets, Oliver and Georgette, and her new friends, Dodger, Francis, Einstein, Rita, Tito and Fagin. Afterward, Fagin and the dogs say goodbye, but Dodger tells Oliver that he will always be a part of their crew. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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