Run (1991)

R | 89 mins | Comedy-drama | 1 February 1991

Director:

Geoff Burrowes

Producer:

Raymond Wagner

Cinematographer:

Bruce Surtees

Production Designer:

John Willett

Production Company:

Hollywood Pictures
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HISTORY

A news item in the 10 Mar 1987 HR reported that producer Raymond Wagner was considering dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov for the lead role. The part eventually went to actor Patrick Dempsey.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, the screenplay was inspired by a news story from the 1970s about a young man who robbed a “small-time” gambling casino and was murdered by the owners within ninety minutes. After reading the story, screenwriter Dennis Shryack tried to imagine what went through the young man’s mind while trying to escape his pursuers. Principal photography began 4 Apr 1990 at the Park Royal Shopping Centre in West Vancouver, Canada. Other Vancouver locations included the former University Club, which served as the “Smokehouse” casino. Night filming in Vancouver was complicated by the city’s northern latitude and short nights during spring and summer, which offered as few as six hours of darkness.
       As reported in the 1 May 1990 HR, actress Tracy Pollan, cast as “Karen Landers,” agreed to leave the production 22 Apr 1990, because she was “no longer right for the role.” Ten days later, the 11 May 1990 DV announced Kelly Preston as Pollan’s replacement. Production notes state that Preston was trained by experts in card dealing, and practiced long hours in preparation for her role. She also performed some of her own stunts, as did Dempsey, who required “five stitches inside his mouth” following a fistfight sequence in which he was accidentally struck by actor Sean McCann.
       The scene in which a police car falls from the top of a parking ... More Less

A news item in the 10 Mar 1987 HR reported that producer Raymond Wagner was considering dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov for the lead role. The part eventually went to actor Patrick Dempsey.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, the screenplay was inspired by a news story from the 1970s about a young man who robbed a “small-time” gambling casino and was murdered by the owners within ninety minutes. After reading the story, screenwriter Dennis Shryack tried to imagine what went through the young man’s mind while trying to escape his pursuers. Principal photography began 4 Apr 1990 at the Park Royal Shopping Centre in West Vancouver, Canada. Other Vancouver locations included the former University Club, which served as the “Smokehouse” casino. Night filming in Vancouver was complicated by the city’s northern latitude and short nights during spring and summer, which offered as few as six hours of darkness.
       As reported in the 1 May 1990 HR, actress Tracy Pollan, cast as “Karen Landers,” agreed to leave the production 22 Apr 1990, because she was “no longer right for the role.” Ten days later, the 11 May 1990 DV announced Kelly Preston as Pollan’s replacement. Production notes state that Preston was trained by experts in card dealing, and practiced long hours in preparation for her role. She also performed some of her own stunts, as did Dempsey, who required “five stitches inside his mouth” following a fistfight sequence in which he was accidentally struck by actor Sean McCann.
       The scene in which a police car falls from the top of a parking structure was accomplished using two different rigs: one that enabled the car to crash sideways through a fence, and another that caused the car to teeter, then slide over the ledge. The teetering effect was accomplished with hydraulics, and a counterweight system facilitated the car’s descent. Actor Michael MacRae, who played police officer “Smithy,” refused to enter either rig, due to his severe acrophobia. The special effects crew prepared for the stunt by weakening the structure of test cars and pushing them off a cliff to determine the angles at which they fell. From these tests, the crew determined the angle at which the car would rotate while falling and land on its roof. The stunt was reportedly achieved in a single take.
       Photography in Vancouver ended 20 Jul 1990, followed by two days of location filming in the cities of Cambridge and Lawrence, MA.
       Run opened on 1 Feb 1991, garnering lukewarm to negative reviews.
       End credits include the following statements: “The producers wish to thank: Rocky Parker; the British Columbia Film Commission; City of Vancouver, British Columbia; the B.C. Jockey Club, Exhibition Park, Vancouver, British Columbia; Multnomah Kennel Club, Portland, Oregon; Greyhounds for Pets, Inc., Portland, Oregon; Massachusetts Film Office”; “Filmed at the North Shore Studios, Vancouver, British Columbia”; and, “Sincere appreciation to the Motion Picture Studio Production Technicians, I.A.T.S.E/ Local 891, Vancouver, Canada.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
11 May 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 May 1990
p. 1, 62.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 1991
p. 12, 18.
Los Angeles Times
1 Feb 1991
p. 4.
New York Times
1 Feb 1991
p. 15.
Variety
4 Apr 1990.
---
Variety
11 Apr 1990.
---
Variety
4 Feb 1991
p. 88.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Hollywood Pictures presents
in association with Silver Screen Partners IV
A Raymond Wagner Production
A Geoff Burrowes Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
3d asst dir
DGC trainee
DGC trainee
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
Unit prod mgr/1st asst dir, 2d unit (Portland)
Unit prod mgr, 2d unit (Boston)
1st asst dir, 2d unit (Boston)
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
Steadicam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Video tech
Video playback
Rigging gaffer
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Canadian dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit (Boston)
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Set dresser
Head greens
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Head scenic artist
Scenic painter
Const foreman (Hong Kong)
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus mixed by
Mus rec by
Synthesizers programmed by
Mus mixed at
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Spec eff asst
Process compositing by
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Video tech
Video playback
Head greens
Craft service
Prod coord
Asst to the prod
Asst to Mr. Burrowes
Asst to Mr. Burrowes
Const coord
Const foreman
Engineering consultant
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst prod coord
Prod asst
Prod accountant
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-captain
Extras casting
ADR voice casting
Animal handler
Loc mgr, 2d unit
Loc mgr, 2d unit (Boston)
Prod coord, 2d unit (Boston)
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Addl stunts
Addl stunts
Addl stunts
Addl stunts
Addl stunts
Addl stunts
Addl stunts
Addl stunts
Addl stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
SONGS
"T For Trouble," written by Colin James, Bill Carter and Ruth Ellsworth, performed by Colin James, courtesy of Virgin Records America, Inc.
"Time To Mek A Dime," written by Roger Charlery, performed by Ranking Roger, courtesy of IRS Records
"Never Be Alone," written by Trevy Felix, performed by Boom Shaka, courtesy of International Distribution Company
+
SONGS
"T For Trouble," written by Colin James, Bill Carter and Ruth Ellsworth, performed by Colin James, courtesy of Virgin Records America, Inc.
"Time To Mek A Dime," written by Roger Charlery, performed by Ranking Roger, courtesy of IRS Records
"Never Be Alone," written by Trevy Felix, performed by Boom Shaka, courtesy of International Distribution Company
"Song For Jah," written by Trevy Felix, performed by Boom Shaka, courtesy of International Distribution Company
"Make Believe And Pretend," written by Dennis Hill, Rick Sanchez, Andre Bonter and Joseph Phillipi, performed by The Poorboys, courtesy of Hollywood Records
"If You Lean On Me," written by L. Golden and T. Farragher, performed by Colin James, courtesy of Virgin Records America, Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 February 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 1 February 1991
Production Date:
4 April--late July 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Hollywood Pictures Company, an accepted alt. of the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
1 February 1991
Copyright Number:
PA498301
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Panavision
Prints
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
89
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
Canada, United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University law student Charlie Farrow wins a poker game with his roommates, who are amazed by his consistent good luck. His employer, an automobile mechanic, assigns Charlie to deliver a customer’s Porsche to Atlantic City, New Jersey. When the car breaks down near Sawtucket, Connecticut, Charlie leaves it with a mechanic, then asks a taxicab driver to take him to a good restaurant. Based on his customer’s car and destination, the driver incorrectly concludes that Charlie is a wealthy gambler, and takes him to the Smokehouse, an illegal gambling casino. Charlie joins a poker game conducted by dealer Karen Landers. Denny Halloran, an ill-tempered gangster who has lost steadily throughout the game, blames Karen for his bad luck and insists on dealing the next hand himself. When Charlie wins the hand, Karen advises him to leave the casino while Denny is in the restroom. Denny intercepts Charlie at the exit, but trips and strikes his head on a marble counter, which kills him instantly. Karen witnesses the incident and advises Charlie to leave town. Charlie returns to the waiting taxicab and explains his plight to the driver, who reveals that Denny was the son of crime boss Matt Halloran, and pushes Charlie from the car. Charlie runs to the repair shop to find it surrounded by gangsters, and the Porsche destroyed by a runaway bulldozer. Meanwhile, in his office at the dog track, Matt Halloran is offered condolences by Police Chief Travers. Although the crime boss wants revenge against his son’s purported killer, Travers insists on following legal protocol. Matt Halloran wins ... +


In Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University law student Charlie Farrow wins a poker game with his roommates, who are amazed by his consistent good luck. His employer, an automobile mechanic, assigns Charlie to deliver a customer’s Porsche to Atlantic City, New Jersey. When the car breaks down near Sawtucket, Connecticut, Charlie leaves it with a mechanic, then asks a taxicab driver to take him to a good restaurant. Based on his customer’s car and destination, the driver incorrectly concludes that Charlie is a wealthy gambler, and takes him to the Smokehouse, an illegal gambling casino. Charlie joins a poker game conducted by dealer Karen Landers. Denny Halloran, an ill-tempered gangster who has lost steadily throughout the game, blames Karen for his bad luck and insists on dealing the next hand himself. When Charlie wins the hand, Karen advises him to leave the casino while Denny is in the restroom. Denny intercepts Charlie at the exit, but trips and strikes his head on a marble counter, which kills him instantly. Karen witnesses the incident and advises Charlie to leave town. Charlie returns to the waiting taxicab and explains his plight to the driver, who reveals that Denny was the son of crime boss Matt Halloran, and pushes Charlie from the car. Charlie runs to the repair shop to find it surrounded by gangsters, and the Porsche destroyed by a runaway bulldozer. Meanwhile, in his office at the dog track, Matt Halloran is offered condolences by Police Chief Travers. Although the crime boss wants revenge against his son’s purported killer, Travers insists on following legal protocol. Matt Halloran wins the argument by threatening the life of the chief’s son. He offers his men $50,000 to capture Charlie alive, and circulates a photograph of Charlie Farrow to the news media. At the police station, Detective Martins is puzzled by the case, noting that Charlie has no criminal past, and would likely not survive a fight with Denny Halloran. His colleague, Sergeant Halsey, advises Martins not to question the logic, hinting at the rampant corruption in their town. That evening, Charlie calls Chief Travers from a telephone booth, asking for police protection. He gives the chief his location and waits nearby while another man enters the booth. Seconds later, Halloran’s thugs abduct the man in the booth, while police officers O’Rourke and Smithy follow Charlie, hoping to capture him for the reward. Charlie takes refuge in a bowling alley, where a vigilant cashier notifies Matt Halloran. Henchmen Marv and Sammy are deployed, and after a harrowing pursuit through the pin-setting apparatus, Charlie escapes to find O’Rourke and Smithy waiting outside. Ignoring Charlie’s request for police protection, the two officers turn him over to Sammy and Marv. Sgt. Halsey appears, demanding to know why the officers have been ignoring calls from the station. When Charlie breaks free and runs toward Halsey, O’Rourke fires his gun and accidentally kills the sergeant. Sammy and Marv leave the scene in a panic, while O’Rourke notifies the police dispatcher and blames Charlie for the shooting. Charlie commandeers Halsey’s car, with the two officers in pursuit. Although Smithy is shaken by their colleague’s death, O’Rourke is determined to get the reward, and threatens to implicate his partner in the shooting if he refuses to comply. Meanwhile, Det. Martins informs Chief Travers that witnesses at the Smokehouse all gave dissimilar accounts, causing him to question Charlie’s guilt. The chief dismisses Martin’s concerns, noting that Charlie has killed Sgt. Halsey. With the entire police force and Halloran’s gang searching for him, Charlie tries to blend into the crowd at a shopping mall. Karen Landers notices Charlie among the shoppers and makes her way toward the exit, hoping to avoid him. When Charlie’s photograph appears on a television broadcast, he is confronted by Bill, a mall security guard. Charlie grabs Bill’s gun and disappears into the crowd as Det. Martins orders the exits blocked. Realizing he is trapped, Charlie falsely alerts the crowd to the presence of a bomb, and joins the stampede toward the exits. He recognizes Karen Landers in the parking lot and climbs into her car, begging for her assistance. Upon arriving at her home, Karen tries to run away from Charlie, but he promises to leave after he telephones the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Unknown to Charlie, the FBI traces the call and directs police to Karen’s house. O’Rourke volunteers himself and Smithy as the first to enter, intending to kill Charlie, unaware that Karen and Charlie are speeding toward the city limits, planning to expose Matt Halloran in the national media. Two of Halloran’s thugs intercept Karen and Charlie, and chase them through an amusement park, riddling their car with bullets. The thugs strike a utility pole and are electrocuted by downed power lines. When Charlie takes Karen to the hospital for a minor bullet wound, he is discovered by O’Rourke and Smithy, who pursue him through the hospital parking structure. Charlie steals a pickup truck and rams the police car, causing it to teeter on a ledge five stories above the street. He counterbalances the car by leaning on the bumper, but it breaks loose and both officers are killed in the fall. Charlie surrenders to police, and is taken into custody by Travers and Martins. Suspecting that Charlie is innocent of his alleged crimes, Travers intends to deliver him to the FBI office in a neighboring county. However, Sammy and Marv appear from behind and force the car off an embankment, leaving Travers dead and Martins unconscious. Charlie is taken to Matt Halloran’s office at the dog track, where he tries to explain Denny’s accidental death. Hallorans beats Charlie, then orders Sammy and Marv to drop him from the roof of the building. As they throw him over the edge, Charlie grabs onto Marv’s pants and climbs to safety, while causing both gangsters to fall to their deaths. Halloran sees his henchmen fall past the window and alerts Frank, his security chief. Frank chases Charlie into the kitchen, where he is knocked unconscious and relieved of his gun. Charlie takes refuge in a shed containing the track’s mechanical rabbit mechanism. Halloran inadvertently activates the device as he fires his gun through the door. The crime boss corners Charlie inside, but is impaled on the mechanical rabbit. Det. Martins bursts through the door and is astonished by Charlie’s unlikely victory. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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