Stone Cold (1991)

R | 93 mins | Drama | 17 May 1991

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HISTORY

According to the 5 Jul 1990 DV, principal photography began 4 Jun 1990 in Mobile, AL. Twenty days later, the production moved to Biloxi, MS, where filming resumed 29 Jun 1990. During the hiatus, director Bruce Malmuth was fired after the producers determined his action sequences to be unsatisfactory. Malmuth was replaced by director Craig R. Baxley, a former stuntman who specialized in action films. Although it had not been determined whether any of Malmuth’s footage would be salvaged, an unnamed executive for distributor Columbia Pictures declared the scenes “unusable.” Filming was expected to conclude in Jackson, MS, within three to four weeks. The picture was referenced by its working title, The Brotherhood. On 16 Jul 1990, DV announced that Barry & Enright Productions “amicably resolved” the company’s $2 million suit against Baxley for abandoning its television production, Not of This World (1991), to direct The Brotherhood.
       Production was halted a second time, as reported in the 17 Jul 1990 DV, due to a dispute with the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE). Although producer Yoram Ben Ami agreed to a 15 Jul 1990 meeting with IATSE officials, he refused to sign a contract or recognize the union. Approximately thirty crewmembers stopped work to picket the production. Ben Ami told the 18 Jul 1990 HR that he would continue to defy IATSE and replace the striking crewmembers, as The Brotherhood was a “non-union production.” Attorney Scott Witlin of the production company, Stone Group, believed several technicians walked out to avoid being fined by ... More Less

According to the 5 Jul 1990 DV, principal photography began 4 Jun 1990 in Mobile, AL. Twenty days later, the production moved to Biloxi, MS, where filming resumed 29 Jun 1990. During the hiatus, director Bruce Malmuth was fired after the producers determined his action sequences to be unsatisfactory. Malmuth was replaced by director Craig R. Baxley, a former stuntman who specialized in action films. Although it had not been determined whether any of Malmuth’s footage would be salvaged, an unnamed executive for distributor Columbia Pictures declared the scenes “unusable.” Filming was expected to conclude in Jackson, MS, within three to four weeks. The picture was referenced by its working title, The Brotherhood. On 16 Jul 1990, DV announced that Barry & Enright Productions “amicably resolved” the company’s $2 million suit against Baxley for abandoning its television production, Not of This World (1991), to direct The Brotherhood.
       Production was halted a second time, as reported in the 17 Jul 1990 DV, due to a dispute with the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE). Although producer Yoram Ben Ami agreed to a 15 Jul 1990 meeting with IATSE officials, he refused to sign a contract or recognize the union. Approximately thirty crewmembers stopped work to picket the production. Ben Ami told the 18 Jul 1990 HR that he would continue to defy IATSE and replace the striking crewmembers, as The Brotherhood was a “non-union production.” Attorney Scott Witlin of the production company, Stone Group, believed several technicians walked out to avoid being fined by the IATSE for working without a union contract, and an unnamed company spokesman denied reports of picketing strikers. Because the Mississippi Film Office could only provide “secondary- and tertiary-level” crewmembers, Ben Ami was expected to hire replacements from New Orleans, LA. Among the strikers was director of photography John Leonetti, who was not credited onscreen.
       The 7 Aug 1990 DV announced the production’s move to the Arkansas capital city of Little Rock, after the governor of Mississippi reneged on his predecessor’s agreement with Ben Ami to allow filming in the capitol building in Jackson. Phil Cole of the Mississippi Film Office resigned in protest. Ben Ami expected the production to contribute at least $1 million to Little Rock’s economy, entitling the company to a five percent sales tax rebate.
       As reported in the 24 Mar 1991 LAT, the picture, officially titled Stone Cold, was scheduled for a 17 May 1991 release, with an “NC-17” rating from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). Executives at Stone Group, referred to in the article as “Stonebridge Entertainment,” appealed the rating, and obtained an “R” prior to the film’s release.
       The picture opened to lukewarm notices, exemplified by the review in the 20 May 1991 HR, which described the “half-baked action thriller” as “enjoyable.” The review also noted that former football player Brian Bosworth performed his own stunts. Stone Cold marked Bosworth’s feature film debut.
       The 23 Aug 1991 DV stated that Epic Productions, Inc., filed suit against Yoram Ben Ami for allegedly inflating the film’s $7 million budget to $15 million. According to the suit, Ben Ami “disrupted relations” with Brian Bosworth, creating tensions on the set that extended the production schedule; demanded numerous rewrites, including dialogue for background actors, which increased their pay scale; lied about his arrangements to film inside the Mississippi capitol; and obtained free lodging while on location, but continued to claim hotel expenses. Although Ben Ami was credited as unit production manager, he allegedly gave the job to a man believed to be his brother-in-law, who was not a member of the Directors Guild of America (DGA). The plaintiffs were seeking damages of at least $8 million. No further information on the outcome of the case has been available at the time of this writing.
       End credits include the following statements: “Special Thanks to: Philip M. Leonard; Karen Rea; Switch USA – Issac Cohen; H&L Enterprises; Aquarius Transfermation; The State and People of Arkansas; Arkansas Secretary of State Bill McCuen”; and “Special thanks to: Credit Lyonnais Bank, Nederland, N.V., for their financing and assistance.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Jul 1990
p. 1, 22.
Daily Variety
16 Jul 1990.
---
Daily Variety
17 Jul 1990.
---
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1990.
---
Daily Variety
23 Aug 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jul 1990
p. 3, 21.
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 1991
p. 9, 16.
Los Angeles Times
24 Mar 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 May 1991
p. 6.
New York Times
18 May 1991
p. 16.
Variety
27 May 1991
p. 78.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
William Forsythe
[and]
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Stone Group Pictures Presents
A Mace Neufeld/Yoram Ben Ami/Walter Doniger/Production
A Craig R. Baxley Film
A Columbia Pictures Realease
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
"B" cam op
1st asst "B" cam
2d asst "B" cam
Addl cam asst
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog, Sygma
Still photog
Dir of photog, Addl photog
"A" cam op, Addl photog
1st asst cam, Addl photog
2d asst cam, Addl photog
"B" cam op, Addl photog
1st asst "B" cam, Addl photog
2d asst "B" cam, Addl photog
Aerial photog, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
Best boy grip, Addl photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Exec in charge of post prod
Film ed
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Swing gang
Swing gang
On set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Weapons master
Const coord
Const foreman
Shop foreman
Shopper
Const laborer
Tool laborer
Lead carpenter
Lead carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Set painter
Paint foreman
Painter
Painter
Stand-by painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus supv, for Third Stone
Mus coord
Mus coord
Mus coord, for Third Stone
Supv mus ed
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Sd eff
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR supv
ADR rec at
Voice group coord
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley rec at
Sd transfer
Sd transfer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Titles and opticals by
Title des
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
2d makeup artist
Key hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Helicopter pilot
Helicopter ground coord
Scr supv
Exec in charge of prod
Prod controller
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Key set prod asst
Key set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Picture cars
Dispatcher
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver for Mr. Baxley
Motorcycle coord
Extra casting
Prod accountant
Asst auditor
Asst auditor
Unit pub
Mr. Bosworth's acting coach
Caterer
Asst caterer
Craft service
Script supv, Addl photog
Prod secy, Addl photog
Loc mgr, Addl photog
Transportation coord, Addl photog
Transportation capt, Addl photog
Brocket's Beasts
Brocket's Beasts
Mr. Baxley's asst
Mr. Baxley's asst
Producer's asst
Completion guarantor
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Dangerous,” performed by: The Doobie Brothers, written: by Pat Simmons, publisher: Soquel Songs/ASCAP, courtesy of: Capitol Records
“Ooh Baby,” performed by: Cryer, written: by Paul Colt, Pete Skyes, Ricky Hart, Steve Rose, publisher: Cryer Boys Music/Third Stone From The Middle Music/WB Music Corp./ASCAP, courtesy of: Third Stone/Atlantic Records
“Johnny Was A User,” performed by: Cryer, written: by Paul Colt, Pete Skyes, Ricky Hart, Steve Rose, publisher: Cryer Boys Music/Third Stone From The Middle Music/WB Music Corp./ASCAP, courtesy of: Third Stone/Atlantic Records
+
SONGS
“Dangerous,” performed by: The Doobie Brothers, written: by Pat Simmons, publisher: Soquel Songs/ASCAP, courtesy of: Capitol Records
“Ooh Baby,” performed by: Cryer, written: by Paul Colt, Pete Skyes, Ricky Hart, Steve Rose, publisher: Cryer Boys Music/Third Stone From The Middle Music/WB Music Corp./ASCAP, courtesy of: Third Stone/Atlantic Records
“Johnny Was A User,” performed by: Cryer, written: by Paul Colt, Pete Skyes, Ricky Hart, Steve Rose, publisher: Cryer Boys Music/Third Stone From The Middle Music/WB Music Corp./ASCAP, courtesy of: Third Stone/Atlantic Records
“Coming Home,” performed by Saigon Kick, music by: Jason Bieler
lyrics by: Matt Kramer, publisher: Love Tribe Music/MCA Music/ASCAP, courtesy of: Third Stone/Atlantic Records
“Moonlight Dream,” performed by Wire Train, lyrics by: Kevin Hunter, music by: Wire Train, publisher: Rambling Blah/Third Stone from Sun Music/Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./BMI, courtesy of: MCA Records
“Fatal Kiss,” performed by Elaine’s Treehouse, written by: Elaine Summers and Daniel Pinnella, publisher: Nitzas Music/Payolla Publishing/Third Stone From The Middle Music/WB Music Corporation/ASCAP
“She’s Got A Hold On Me,” written and performed by: Martin Block, publisher
Blockson Music/Third Stone From The Sun Music/Warner Tamerlane Music/BMI, courtesy of: Third Stone/Atlantic Records
“Eyes,” performed by Kimiko Kasai, written by: Tony Humecke, Kimiko Kasai, Trisha Kelly, publisher: Bad Juke Publishing/BMI, Tony Humecke Music/Kiwi Kid Publishing/ASCAP, courtesy of: Kitty Music
“Welcome To The Real Life,” performed by: Sheryl Crow, written by: Crown/Bromham, publisher: Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./BMI.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Brotherhood
Release Date:
17 May 1991
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 17 May 1991
Production Date:
4 June--August 1990
Copyright Claimant:
Stone Group Pictures
Copyright Date:
6 August 1991
Copyright Number:
PA531914
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
93
Length(in feet):
8,279
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31083
SYNOPSIS

In Mobile, Alabama, police detective Joe Huff inadvertently enters a supermarket during an armed robbery, and singlehandedly subdues the three perpetrators. Despite his achievement, Joe is threatened with disciplinary action for performing his duties while on suspension. In Mississippi, Trouble Owens, a member of a motorcycle gang called “The Brotherhood,” is sentenced by Judge Townsend to forty-five years in prison for murdering a Baptist minister. The following day, Ice Hensley, the gang’s sergeant at arms, kills the judge by planting a bomb in his fishing boat. At a secret meeting with Frank Cunningham of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Joe is asked to infiltrate The Brotherhood, and threatened with an extended suspension if he refuses. The detective’s annoyance is compounded when Cunningham teams him with an inexperienced agent named Lance Dockery. The next evening, Joe and Lance arrive at a Mississippi nightclub, one of six owned by the Brotherhood, with a staff of female dancers who sell methamphetamine to the truck-driver clientele. Joe notices Ice Hensley among the patrons, and introduces himself by instigating a fight. However, before the first blow is struck, Ice goes to the defense of a dancer, who is being harassed by a group of disgruntled truck drivers. Joe joins Ice and his comrade, Gut, in the ensuing brawl, identifying himself as “John Stone.” Although Ice resents Joe’s assistance, Gut shows his gratitude by inviting the detective to a Brotherhood rally the following weekend. At the rally, Joe defeats the gang’s strongest man in a wrestling match, and wins a motorcycle race against Ice. Hoping to recruit Joe, gang president Chains Cooper offers him a sexual encounter with his girl friend, Nancy, as incentive. ... +


In Mobile, Alabama, police detective Joe Huff inadvertently enters a supermarket during an armed robbery, and singlehandedly subdues the three perpetrators. Despite his achievement, Joe is threatened with disciplinary action for performing his duties while on suspension. In Mississippi, Trouble Owens, a member of a motorcycle gang called “The Brotherhood,” is sentenced by Judge Townsend to forty-five years in prison for murdering a Baptist minister. The following day, Ice Hensley, the gang’s sergeant at arms, kills the judge by planting a bomb in his fishing boat. At a secret meeting with Frank Cunningham of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Joe is asked to infiltrate The Brotherhood, and threatened with an extended suspension if he refuses. The detective’s annoyance is compounded when Cunningham teams him with an inexperienced agent named Lance Dockery. The next evening, Joe and Lance arrive at a Mississippi nightclub, one of six owned by the Brotherhood, with a staff of female dancers who sell methamphetamine to the truck-driver clientele. Joe notices Ice Hensley among the patrons, and introduces himself by instigating a fight. However, before the first blow is struck, Ice goes to the defense of a dancer, who is being harassed by a group of disgruntled truck drivers. Joe joins Ice and his comrade, Gut, in the ensuing brawl, identifying himself as “John Stone.” Although Ice resents Joe’s assistance, Gut shows his gratitude by inviting the detective to a Brotherhood rally the following weekend. At the rally, Joe defeats the gang’s strongest man in a wrestling match, and wins a motorcycle race against Ice. Hoping to recruit Joe, gang president Chains Cooper offers him a sexual encounter with his girl friend, Nancy, as incentive. Joe refuses Nancy’s advances, and questions why Chains would share such a beautiful woman with other men. At Brotherhood headquarters, Chains and Ice are angered by a television broadcast, in which district attorney and gubernatorial candidate Brent “Whip” Whipperton promises a tougher sentence for Trouble Owens and an end to the gang’s reign of terror. Joe presents Chains with a bulletproof vest and is invited to join the Brotherhood. His first task is to kill a Bolivian drug dealer who encroached on the gang’s territory, and return with the man’s tattooed ear as proof. Joe arrests the Bolivian and arranges his deportation, then commissions a tattoo artist to duplicate the dealer’s spider-web design on the ear of a cadaver. Joe’s next assignment is to assist Nancy and gang member Tool in collecting protection money from local businesses. While they are gone, Chains telephones Sharon, a Brotherhood ally employed by the state police, asking her to research “John Stone.” While making their collections, the gang members encounter Mafia boss Domicci and his henchmen, who steal $400 from Nancy and critically injure Tool with a hand grenade. When Joe retaliates, Domicci holds him at gunpoint, warning that he will not tolerate competition from the Brotherhood. Before returning to gang headquarters, Joe replaces the stolen money, quelling Nancy’s fear of being punished by Chains. Hoping to determine a link between the Brotherhood and organized crime, Joe asks for Chains’s assistance in the sale of a truckload of phenyl-2-propanone, known as “P2P,” a chemical used in the synthesis of methamphetamine. Chains offers to arrange a deal with the Mafia in which Domicci promises no interference. Joe and Chains meet with two mafiosi at a restaurant and present them with a motorcycle helmet containing Domicci’s severed head. Unfazed, the mobsters agree to buy the P2P for $50,000 per barrel. While Chains and Ice discuss plans to assassinate Brent Whipperton, Cunningham orders Joe to arrest Chains for running a protection racket. Joe refuses, claiming it would be better to wait for the P2P deal and arrest the entire gang and several mafiosi, with Nancy as a witness for the prosecution. Cunningham complies, promising to secure a truckload of P2P for the operation. Later, Brotherhood members murder two National Guardsmen and deliver their bodies to Whipperton, with a photograph of the district attorney crossed out in blood. Both Nancy and Gut are outraged by the murders, but when Gut attempts to quit the gang, Chains forces one of his hands into the rotating rear wheel of a motorcycle. That evening, Nancy plans to escape the gang, and advises Joe to do the same, but he convinces her to stay because Chains would have her killed. Joe intends to leave once the P2P sale is complete, and promises to take her with him. The following afternoon, Joe’s lunch with Nancy is interrupted by a summons from Cunningham. Ice follows Joe to the meeting and opens fire. Joe leads him on a high-speed motorcycle chase, ending with Ice’s death in a collision with an automobile. Nancy returns to gang headquarters and intercepts a telephone message from Sharon, revealing “John Stone” to be Joe Huff. When Nancy confronts Joe, he admits to using an alias, but denies being a police officer. Cunningham delivers the promised shipment of P2P, and after Joe and Nancy board the truck, Chains leads a motorcycle escort to their rendezvous with the mafiosi. Joe admits to being a police officer and promises Nancy immunity for her cooperation, while all others at the scene will be arrested by federal agents. However, Chains distrusts Joe and conspires with the mobsters to meet at a different location. After the mafiosi commandeer the truck, Joe rides alongside on his motorcycle and fires at the coupling, causing the trailer to break free, crash into a gasoline station, and burst into flames. Joe returns to Brotherhood headquarters the next day and discovers a military helicopter, purchased by gang member A.W.O.L., a deserter from the United States Army. The detective is brought before Chains, who has learned his true identity from the Bolivian. Chains kills the drug dealer and Nancy, but saves Joe for the rescue of Trouble Owens. In the morning, Owens is brought before the state supreme court in the capitol building. Chains enters the courtroom disguised as a priest, while outside, Joe is held under guard in the helicopter with a time bomb strapped to his body, and A.W.O.L. at the controls. Joe breaks free and pushes his guard overboard, along with the bomb. When Trouble Owens is sentenced to death, Chains opens fire, killing the judges, District Attorney Whipperton, and several spectators. As a battle rages between National Guardsmen and Brotherhood members, Chains radios A.W.O.L. requesting assistance. Joe forces A.W.O.L. to land on the roof, enabling the detective to enter the capitol through the glass skylight. Finding a discarded weapon, Joe dispatches several gang members, including Trouble Owen. Gut is horrified by the carnage, and killed by his comrade, Mudfish, for collaborating with Joe. The detective kills Mudfish, then shoots a motorcyclist speeding toward him in the hallway. The runaway motorcycle crashes through the window, and explodes on impact with A.W.O.L.’s helicopter. With no one left to defend him, Chains is taken into custody. After Joe surrenders his weapon to Cunningham, Chains grabs a policeman’s gun, but is shot to death by Lance Dockery before he is able to fire. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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