Cool World (1992)

PG-13 | 101 mins | Fantasy, Comedy | 10 July 1992

Director:

Ralph Bakshi

Producer:

Frank Mancuso Jr.

Cinematographer:

John A. Alonzo

Production Designer:

Michael Corenblith

Production Company:

Paramount Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

Director Ralph Bakshi returned to feature film animation with Cool World, after a decade-long hiatus during which he focused on painting. Bakshi’s last film before the hiatus, American Pop (see entry), was released in 1981, one year before Hey Good Lookin’ (1982, see entry), which had been shelved for seven years, as noted in a 6 Jul 1992 LAT article. Bakshi’s departure from Hollywood, and subsequent move to Westchester, NY, came after several box-office failures, including the aforementioned films, and while his adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings (1978, see entry) had been commercially successful, Bakshi reportedly found the experience of making it uninspiring. Bakshi’s return to animation began with a revival of the television cartoon series Mighty Mouse, aired on the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) television network from 1987 to 1988. Bakshi then got the idea to make an animated horror film, and approached producer Frank Mancuso, Jr., who had produced several films in the Friday the 13th series. Mancuso balked at the idea of an animated horror project, but suggested the idea of a protagonist who could not escape his own creations, thus inspiring the storyline for Cool World.
       A 3 Nov 1990 Screen International brief announced that Paramount Pictures Corp. would finance the picture, in which live action elements would be combined with animation, in the vein of Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988, see entry), whose box-office success was often cited as Paramount’s impetus for putting an estimated $28-$30 million behind Bakshi’s venture. In a 19 Feb 1992 ...

More Less

Director Ralph Bakshi returned to feature film animation with Cool World, after a decade-long hiatus during which he focused on painting. Bakshi’s last film before the hiatus, American Pop (see entry), was released in 1981, one year before Hey Good Lookin’ (1982, see entry), which had been shelved for seven years, as noted in a 6 Jul 1992 LAT article. Bakshi’s departure from Hollywood, and subsequent move to Westchester, NY, came after several box-office failures, including the aforementioned films, and while his adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings (1978, see entry) had been commercially successful, Bakshi reportedly found the experience of making it uninspiring. Bakshi’s return to animation began with a revival of the television cartoon series Mighty Mouse, aired on the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) television network from 1987 to 1988. Bakshi then got the idea to make an animated horror film, and approached producer Frank Mancuso, Jr., who had produced several films in the Friday the 13th series. Mancuso balked at the idea of an animated horror project, but suggested the idea of a protagonist who could not escape his own creations, thus inspiring the storyline for Cool World.
       A 3 Nov 1990 Screen International brief announced that Paramount Pictures Corp. would finance the picture, in which live action elements would be combined with animation, in the vein of Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988, see entry), whose box-office success was often cited as Paramount’s impetus for putting an estimated $28-$30 million behind Bakshi’s venture. In a 19 Feb 1992 HR news brief, Bakshi was quoted as saying the support from Paramount was the best he had ever had from a studio. The budget and freedom Paramount allowed him resulted in an international team of 180 animators of Bakshi’s choosing, working in his unassuming, cinderblock animation studio in an industrial section of Burbank, CA. A 5 Jul 1992 NYT article stated that Bakshi’s previous highest budget on a film was $4 million.
       A 25 Jan 1991 Screen International item reported that Gabriel Byrne was set to star, and principal photography would soon begin in Las Vegas, NV. While the 6 May 1991 Var listed a start date of 15 Feb 1991, the 25 Feb 1992 HR stated that production began one month later, on 15 Mar 1991. Three weeks of location filming in Las Vegas was followed by six weeks of filming in Los Angeles, CA, on soundstages. Las Vegas locations included the Union Plaza Hotel and Casino, where Kim Basinger’s stunt double performed a stunt on a balcony railing twenty-one stories above the ground, scaling a pole to the roof of the hotel in a miniskirt and high heels.
       Principal photography concluded 19 Apr 1991. Post-production and animation followed at Bakshi’s Burbank studio. In the 6 Jul 1992 LAT, Bakshi’s animation was said to be done “the old-fashioned way,” without computers. For live-action sequences, Bakshi had animation backgrounds enlarged photographically, and pasted onto wood, in lieu of blue screen backgrounds. The director described this choice as both economical and artistic, noting that the illustrated backgrounds gave actors a sense of place within a scene. However, according to production notes in AMPAS library files, some blue screen backgrounds were used, as was rotoscope and a custom updated multi-plane camera that created layers of depth into which the live action and animation elements could be incorporated. The 5 Jul 1992 NYT stated that the film took a total of two-and-a-half years to complete.
       In an interview in the Jul 1992 issue of Pulse! magazine, Bakshi described the premise of Cool World as a metaphor for the AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) epidemic. The conundrum affecting the human (“noid”) characters, who are not allowed to have sex with cartoons (“doodles”), was meant to reflect relationship problems faced by people in the AIDS generation.
       A 9 - 15 Jul 1992 Hollywood Drama-Logue brief stated that the cartoon version of Kim Basinger’s character, “Holli Would,” was actually based on choreographer and music coordinator Jenine Jennings, who performed as Holli Would in rough, live-action sequences to be overlaid by drawings.
       According to a 26 Jun 1992 WSJ article, Paramount’s marketing department began promoting Cool World a year before its release, by announcing Bakshi’s comeback at comic book and science fiction conventions. In Apr 1992, to attract the interest of high school students, the studio also attended the National Scholastic Press Association’s convention. A “Cool Concert Contest” organized by the studio gave out prizes of concert tickets and airfare to any concert in the U.S. of a winner’s choosing, and a sweepstakes tie-in with Barq’s root beer infused the studio’s media budget with $1 million, and lasted five weeks. Paramount collaborated with DC Comics on four prequel comic books, also titled Cool World, and, in its most notable promotion for the film, devised a seventy-five-foot-high corrugated metal cutout of the cartoon version of Holli Would, to be placed atop the “D” on the famed Hollywood Sign in Los Angeles for one week, as noted in the 26 Jun 1992 LAT. The cutout was protested by residents of the Hollywood Hills neighborhood surrounding the sign, who feared it would attract visitors and cause traffic hazards on the windy, residential streets leading up to the sign. When the protestors failed to win a temporary restraining order against the cutout, they applied for a permanent injunction against its erection. On 6 Jul 1992, the day the Holli Would cutout was unveiled, an airplane flew a protest banner reading, “Paramount Not A Good Neighbor,” over the site, as noted in the 7 Jul 1992 LAT. Although the Hollywood Sign had been used for advertising before – once for a soft drink, another time to promote the launch of Twentieth Century Fox’s television network – “honorary mayor of Hollywood” Johnny Grant predicted the city would not allow the sign to be altered again. The Recreation and Parks Department allegedly denied Paramount’s initial request, before the studio made its case as a major employer of Los Angeles residents, and pledged $27,000 to the city, and an additional $27,000 to the Rebuild L.A. project.
       Critical reception was poor. The narrative was frequently criticized as nonsensical, and the 13 Jul 1992 HR review claimed the film was “not raunchy enough” to satisfy Bakshi fans, but too lurid for children. On a positive note, several reviewers praised the animation, and HR singled out Mark Isham’s score as a high point. The film opened 10 Jul 1992 on 1,448 screens, as stated in the 22 Jul 1992 HR. After a disappointing $5.5-million opening weekend, Paramount made the unorthodox decision to discontinue print advertising in all secondary markets, despite a 17 Jul 1992 expansion to 152 more screens. Although many exhibitors were surprised, Loews chairman A. Alan Friedberg was quoted as saying Paramount had made a wise business decision after the film’s negative reviews and bad word-of-mouth. A 1 Sep 1992 LAT article listed Cool World one of 1992’s “most notable flops,” with a cumulative domestic box-office gross, to date, of $14.1 million.
       According to a 29 Apr 1993 DV item, an ironworker fell while dismantling the controversial metal cutout of Holli Would atop the Hollywood Sign, suffering several broken ribs and two herniated discs, after scaffolding supporting the cutout collapsed. The worker sued Paramount Pictures for general and medical damages, but the outcome of the lawsuit could not be determined as of the writing of this Note.
       Stunt person Glenn Scott Wilder's name is misspelled "Glen Scott Wilder" in end credits.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 Jul 1992
p. 2, 7
Daily Variety
29 Apr 1993
---
Hollywood Drama-Logue
31 Jan 1991
---
Hollywood Drama-Logue
9--15 Jul 1992
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 1992
p. 4, 21, 27
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 1992
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jun 1992
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 1992
p. 5, 14
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jul 1992
p. 1, 17
Los Angeles Times
26 Jun 1992
Metro, p. 3
Los Angeles Times
6 Jul 1992
Calendar, p. 1
Los Angeles Times
7 Jul 1992
Metro, p. 3
Los Angeles Times
11 Jul 1992
p. 5
Los Angeles Times
1 Sep 1992
p. 1
New York Times
5 Jul 1992
Section A, p. 9
New York Times
11 Jul 1992
p. 12
Pulse!
Jul 1992
p. 92
Screen International
3 Nov 1990
---
Screen International
25 Jan 1991
---
Variety
6 May 1991
---
Variety
13 Jul 1992
p. 41
WSJ
26 Jun 1992
Section B, p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
A Frank Mancuso, Jr. Production
A Film by Ralph Bakshi
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
John A. Alonzo
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Remote cam op
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
Film loader
Film loader
Still photog
Spacecam op
Spacecam asst
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Cool World conceptual des
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Lead person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop des painter
Const coord
Const foreperson
Const accountant
Prop maker supv
Prop maker supv
Prop maker supv
Head paint foreperson
Paint supv
Paint supv
Set des
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Ms. Basinger's costumer
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus score by
Mus ed
Mus consultation by
Mus consultation by
Mus prod coord
Asst mus coord
Guest instrumentalist
Guest instrumentalist
Guest instrumentalist
Guest instrumentalist
Guest instrumentalist
Orch cond by
Orch mgr
Orch asst
Mus copyist
Mus remixed at
Mus rec and remixed by
Mus coord
Addl mus score by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom person
Cable person
Sd des
Sd des
Supv sd ed
ADR supv
Foley supv
ADR ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd asst
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Supv visual eff ed
Spec Eff, Anim
Mechanical spec eff supv
Key spec eff
Opticals by
Main title des by
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key make-up artist
Asst make-up artist
Asst make-up artist
Ms. Basinger's make-up artist
Ms. Basinger's body make-up
Key hairstylist
Ms. Basinger's hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Pilot
Pilot
Pilot
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Exec asst to Mr. Mancuso, Jr.
Asst to Mr. Bakshi
Asst to Ms. Williams
Casting asst
Unit pub
Prod auditor
Anim accountant
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Loc mgr
Extras coord
L.A.
Extras coord
Las Vegas
Transportation coord
Transportation coord
Caterer
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Greg Barnett
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Anim format photog
Anim supv
Char layout and des
Des, layout and anim
Des, layout and anim
Layout and anim
Layout and anim
Anim prod coord
Cool World background char
Cool World background char
Anim
Background artist
Background artist
Background artist
Background artist
Background coord
Anim cam coord
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim cam
Anim consultant
Asst anim coord
Asst anim coord
Asst anim coord
Overseas coord
Key clean up
Key clean up
Key clean up
Key clean up
Key clean up
Key clean up
Key clean up
Key clean up
Key clean up
Key clean up
Judith M. Niver
Key clean up
Key clean up
Sandra Ryan
Key clean up
Key clean up
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Ken McDonald
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Anim eff creative supv
Anim eff coord
Anim eff animator
Anim eff animator
Anim eff animator
Anim eff animator
Anim eff animator
Anim eff animator
Anim eff animator
Anim eff animator
Anim eff animator
Anim eff asst animator
Anim eff asst animator
Anim eff asst animator
Anim eff asst animator
Anim eff asst animator
Anim eff asst animator
Anim eff asst animator
Anim eff asst animator
Articulate mattes
Articulate mattes
Articulate mattes
Articulate mattes
Scene tracker
Ink & paint prod supv
Ink & paint asst coord
Key col modelist
Col models
Anim checking supv
Anim checking
Anim checking
Anim checking
Beverly Randall
Anim checking
Anim checking
Paint lab
Dupes
Janet M. Zoll
Xerox check supv
Karen N. China
Xerox check
Xerox check
Xerox check
Xerox check
Inking supv
Inking
Inking
Inking
Inking
Mark-up supv
Mark-up
Mark-up
Mark-up
Mark-up
Paint supv
Paint
Paint
Paint
Paint
Paint
Catherine Parotio
Paint
Paint
Paint
Paint check
Paint check
Paint check
Paint check
Paint check
Paint check
Sheryl Smith
Paint check
Paint check
Paint check
Repairs
Spec eff
Final check supv
CEL Service supv
CEL service
CEL service
CEL service
Ink & paint - Korea
Ink & paint - Korea
President
Pencil test
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Bob, Anim performance models
Mash, Anim performance models
Lonette, Anim performance models
Lonette, Anim performance models
Doc Whiskers, Anim performance models
Holli, Anim performance models
Nails, Anim performance models
Bash, Anim performance models
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Play With Me," written, performed and produced by Thompson Twins, Thompson Twins perform courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.; "My Ideal," by Leo Robin, Richard A. Whiting & Newell Chase; "Under," written, performed and produced by Brian Eno, Brian Eno performs courtesy of Opal Records; "N.W.O.," written and performed by Ministry, courtesy of Sire Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products; "Ah-Ah," by Richard M. Hall, performed and produced by Moby, Moby performs courtesy of Instinct Records; "The Devil Does Drugs," by Buzz McCoy & Groovie Mann, performed by My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult, courtesy of Wax Trax Records, Inc.; "The Witch," by Ian Astbury & Billy Duffy, performed by The Cult, produced by Rick Rubin, The Cult performs courtesy of Beggars Banquet/Sire Records; "Holli's Groove," by Buzz McCoy, performed by My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult, My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult performs courtesy of Interscope Records; "Sex On Wheelz," by Buzz McCoy & Groovie Mann, performed by My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult, courtesy of Interscope Records by arrangement with Wax Trax Records, Inc.; "Do That Thang," by Yuri Doktor, performed by Da Juice, produced by Da Juice & Rutger "Ruti" Kroese, additional production by Craig Kafton, courtesy of The RCA Records Label of BMG Music/Licensed through Boudisque Records; "Papua New Guinea," by Brian Dougans & Garry Cockbain, performed by The Future Sound of London, courtesy of Jumpin' & Pumpin' Records; "Next Is The E," by Richard M. Hall, performed and produced by Moby, Moby performs courtesy of Instinct Records; "Her Sassy Kiss," by Buzz McCoy, performed by My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult, My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult performs courtesy of Interscope Records; "Industry And Seduction," written, performed and produced by Tom Bailey, Tom Bailey performs courtesy of Warner Bros. Inc.; "Mindless," written, performed and produced by Mindless, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.; "Sedusa," by Buzz McCoy, performed by My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult, My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult performs courtesy of Interscope Records; "Let's Make Love," by Sammy Cahn & James Van Heusen, performed by Kim Basinger & Frank Sinatra, Jr.; 'Disappointed," by Johnny Marr, Bernard Sumner & Neil Tennant, performed by Electronic, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products; "Real Cool World," written and performed by David Bowie, produced by Nile Rodgers; "That Old Black Magic," by Harold Arlen & Johnny Mercer, performed by Frank Sinatra, Jr.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 July 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 Jul 1992; New York opening: week of 11 Jul 1992
Production Date:
15 Feb--19 Apr 1991
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Pictures Corporation
27 August 1992
PA582929
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Animation
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
101
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31111
SYNOPSIS

In 1945 Las Vegas, Nevada, World War II veteran Frank Harris returns home to his mother. He takes her for a ride on an Italian motorcycle he won in a poker game, and they are hit by a drunk driver. Frank’s mother is killed, while he is sucked through a portal into “Cool World,” a parallel universe populated by cartoons, known as “doodles.” There, Frank is greeted by a doodle named Doc Whiskers, who invented the “Spike of Power” that enabled Frank’s inter-world travel. Many years later, in 1992, comic book artist Jack Deebs is released from prison after serving time for killing a man he found in bed with his wife. Jack’s comic book series, Cool World, depicts the parallel universe that Frank Harris breached. Jack mistakenly believes he created the world himself, but the idea was planted in his head by buxom Cool World resident Holli Would. Holli dreams of living in the real world as a human being, or “noid,” and has built a shrine to Las Vegas in her home. She believes a legend that states “Vinnie Vegas” created the Spike of Power before crossing over to Las Vegas, where he now runs a casino. Frank Harris, who is now a Cool World police detective, insists that Vinnie Vegas is a myth, but Holli demands to know how Frank ended up in Cool World if inter-world travel is impossible. Since interspecies sex is rumored to transform doodles into noids, Holli pulls Jack Deebs into Cool World, but Frank Harris warns him that sex with Holli is strictly against the law. He then confiscates Jack’s fountain pen and empties the ...

More Less

In 1945 Las Vegas, Nevada, World War II veteran Frank Harris returns home to his mother. He takes her for a ride on an Italian motorcycle he won in a poker game, and they are hit by a drunk driver. Frank’s mother is killed, while he is sucked through a portal into “Cool World,” a parallel universe populated by cartoons, known as “doodles.” There, Frank is greeted by a doodle named Doc Whiskers, who invented the “Spike of Power” that enabled Frank’s inter-world travel. Many years later, in 1992, comic book artist Jack Deebs is released from prison after serving time for killing a man he found in bed with his wife. Jack’s comic book series, Cool World, depicts the parallel universe that Frank Harris breached. Jack mistakenly believes he created the world himself, but the idea was planted in his head by buxom Cool World resident Holli Would. Holli dreams of living in the real world as a human being, or “noid,” and has built a shrine to Las Vegas in her home. She believes a legend that states “Vinnie Vegas” created the Spike of Power before crossing over to Las Vegas, where he now runs a casino. Frank Harris, who is now a Cool World police detective, insists that Vinnie Vegas is a myth, but Holli demands to know how Frank ended up in Cool World if inter-world travel is impossible. Since interspecies sex is rumored to transform doodles into noids, Holli pulls Jack Deebs into Cool World, but Frank Harris warns him that sex with Holli is strictly against the law. He then confiscates Jack’s fountain pen and empties the ink from it, as the pen could do harm to a doodle. Frank returns home to his doodle girl friend, Lonette, with whom he maintains a sexless but loving relationship. Lonette fears that Frank will return to the real world to have sex, but he assures her that he would never leave. While Frank is with Lonette, Holli and Jack make love, and she is transformed into a noid. She steals Jack’s fountain pen, and goes to say a quick goodbye to her friends before crossing over. Frank’s police partner, a spider named Nails, finds the noid version of Holli on the street and tries to stop her. Holli points Frank’s empty fountain pen at Nails, and the doodle is sucked inside. On the run from Cool World police, she and Jack transport themselves to his home in Las Vegas. They go to a nightclub, where the overeager Holli flirts with other men and strips down to a skimpy dress. Jack tries to stop her from barging onto the stage, where she demands to sing “Let’s Make Love,” but he is thrown out of the club. On the sidewalk, Jack morphs into a doodle, then back into a noid. The same thing happens to Holli onstage. She runs outside in a panic, and Jack whisks her away. As they drive through town, morphing in and out of doodles, Holli explains the story of Vinnie Vegas, and tells Jack she must find the Spike of Power to be healed. She spots the spike in the sign for the Union Plaza Casino and demands to go there. Jack refuses to take her, so she pushes him out of his car and commandeers it. Back in Cool World, Frank informs Lonette that he must go after Holli. He shuts his eyes, recalls memories of his late mother, and falls into Jack’s home. Jack agrees to help Frank find Holli. On the way to the Union Plaza Casino, Frank explains that “Vinnie Vegas” is actually Doc Whiskers, who mapped out the tunnel between Cool World and the real world, and determined how easily one could destroy the balance of the inter-world matrix. Meanwhile, Holli encounters Doc Whiskers, still a doodle, who warns her not to tamper with his spike. She ignores him and breaks into the casino stairwell, hoping to get to the roof. When Frank and Jack arrive, Frank chases Holli to one of the top floors and follows her onto a balcony. Holli attempts to scale the building, but stops short, feigning a fear of heights. Frank reaches out to help her, but just as he takes her hand, she morphs into a doodle and pushes him. The fountain pen drops, too. On the sidewalk below, Jack wills himself to become a superhero doodle and goes after Holli on the roof. Holli removes the spike from the casino sign, releasing doodle demons that invade the city and turn humans into doodles. Jack recovers the spike and returns it to the sign, which restores order. Meanwhile, Nails emerges from the fountain pen Holli dropped. He finds Frank’s dead body and takes it back to Lonette, who is devastated until Nails tells her that Holli was a doodle when she killed Frank. Lonette rejoices, reminding Nails that a noid killed by a doodle is reincarnated into a doodle. Just then, Frank morphs into a doodle. He and Lonette retreat to her apartment to make love for the first time. Elsewhere, Jack, as the superhero doodle, and the disappointed Holli interact on the pages of a comic book.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Melvin and Howard

The following epilogue appears at the end of the film: “Howard Hughes died in April, 1976. The ‘Mormon Will’ was thrown out of Clark County Superior Court in June, ... >>

Why Be Good?

Referring to the film as That's a Bad Girl, the 20 Oct 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review announced that Colleen Moore would star and William A. ... >>

Back to the Future

       According to production notes from AMPAS library files, writer-director Robert Zemeckis and writer Bob Gale began work on the screenplay in fall 1980, aiming to tell a story ... >>

Daughters Courageous

Working titles for this film were American Family , A Family Affair , Family Affair , Fly Away Home and Family Reunion . ... >>

Double Indemnity

James M. Cain's novel Double Indemnity was serialized in Liberty magazine. Although Joseph Sistrom is listed as producer in various contemporary sources, the SAB at ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.