Full page view
HISTORY

The film is the third entry in the Rambo series, starting with 1982’s First Blood (see entry), and followed by Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985, see entry). In 2008, a fourth film, Rambo (see entry) was released.
       A year after the release of Rambo: First Blood Part II, a 12 May 1986 HR brief announced that a sequel would begin as early as Oct-Nov 1987 at Carolco Pictures. Two months later, the 14 Jul 1986 HR reported that the film had an anticipated budget of $30 million, and screenwriter Harry Kleiner was hired to write the script. The 24 Aug 1986 LAT announced that Russell Mulcahy would direct. Nearly a year passed, and distributor Tri-Star Pictures predicted a 4 Jul 1987 release date, but the 14 Jan 1987 HR stated that the production schedule had not been set, and the release was pushed back to Thanksgiving 1987.
       An item in the 23 Jul 1986 HR noted that England was considered for filming, but Guaymas, Mexico, was chosen as the primary location. Although principal photography was set to begin on 7 Apr 1987, the 12 Mar 1987 LAT and 13 Mar 1987 HR reported that production had been halted. Kathryn Linclau, vice president of marketing with Carolco Pictures, told the 18 Mar 1987 Var that filming in Guaymas was “unworkable,” and a 16 Mar 1987 LAT brief reported that filming may be moved to the U.S. At that time, actor Sylvester Stallone ... More Less

The film is the third entry in the Rambo series, starting with 1982’s First Blood (see entry), and followed by Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985, see entry). In 2008, a fourth film, Rambo (see entry) was released.
       A year after the release of Rambo: First Blood Part II, a 12 May 1986 HR brief announced that a sequel would begin as early as Oct-Nov 1987 at Carolco Pictures. Two months later, the 14 Jul 1986 HR reported that the film had an anticipated budget of $30 million, and screenwriter Harry Kleiner was hired to write the script. The 24 Aug 1986 LAT announced that Russell Mulcahy would direct. Nearly a year passed, and distributor Tri-Star Pictures predicted a 4 Jul 1987 release date, but the 14 Jan 1987 HR stated that the production schedule had not been set, and the release was pushed back to Thanksgiving 1987.
       An item in the 23 Jul 1986 HR noted that England was considered for filming, but Guaymas, Mexico, was chosen as the primary location. Although principal photography was set to begin on 7 Apr 1987, the 12 Mar 1987 LAT and 13 Mar 1987 HR reported that production had been halted. Kathryn Linclau, vice president of marketing with Carolco Pictures, told the 18 Mar 1987 Var that filming in Guaymas was “unworkable,” and a 16 Mar 1987 LAT brief reported that filming may be moved to the U.S. At that time, actor Sylvester Stallone was re-writing the script in an effort to make a “more realistic and less of a cartoon figure” of the character “John Rambo.” Screenwriter Harry Kleiner is not credited onscreen. The following month, the 27 Apr 1987 HR and 29 Apr 1987 Var reported that production would be moved to either Morocco or Israel, for a summer 1988 date.
       Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that principal photography began on 30 Aug 1987 in Israel, with locations including the Dead Sea area, Jaffa, Eliat, and Jerusalem. Additional filming locations included Bangkok, Thailand; Chiang Mai, Thailand; and the area surrounding Yuma, AZ.
       A 30 Aug 1987 LAT production chart listed James D. Brubaker as producer, but he is not credited onscreen. The 15 Sep 1987 HR noted that actors Avi Kedar, Haim Girafi and Sybil Maas were to appear on film. However, none are credited onscreen. In addition, the 17 Aug 1987 DV reported that actor Marlon Brando had been approached for the film, but he declined the role.
       As filming began, the 27 Sep 1987 LAT noted that the film’s budget had increased to approximately $45 million, particularly due to Sylvester Stallone’s $16 million fee. However, Stallone waived the money “in favor of a percentage of the film’s gross.”
       During production in Israel, the 17 Sep 1987 HR reported that both director Russell Mulcahy and director of photography Ric Waite were removed from production. Second unit director Peter MacDonald replaced Mulcahy, and cinematographer David Gurfinkel replaced Waite. Neither Mulcahy nor Waite are credited onscreen, and Gurfinkel was later succeeded by John Stanier. Although costume designer Richard La Motte, property master Sam Moore, and unit publicist Tom Gray were noted as being fired from the picture, the 12 Oct 1987 LAT reported that all three stayed with the production, but Gurfinkel was fired from the production, and is not credited onscreen. A month later, the 17 Nov 1987 HR stated that film editors David Berlazky and Tom Berlazky were also fired. They are not credited onscreen.
       After filming ended in Israel, reports in the 31 Dec 1987 DV and 31 Dec 1987 LAT noted that Golan & Globus Studios in Tel-Aviv accused Carolco Pictures of issuing $200,000 worth of bad checks in relation to the film. The 14 Jan 1988 DV reported that a court hearing in Tel-Aviv was scheduled for 25 Jan 1988, but the outcome has not been determined.
       Production notes state that after moving from Thailand to Yuma, production concluded on 28 Jan 1988. Preceding the film’s release, reports of the final budget varied: The 29 Jan 1988 LAT estimated $50 million, while the 2 May 1988 DV estimated $60 million, and the 9 May 1988 LAHExam reported $63 million.
       Following the picture’s 25 May 1988 release, the 1 Jun 1988 LAT stated that it grossed $16.7 million at the box-office after four days. As reported in the 1 Jun 1988 HR, a number of anti-war groups objected to the violence portrayed onscreen, and protested in front of theaters in Los Angeles, CA, Champaign, IL, and Seattle, WA. According to the 3 Jun 1988 LAT, the National Coalition of Television Violence (NCTV) reported that the film showed “245 separate acts of violence.” Two weeks later, the 14 Jun 1988 LAT reported that social activist Jerry Rubin had started his own protest in front of the Coronet Theater in Westwood, CA, by fasting for sixty-three days, with each day representing a $1 million of the film’s reported cost. On 13 Aug 1988, Rubin ended his fast and “delivered a giant peace-symbol pizza” to Stallone’s home in Malibu, CA, as noted in an article for the 14 Aug 1988 LAT.
       The 5 Jan 1989 LAT reported that the picture’s domestic gross was approximately $54 million.
       The film marked the feature directorial debut of Peter MacDonald.
       End credits are preceded by the statement: “This film is dedicated to the gallant people of Afghanistan.” End credits are followed by the statement: “A Special Thanks To: Ray Herbeck, Jr., Re-Enactor Supervisor, And To All The Cavalry Divisions of The Re-Enactors Unit Under His Supervision; Directors Guild of America, Inc.; Billy Curtis; Mr. Daniel Santos, U.S. Dept. of State; Mr. William D. Livingstone, Press Secretary, Sen. Pete Wilson; Mr. Bill Earl, Director, Imports Branch, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms; Hon. M. Peter McPherson, Deputy Secretary of The Treasury; Hon. Philip Hughes, Deputy Asst. Secretary for Technology Transfer and Control. And Especially: Senator Pete Wilson, United States Senate; The Quechan Tribe for the use of The Fort Yuma Indian Reservation in California; United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, California Desert District, Public Lands U.S.A. - Use, Share And Appreciate; The California Film Commission. And in Yuma, Arizona: Sheriff John Phipps, Yuma County Sheriff Dept.; Capt. Nick Castello; John White, Deputy County Attorney; Kelly Ryan, American Humane Association.”
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Aug 1987
p. 3.
Daily Variety
31 Dec 1987
p. 1, 9.
Daily Variety
14 Jan 1988
p. 2, 66.
Daily Variety
2 May 1988
p. 1, 26.
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 1987
p. 1, 93.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Apr 1987
p. 1, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 1987
p. 1, 9.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 1987.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 1988
p. 3, 24.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 1988.
---
LAHExam
9 May 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
24 Aug 1986
Calendar p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
12 Mar 1987
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
16 Mar 1987
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
30 Aug 1987
Calendar, p. 37.
Los Angeles Times
27 Sep 1987
Calendar, p. 26.
Los Angeles Times
12 Oct 1987
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
31 Dec 1987
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
29 Jan 1988
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
25 May 1988
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jun 1988
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
3 Jun 1988
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
14 Jun 1988
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
14 Aug 1988
Metro, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
5 Jan 1989
Calendar, p. 1.
New York Times
25 May 1988
Section C, p. 15.
Variety
18 Mar 1987
p. 7.
Variety
29 Apr 1987
p. 5, 26.
Variety
25 May 1988
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Mario Kassar and Andrew Vajna Presents
A Carolco Production
A Tri-Star Release
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
Unit prod mgr, Israel unit
Unit prod mgr, Israel unit
Unit prod mgr, Israel unit
1st asst dir, Israel unit
1st asst dir, Israel unit
2d asst dir, Israel unit
2d asst dir, Israel unit
2d asst dir, Israel unit
2d asst dir, Israel unit
Dir, 2d unit
Dir, 2d unit
Unit prod mgr, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
Unit prod mgr, Thailand unit
Asst dir, Thailand unit
Asst dir, Thailand unit
Unit prod mgr, Arizona unit
1st asst dir, Arizona unit
2d asst dir, Arizona unit
2d asst dir, Arizona unit
2d 2d asst dir, Arizona unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op, Israel unit
Cam op, Israel unit
Cam op, Israel unit
Cam op, Israel unit
Cam op, Israel unit
Cam op, Israel unit
Focus puller, Israel unit
Focus puller, Israel unit
Focus puller, Israel unit
Focus puller, Israel unit
Cam asst, Israel unit
Cam tech, Israel unit
Cam tech, Israel unit
Chapman crane, Israel unit
Video tech, Israel unit
Elec gaffer, Israel unit
Elec gaffer, Israel unit
Elec best boy, Israel unit
Best boy grip, Israel unit
Best boy grip, Israel unit
Key grip, Israel unit
Still photog, Israel unit
Still photog, Israel unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Cam op, Thailand unit
Cam asst, Thailand unit
Cam asst, Thailand unit
Focus puller, Thailand unit
Focus puller, Thailand unit
Rigging, Thailand unit
Key grip, Thailand unit
Grip, Thailand unit
Grip, Thailand unit
Grip, Thailand unit
Cam op, Arizona unit
Cam op, Arizona unit
Cam op, Arizona unit
Steadicam op, Arizona unit
Asst cam op, Arizona unit
Asst cam op, Arizona unit
Asst cam op, Arizona unit
Asst cam op, Arizona unit
Asst cam op, Arizona unit
Cam loader, Arizona unit
Video tech, Arizona unit
Video tech, Arizona unit
Rigging gaffer, Arizona unit
Elec gaffer, Arizona unit
Elec best boy, Arizona unit
Key grip, Arizona unit
2d grip, Arizona unit
Dolly grip, Arizona unit
Chapman crane driver, Arizona unit
Still photog, Arizona unit
Helicopter cam, Arizona unit
Tyler cam mount tech, Arizona unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, Israel unit
Art dir, Israel unit
Art dir, Israel unit
Art consultant, Israel unit
Draftsperson, Israel unit
Storyboard, Israel unit
Storyboard, Israel unit
Prod des, Thailand unit
Art dir, Thailand unit
Asst art dir, Thailand unit
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Film ed, Israel unit
Post prod supv, Israel unit
Post prod coord, Israel unit
Film ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Asst ed, Israel unit
Apprentice ed, Israel unit
Apprentice ed, Israel unit
Apprentice ed, Israel unit
Apprentice ed, Israel unit
Apprentice ed, Israel unit
SET DECORATORS
Set dec, Israel unit
Asst set dec, Israel unit
Asst set dec, Israel unit
Set dresser, Israel unit
Prop master, Israel unit
Prop, Israel unit
Prop, Israel unit
Const coord, Israel unit
Const mgr, Israel unit
Set dec, Arizona unit
Leadman, Arizona unit
Prop master, Arizona unit
Greensman, Arizona unit
COSTUMES
Cost des, Israel unit
Key costumer, Arizona unit
MUSIC
Mus ed, Israel unit
Mus rec consultant, Israel unit
Orch, Israel unit
Orch, Israel unit
SOUND
Sd mixer, Israel unit
Sd mixer, Israel unit
Boom op, Israel unit
Boom op, Israel unit
Supv sd ed, Israel unit
Sd ed, Israel unit
Sd ed, Israel unit
Sd ed, Israel unit
Sd ed, Israel unit
Sd ed, Israel unit
Sd ed, Israel unit
ADR ed, Israel unit
ADR ed, Israel unit
ADR ed, Israel unit
Asst sd ed, Israel unit
Asst sd ed, Israel unit
Asst sd ed, Israel unit
Foley artist, Israel unit
Foley artist, Israel unit
Foley artist, Israel unit
Re-rec mixer, Israel unit
Re-rec mixer, Israel unit
Re-rec mixer, Israel unit
Sd re-rec, Israel unit
Boom op, Arizona unit
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv, Israel unit
Spec eff, Israel unit
Spec eff, Israel unit
Spec eff, Israel unit
Spec eff, Israel unit
Spec eff, Israel unit
Spec eff, Israel unit
Spec eff, Israel unit
Spec visual eff supv, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Art dir, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Model shop supv, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Assoc prod, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Assoc prod, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Assoc prod, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Visual eff cam, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Prod coord, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Stage coord, Introvision Systems, Inc.
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup des, Israel unit
Makeup artist, Israel unit
Makeup asst, Israel unit
Hairstylist, Israel unit
Hairstylist, Thailand unit
Makeup artist, Arizona unit
Makeup artist, Arizona unit
Hairstylist, Arizona unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod exec, Israel unit
Prod assoc, Israel unit
Prod asst, Israel unit
Projection tech, Israel unit
Loc auditor, Israel unit
Prod accountant, Israel unit
Prod accountant, Israel unit
Prod accountant, Israel unit
Prod accountant, Israel unit
Asst accountant, Israel unit
Asst accountant, Israel unit
Asst accountant, Israel unit
Loc mgr, Israel unit
Loc mgr, Israel unit
Scr supv, Israel unit
Unit pub, Israel unit
Casting (London), Israel unit
Casting (Israel), Israel unit
Addl casting, Israel unit
Afghanistan adv, Israel unit
Transportation coord, Israel unit
Personal transportation mgr, Israel unit
Action vehicles, Israel unit
Armorer, Israel unit
Armorer, Israel unit
Armorer, Israel unit
Wrangler coord, Israel unit
Wrangler coord, Israel unit
Wrangler coord, Israel unit
Camp mgr, Israel unit
Prod coord, Israel unit
Prod coord, Israel unit
Prod coord, Israel unit
Exec asst, Israel unit
Exec secy, Israel unit
Asst to exec prod, Israel unit
Asst to Buzz Feitshans, Israel unit
Asst to Buzz Feitshans, Israel unit
Prod secy, Israel unit
Prod secy, Israel unit
Prod secy, Israel unit
Prod secy, Israel unit
Prod secy, Israel unit
Mr. Stallone's trainer, Israel unit
Security, Israel unit
Security, Ronin Agency, Israel unit
Security, Ronin Agency, Israel unit
Security, Ronin Agency, Israel unit
Security, Ronin Agency, Israel unit
Helicopter coord, 2d unit
Puma pilot, 2d unit
Gazelle pilot, 2d unit
Exec coord, Thailand unit
Prod coord, Thailand unit
Prod accountant, Thailand unit
Addl casting, Thailand unit
Transportation capt, Thailand unit
Prod secy, Thailand unit
Prod secy, Thailand unit
Loc mgr, Arizona unit
Loc prod asst, Arizona unit
Scr supv, Arizona unit
Extras casting, Arizona unit
Extras casting, Arizona unit
Transportation coord, Arizona unit
Prod coord, Arizona unit
Asst prod coord, Arizona unit
Prod secy, Arizona unit
Prod asst, Arizona unit
Prod asst, Arizona unit
Prod office asst, Arizona unit
Armor man, Arizona unit
Helicopter pilot/Jet Ranger, Arizona unit
Helicopter pilot/Gazelle, Arizona unit
Helicopter coord, Arizona unit
Prod financing provided by
Prod financing provided by
Weapons furnished by
Weapons serviced by
Bow des specially for "RAMBO® III" by
Kentucky knifesmith
Military vehicles in the U.S. provided by
Helicopter modifications by
Helicopter modifications by Bill Yoak
Puma helicopter furnished by
Gazelle helicopters furnished by (Israel)
Gazelle helicopters furnished by (U.S.)
Ball Jet Ranger helicopters furnished by (Israel)
Ball Jet Ranger helicopters furnished by (U.S.)
Digital keyboards by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Utility stuntman
Utility stuntman
Utility stuntman
Utility stuntman
Arizona stunt horse
Arizona stunt horse
Arizona stunt horse
California boss wrangler
Stick fight coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by David Morrell.
AUTHOR
SONGS
“He Ain’t Heavy … He’s My Brother,” Bob Russell & Bobby Scott, Harrison Music Corp. (ASCAP), Jenny Music, Inc. (ASCAP), performed by Bill Medley (courtesy of Voss Records), produced by Giorgio Moroder.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Titles:
First Blood III
Rambo: Part III
Rambo: First Blood Part III
Rambo 3
Release Date:
25 May 1988
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 May 1988
Production Date:
30 August 1987 - 28 January 1988
Copyright Claimant:
Carolco Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
21 June 1988
Copyright Number:
PA368369
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo® SR Spectral Recording in selected theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Techicolor®
Duration(in mins):
104
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
29127
SYNOPSIS

Residing at a Buddhist monastery in Thailand, John Rambo is visited by Colonel Samuel Trautman, his former commander, and Robert Griggs, a U.S. embassy field officer. Griggs informs Rambo that Soviet invaders have killed over two million civilians in Afghanistan, particularly in a border-region controlled by Colonel Zaysen. Trautman announces he is going on a mission to a nearby village, and asks Rambo to accompany him. However, Rambo insists his war is over and declines. Later, Griggs returns to report that the operation was ambushed, and Zaysen took Trautman hostage. Wanting to save his friend, Rambo agrees to go on an unofficial rescue mission. With Griggs’s assistance, Rambo travels to Peshawar, Pakistan, and meets Mousa, an arms dealer. After Rambo obtains weapons and explosives, Mousa agrees to take him to the Afghan village near Zaysen’s fortress. However, one of Mousa’s employees overhears their plans and informs Zaysen. While Mousa leads Rambo to the village through mountain caves, Zaysen and his underling, Kourov, torture Trautman. Arriving at the village, Rambo meets the tribal leader, Masoud, along with other rebel fighters and asks for assistance. As the men discuss Rambo’s request, Zaysen and his forces appear in helicopters and attack the village. Rambo runs to a gun turret and destroys one helicopter, but Zaysen escapes and returns to the fortress. Later, Masoud suggests that Rambo travel with the surviving villagers to the border, but Rambo refuses to leave and plans to infiltrate the fortress. Mousa leads him to the minefield surrounding the fortress, as a young rebel fighter named Hamid follows them. Inside, Mousa and Hamid ... +


Residing at a Buddhist monastery in Thailand, John Rambo is visited by Colonel Samuel Trautman, his former commander, and Robert Griggs, a U.S. embassy field officer. Griggs informs Rambo that Soviet invaders have killed over two million civilians in Afghanistan, particularly in a border-region controlled by Colonel Zaysen. Trautman announces he is going on a mission to a nearby village, and asks Rambo to accompany him. However, Rambo insists his war is over and declines. Later, Griggs returns to report that the operation was ambushed, and Zaysen took Trautman hostage. Wanting to save his friend, Rambo agrees to go on an unofficial rescue mission. With Griggs’s assistance, Rambo travels to Peshawar, Pakistan, and meets Mousa, an arms dealer. After Rambo obtains weapons and explosives, Mousa agrees to take him to the Afghan village near Zaysen’s fortress. However, one of Mousa’s employees overhears their plans and informs Zaysen. While Mousa leads Rambo to the village through mountain caves, Zaysen and his underling, Kourov, torture Trautman. Arriving at the village, Rambo meets the tribal leader, Masoud, along with other rebel fighters and asks for assistance. As the men discuss Rambo’s request, Zaysen and his forces appear in helicopters and attack the village. Rambo runs to a gun turret and destroys one helicopter, but Zaysen escapes and returns to the fortress. Later, Masoud suggests that Rambo travel with the surviving villagers to the border, but Rambo refuses to leave and plans to infiltrate the fortress. Mousa leads him to the minefield surrounding the fortress, as a young rebel fighter named Hamid follows them. Inside, Mousa and Hamid place explosives as Rambo searches for Trautman. However, Soviet soldiers open fire, injuring Rambo and Hamid. While the explosives detonate, Rambo orders Mousa to take Hamid to safety while he goes back for his friend. Returning to the fortress, Rambo rescues Trautman as he is being tortured and frees the other prisoners. Stealing a helicopter, Rambo attempts to escape, but he is forced to land due to gunfire damages. Rambo and Trautman walk to the border, and pursued by Zaysen in his helicopter. Hiding in mountain caves, Rambo and Trautman evade the Soviet, but Kourov finds them. However, Rambo pushes Kourov into a cave and kills him with a hand grenade. As Rambo and Trautman arrive at the border, Zaysen and his forces surround them. Masoud and Afghan rebels arrive within seconds and attack the Soviets. Meanwhile, Zaysen flies his helicopter low overhead. Rambo commandeers a tank and rams it into the helicopter, killing Zaysen. Victorious, Rambo and Trautman leave Afghanistan, bidding farewell to Mousa and Hamid. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.