Consenting Adults (1992)

R | 99 mins | Drama | 16 October 1992

Director:

Alan J. Pakula

Writer:

Matthew Chapman

Cinematographer:

Stephen Goldblatt

Editor:

Sam O'Steen

Production Designer:

Carol Spier

Production Companies:

Hollywood Pictures , Touchwood Pacific Partners I
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HISTORY

Although the role of "Trudy Seaton" is credited to Michelle Moore in end credits, the studio's final draft credits, dated 24 Sep 1992, include a handwritten correction in which the name "Michelle" is crossed out and substituted with "Melissa."
       The 16 Oct 1991 DV reported that Alan J. Pakula was on the verge of signing a deal with Hollywood Pictures to direct the film, budgeted at $18 million. An item in the 21 Apr 1992 DV noted that the project had been in development for three years.
       The "Films in Preproduction" listing in the 29 Oct 1991 HR projected a start date of 20 Jan 1992. However, on 14 Jan 1992, HR announced the 27 Jan 1992 start of principal photography. Production notes in AMPAS library files state that production began 26 Jan 1992 in Atlanta, GA, and included Sandy Springs, Alpharetta, Sweet Bottom Plantation in Duluth, a fishing lodge in Peachtree City, Gwinnett County Detention Center, and various Atlanta jazz clubs among the Georgia locations. In addition, some interior sets were built on stages in Covington and Senoia, GA. South Carolina locations included Rice Hope Plantation, the banks of the Cooper River in Moncks Corner, and Sullivan's Island, all near the city of Charleston. A full-page advertisement in the 23 Jun 1992 HR announced the completion of principal photography.
       According to the 26 Jun 1992 LAT, Hollywood Pictures decided to hold the film for a Christmas season opening instead of the planned Sep 1992 release. Regardless, the film went into wide release on 16 Oct 1992. The article also mentioned that the picture ... More Less

Although the role of "Trudy Seaton" is credited to Michelle Moore in end credits, the studio's final draft credits, dated 24 Sep 1992, include a handwritten correction in which the name "Michelle" is crossed out and substituted with "Melissa."
       The 16 Oct 1991 DV reported that Alan J. Pakula was on the verge of signing a deal with Hollywood Pictures to direct the film, budgeted at $18 million. An item in the 21 Apr 1992 DV noted that the project had been in development for three years.
       The "Films in Preproduction" listing in the 29 Oct 1991 HR projected a start date of 20 Jan 1992. However, on 14 Jan 1992, HR announced the 27 Jan 1992 start of principal photography. Production notes in AMPAS library files state that production began 26 Jan 1992 in Atlanta, GA, and included Sandy Springs, Alpharetta, Sweet Bottom Plantation in Duluth, a fishing lodge in Peachtree City, Gwinnett County Detention Center, and various Atlanta jazz clubs among the Georgia locations. In addition, some interior sets were built on stages in Covington and Senoia, GA. South Carolina locations included Rice Hope Plantation, the banks of the Cooper River in Moncks Corner, and Sullivan's Island, all near the city of Charleston. A full-page advertisement in the 23 Jun 1992 HR announced the completion of principal photography.
       According to the 26 Jun 1992 LAT, Hollywood Pictures decided to hold the film for a Christmas season opening instead of the planned Sep 1992 release. Regardless, the film went into wide release on 16 Oct 1992. The article also mentioned that the picture was the first for which Hollywood’s parent company, Walt Disney Studios, placed two-page color advertisements in industry trade magazines. The advertising poster, which featured a reclining semi-nude blonde woman seen from the back, was prevented from being displayed on city buses in Seattle, WA, Denver, CO, and Minneapolis, MN, as stated in the 29 Sep 1992 DV. The 5 Oct 1992 LAT reported that selectmen in Norwood, MA, also voted to ban billboards for the film.
       The film was cut by ten minutes prior to release, as evidenced by a press release, dated 8 Oct 1992, which states the running time as 109 minutes. Studio-issued music cue sheets, dated 29 Oct 1992, show a running time of ninety-nine minutes. Among the eliminated footage was a scene at the fishing lodge in Peachtree City, which is discussed in the dialogue, even though it does not appear on screen.
       Critical reaction was generally negative, exemplified by the 16 Oct 1992 HR, which declared, "Good direction takes on a bad script and the script wins."
       The following acknowledgment appears in end credits: "The Producers Wish to Extend Special Thanks to Georgia Film Commission."
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Oct 1991.
---
Daily Variety
21 Apr 1992.
---
Daily Variety
29 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Oct 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 1992
p. 6.
LA Reader
16 Oct 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Jun 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
5 Oct 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Oct 1992
p. 1.
New York Times
16 Oct 1992
p. 14.
Variety
19 Oct 1992
p. 159.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Hollywood Pictures presents
In Association With Touchwood Pacific Partners I
A David Permut Production
An Alan J. Pakula Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Gaffer
Elec best boy
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Rigging key grip
Loc lighting & grip equip supplied by
Panavision cam equip supplied by
Panavision cam equip supplied by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set des
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Scenic chargeman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des
Cost supv
Women's key cost
Men's key cost
Men's key cost
MUSIC
Mus/Score cond by
Mus supv
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Orch contractor
Score mixed at
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman/Video assist
Supv sd ed
Dialogue ed
Dialogue ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR supv
Asst ADR ed
Foley supv
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Sd des & Foley rec
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Cam scenic
Spec eff coord
Titles and opticals
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to Mr. Pakula
Asst to Mr. Pakula, Atlanta
Asst to Pieter Jan Brugge
Unit pub
Transportation coord
LA transportation capt
LA transportation capt
Local transportation capt
Charleston loc coord
Asst loc mgr
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Craft service
First aid
Atlanta casting by
New York casting assoc
Extras casting coord & Addl casting Charleston
Loc catering by
Helicopter pilot
STAND INS
Stunt coord/Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Dailies supv by
Produced and distributed on
SOURCES
SONGS
"No Headstone On My Grave," words and music by Charlie Rich, performed by Q Rose
"Looking Back," words and music by Clyde Otis, Brook Benton and Belford Hendricks, performed by Q Rose
"I'm Too Far Gone To Turn Around," words and music by Clyde Otis and Belford Hendricks, performed by Q Rose
+
SONGS
"No Headstone On My Grave," words and music by Charlie Rich, performed by Q Rose
"Looking Back," words and music by Clyde Otis, Brook Benton and Belford Hendricks, performed by Q Rose
"I'm Too Far Gone To Turn Around," words and music by Clyde Otis and Belford Hendricks, performed by Q Rose
"Cheek To Cheek," words and music by Irving Berlin, performed by Kevin Spacey
"I Wanna Piece Of The Party," words and music by Joe Mulherin
"TBD Shuffle," words and music by Joe Mulherin
"Blues Connection," words and music by Joe Mulherin
"The Night Has Many Eyes," words and music by Joe Mulherin
"As Time Goes By," written by Herman Hupfeld, courtesy of Turner Entertainment Co.
+
PERFORMERS
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 October 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 16 October 1992
New York opening: week of 16 October 1992
Production Date:
26 January--late spring 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Hollywood Pictures Company, an accepted alt. of the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
26 October 1992
Copyright Number:
PA585799
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex® cameras by Panavision®; Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
99
Length(in feet):
8,909
Length(in reels):
10
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32052
SYNOPSIS

Commercial jingle writer Richard Parker and his wife, Priscilla, are invited to dinner by their new neighbors, Eddy and Kay Otis. At dinner, Eddy shares his philosophy that one needs a lot of money “pumping through the system” to be able to enjoy life to the fullest. When asked how to make that happen, he suggests investing in drug and alcohol rehabilitation clinics. While Eddy and Priscilla chat, Kay joins Richard at the piano, delighting him with her singing. After taking the Parkers on a weekend trip to South Carolina in his private jet, Eddy offers Richard $25,000 to pay off his outstanding debts. Sometime later, Richard accidentally drives his car into Eddy, who feigns severe neck and back injury. Eddy receives a $30,000 insurance settlement and gives $25,000 to the Parkers. As their friendship grows, Eddy proposes that he and Richard swap wives for a night, as the women would likely not care or know the difference. Richard refuses, and following a heated exchange, the men terminate their friendship. While Eddy and Kay host a Christmas party, Priscilla complains to Richard that something is lacking in their marriage now that the Otises are out of their lives. Although Richard regrets accepting the insurance money, Priscilla berates her husband for his complacency, and commends Eddy for his sense of adventure. Richard joins Eddy and his guests as they sing Christmas carols, and the Otises renew their friendship with the Parkers. Richard eventually agrees to swap wives with Eddy, but is plagued by guilt afterward. Following his morning jog, he notices police cars gathered outside the Otis home. Richard soon discovers that Kay has been bludgeoned to death with a ... +


Commercial jingle writer Richard Parker and his wife, Priscilla, are invited to dinner by their new neighbors, Eddy and Kay Otis. At dinner, Eddy shares his philosophy that one needs a lot of money “pumping through the system” to be able to enjoy life to the fullest. When asked how to make that happen, he suggests investing in drug and alcohol rehabilitation clinics. While Eddy and Priscilla chat, Kay joins Richard at the piano, delighting him with her singing. After taking the Parkers on a weekend trip to South Carolina in his private jet, Eddy offers Richard $25,000 to pay off his outstanding debts. Sometime later, Richard accidentally drives his car into Eddy, who feigns severe neck and back injury. Eddy receives a $30,000 insurance settlement and gives $25,000 to the Parkers. As their friendship grows, Eddy proposes that he and Richard swap wives for a night, as the women would likely not care or know the difference. Richard refuses, and following a heated exchange, the men terminate their friendship. While Eddy and Kay host a Christmas party, Priscilla complains to Richard that something is lacking in their marriage now that the Otises are out of their lives. Although Richard regrets accepting the insurance money, Priscilla berates her husband for his complacency, and commends Eddy for his sense of adventure. Richard joins Eddy and his guests as they sing Christmas carols, and the Otises renew their friendship with the Parkers. Richard eventually agrees to swap wives with Eddy, but is plagued by guilt afterward. Following his morning jog, he notices police cars gathered outside the Otis home. Richard soon discovers that Kay has been bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat, and Eddy accuses him of the murder. In jail, Richard’s attorney, George Gordon, relates the coroner’s determination that Kay had sex with Richard within half an hour of her death. In addition, Eddy denies any plan to swap wives, claiming he was out of town when the murder occurred. Outraged over these developments and the trauma they have caused the couple’s daughter, Lori Parker, Priscilla files for divorce. Richard is released on bail and returns home for some personal belongings. He notices someone inside the Otis house and enters to find private detective David Duttonville, who is investigating a $1.5 million life insurance claim by Eddy. Duttonville asks Richard for information, explaining he has only one week to find “something solid” to refute the overwhelming evidence in the case. The detective also reveals that Eddy seems to be romantically involved with Priscilla. Later, Richard discovers that Kay is alive and singing under the name Olivia Kamen. Richard questions the staff of the nightclub where she last performed, but they have been unable to locate her. Richard shares the news with a skeptical Duttonville, and suggests exhuming the victim’s body. However, the body was cremated after being identified by both Eddy and a doctor. Richard is almost certain that the physician was Dr. Pettering, who falsified Eddy’s accident claim. He also suggests that Eddy hired someone to substitute for Kay as both Richard’s sex partner and the murder victim. Although neither Duttonville nor attorney George Gordon consider Richard’s story credible, the detective’s investigation reveals that Dr. Pettering was involved in both claims. Furthermore, Pettering partnered with Eddy and Priscilla in opening a rehabilitation clinic. Richard spies on Eddy and Priscilla, and later hides in her car while she is on an errand. After revealing himself to Priscilla, Richard says that Kay is alive and gives her an audiocassette of “Olivia Kamen.” At Richard’s request, Priscilla plays the tape for Eddy that evening. When Priscilla claims she received the cassette by mail, Eddy angrily concludes that Richard sent it. Afterward, Duttonville and Richard learn that Eddy made four telephone calls to Savannah, Georgia, the day he heard the tape. Tracing the number to the hotel where Kay now resides, Richard travels to Savannah and finds Kay singing in a café under her new identity. He follows her to her hotel room, where she reveals that Eddy instructed her to drive his truck to an out-of-town location to establish his alibi. Richard is summoned to the lobby on the pretext that Duttonville wishes to see him. Realizing too late that he has been tricked, Richard races upstairs to find Kay bludgeoned to death, and escapes seconds before police arrive. Eddy returns home from what Priscilla believes was a trip to Atlanta. Later, Priscilla discovers an airline ticket in Eddy’s jacket and absentmindedly places it in her purse. While Richard hides outside their home, police inform the couple of the killing in Savannah, warning that their lives may be in danger as well. Later that night, Priscilla looks at the ticket in her purse and realizes Eddy was in Savannah, not Atlanta. She attempts to escape in Eddy’s absence, but he is at the bedroom door barring her exit. As Richard makes his way toward the house, he discovers Dr. Pettering in Eddy’s car. Richard subdues Pettering, enters the house, and moves quietly upstairs toward the bedroom. Meanwhile, Priscilla is sprawled across the bed as Eddy lies in wait with an Uzi machine gun. Unable to contain his sense of triumph, Eddy whispers to Priscilla that his plan is a success and Richard is his “puppet.” The police will find her dead, presumably beaten by Richard with a baseball bat, and Eddy will kill him in what will appear to be self defense. As Eddy moves toward the stairs, Richard surprises him by crashing through the bedroom window. Following a brief struggle, Eddy corners Richard, but as he is about to fire, Priscilla bludgeons him from behind with a baseball bat. In the aftermath, Richard is cleared of all charges, and the Parker family moves into a new home, isolated from all neighbors. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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