Final Analysis (1992)

R | 124 mins | Drama, Mystery | 7 February 1992

Director:

Phil Joanou

Writer:

Wesley Strick

Cinematographer:

Jordan Cronenweth

Editor:

Thom Noble

Production Designer:

Dean Tavoularis

Production Companies:

Warner Bros. Pictures , Roven-Cavallo Entertainment
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HISTORY

A 2 Dec 1989 Screen International item stated that Richard Gere, Ellen Barkin, and Melanie Griffith would star in Final Analysis for Witt/Thomas Productions and Warner Bros. Pictures. Filming was expected to begin in Apr 1990. Athough a 15 Feb 1990 DV item stated that producer Paul Junger Witt’s wife, screenwriter Susan Harris, would collaborate on the project, Harris was not mentioned in later production clippings in AMPAS library files, and receives no onscreen credit.
       Harold Becker was initially set to direct, but the 14 Jul 1990 Screen International reported that, although Warner Bros. gave him a green light to shoot in Sep 1990, Becker dropped out. At the time, Gere was still attached to star, but neither Barkin nor Griffith were mentioned, and neither remained with the project. The 17 Oct 1990 HR noted that, Joel Schumacher was considered to direct at one point, but John Boorman was ultimately chosen as Becker’s replacement, as announced in a 21 Aug 1990 DV “Just for Variety” brief. However, Boorman’s involvement was short-lived, as he and Gere disagreed over the script. Gere was said to prefer a version that director Phil Joanou had worked on in 1988, and rumors circulated that Joanou might replace for Boorman. The 1 Dec 1990 issue of Screen International confirmed that Joanou would direct, with principal photography expected to begin in Mar 1991. In a 10 Feb 1992 HR “Hollywood Report” column, Joanou stated that Warner Bros. had thrown out two years of rewrites and reverted to the 1988 draft of the screenplay he had worked on before leaving ... More Less

A 2 Dec 1989 Screen International item stated that Richard Gere, Ellen Barkin, and Melanie Griffith would star in Final Analysis for Witt/Thomas Productions and Warner Bros. Pictures. Filming was expected to begin in Apr 1990. Athough a 15 Feb 1990 DV item stated that producer Paul Junger Witt’s wife, screenwriter Susan Harris, would collaborate on the project, Harris was not mentioned in later production clippings in AMPAS library files, and receives no onscreen credit.
       Harold Becker was initially set to direct, but the 14 Jul 1990 Screen International reported that, although Warner Bros. gave him a green light to shoot in Sep 1990, Becker dropped out. At the time, Gere was still attached to star, but neither Barkin nor Griffith were mentioned, and neither remained with the project. The 17 Oct 1990 HR noted that, Joel Schumacher was considered to direct at one point, but John Boorman was ultimately chosen as Becker’s replacement, as announced in a 21 Aug 1990 DV “Just for Variety” brief. However, Boorman’s involvement was short-lived, as he and Gere disagreed over the script. Gere was said to prefer a version that director Phil Joanou had worked on in 1988, and rumors circulated that Joanou might replace for Boorman. The 1 Dec 1990 issue of Screen International confirmed that Joanou would direct, with principal photography expected to begin in Mar 1991. In a 10 Feb 1992 HR “Hollywood Report” column, Joanou stated that Warner Bros. had thrown out two years of rewrites and reverted to the 1988 draft of the screenplay he had worked on before leaving to direct State of Grace (1990, see entry).
       According to an interview with Joanou in the 7 Feb 1992 HR, the story originally took place in New York City, but a union strike prompted filmmakers to rewrite the setting. San Francisco, CA, was chosen because of its “character,” and a third-act set piece was changed to incorporate a car accident on the Golden Gate Bridge. When it proved too costly to shoot there, the bridge sequence was transposed to a lighthouse. Joanou mistakenly remembered seeing a lighthouse near the Golden Gate Bridge during a location scout, and sent a photographer to take pictures of it, only to learn no such lighthouse existed. Thus, exteriors of the Pigeon Point Lighthouse, fifty miles south of San Francisco, were filmed, and composited into wide shots by special visual effects company, Dream Quest Images.
       An item in the 29 Apr 1991 DV announced that Gere would co-star with Kim Basinger, Uma Thurman, and Eric Roberts. The 26 Apr 1991 Screen International also listed Thurman’s then husband, Gary Oldman, as a cast member, but Oldman does not appear in the final film.
       Although the 30 Apr 1991 HR production chart stated that principal photography began 23 Apr 1991, the 29 Apr 1991 DV claimed that filming commenced that day in San Francisco, where locations included stretches of cable car track on Hyde and Lombard streets; the San Francisco Courthouse; Presidio Yacht Club; Bix restaurant; the abandoned Presidio Hospital; and the Sir Francis Drake Hotel, where, according to production notes, a mezzanine foyer was converted into a tearoom. After four weeks, production moved to Los Angeles, CA. Sets built on soundstages at Warner Bros. Studios included lighthouse interiors, hospital rooms, offices, sidewalk cafes, and “Isaac Barr’s” home, complete with outdoor walkway and greenery, in the style of Frank Lloyd Wright. Los Angeles locations included the Rex Restaurant downtown; Royce Hall at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA); the defunct Lincoln Heights jailhouse; and the Park Plaza Hotel ballroom, which stood in for a courtroom. The top of Pigeon Point Lighthouse was recreated in Hangar 35 of Burbank Airport, where a thirty-eight-foot-tall replica, built from wood, steel, fiberglass, plastic, aluminum, and foam, took five weeks to construct.
       The film opened on 7 Feb 1992 to mixed reviews. Several critics noted the obvious influence of Alfred Hitchcock’s films, especially Vertigo (1958, see entry), but some described its similarities to Vertigo more favorably than others. The 1 Jun 1992 DV box-office chart cited a cumulative domestic gross of $24 million.
       Final Analysis marked the screenwriting debut of Wesley Strick, who previously worked as a rock journalist for Creem, Circus, and Rolling Stone magazines, as noted in the 8 Nov 2013 NYT.
       Chip Fowler was listed as production coordinator in the 30 Apr 1991 HR production chart, but is not credited in the final film.
More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Feb 1990.
---
Daily Variety
21 Aug 1990.
---
Daily Variety
29 Apr 1991.
---
Daily Variety
4 Feb 1992
p. 2, 11.
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Feb 1992
p. 9, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Feb 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 Feb 1992
p. 1.
New York Times
7 Feb 1992
p. 8.
New York Times
8 Nov 2013.
---
Screen International
2 Dec 1989.
---
Screen International
14 Jul 1990.
---
Screen International
1 Dec 1990.
---
Screen International
26 Apr 1991.
---
Variety
10 Feb 1992
p. 79.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Witt/Thomas Production
In association with Roven-Cavallo Entertainment
A Phil Joanou Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir (San Francisco)
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Video assist
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead person
Lead person (San Francisco)
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Cost supv
Costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Mr. Gere's ward by
MUSIC
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom person
Cable person
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
ADR ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Opticals
Title des
Process photog by
Spec visual eff by
Visual eff supv, Dream Quest Images
Visual eff prod, Dream Quest Images
Matte artist, Dream Quest Images
Matte photog, Dream Quest Images
Matte photog, Dream Quest Images
Plate photog supv, Dream Quest Images
Plate photog, Dream Quest Images
Pinblock cam op, Dream Quest Images
Visual eff ed, Dream Quest Images
Opt supv, Dream Quest Images
Opt line-up, Dream Quest Images
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
Ms. Basinger's hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Loc mgr (San Francisco)
Loc mgr (San Francisco)
Loc asst
Casting assoc
Casting assoc (San Francisco)
Asst prod secy
Asst prod secy (San Francisco)
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Roven
Asst to Mr. Witt
Asst to Mr. Joanou
Asst to Mr. Gere
Asst to Ms. Wilde
Staff asst
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Fitness trainer
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 February 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 7 February 1992
New York opening: week of 7 February 1992
Production Date:
began late April 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
14 May 1992
Copyright Number:
PA565592
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
124
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31600
SYNOPSIS

In San Francisco, California, psychiatrist Isaac Barr treats Diana Baylor, a young woman who describes her obsessive-compulsive habit of checking her oven multiple times before leaving the house. Diana suggests Isaac meet with her sister, Heather Evans, who knows things about their parents that might shed some light on Diana’s neuroses. Later, Isaac testifies in court on behalf of Pepe Carrero, a petty thief accused of murdering his stepfather. Isaac attests that Pepe was temporarily insane when he killed his stepfather, and offers to give him intensive psychotherapy, free of charge. Thanks to Isaac’s testimony, the jury finds Pepe not responsible for the crime. Isaac goes to a bar with his best friend, Mike O’Brien, the defense lawyer who represented Pepe. Mike taunts Isaac for working too hard, and encourages him to start dating again. Back at his office, Isaac is visited by the strikingly beautiful Heather Evans, the sister of his client, Diana Baylor. Heather tells him that Diana was raped by their father. In another therapy session, Diana talks about her latest obsessive-compulsive habit of checking a handgun that her sister gave her. Concerned, Isaac asks Diana to have Heather call him. When he and Heather meet, she denies giving Diana the gun. She also reveals that she is unhappily married to a Greek Orthodox gangster named Jimmy whom she is afraid to leave. Isaac confesses that he finds her irresistible, and the two make love. Before she returns home, Heather divulges that her and Diana’s mother left after their father raped Diana. Subsequently, their father died in a fire, which police suspected Diana might have started. Heather defended her sister, who has since blocked the ordeal ... +


In San Francisco, California, psychiatrist Isaac Barr treats Diana Baylor, a young woman who describes her obsessive-compulsive habit of checking her oven multiple times before leaving the house. Diana suggests Isaac meet with her sister, Heather Evans, who knows things about their parents that might shed some light on Diana’s neuroses. Later, Isaac testifies in court on behalf of Pepe Carrero, a petty thief accused of murdering his stepfather. Isaac attests that Pepe was temporarily insane when he killed his stepfather, and offers to give him intensive psychotherapy, free of charge. Thanks to Isaac’s testimony, the jury finds Pepe not responsible for the crime. Isaac goes to a bar with his best friend, Mike O’Brien, the defense lawyer who represented Pepe. Mike taunts Isaac for working too hard, and encourages him to start dating again. Back at his office, Isaac is visited by the strikingly beautiful Heather Evans, the sister of his client, Diana Baylor. Heather tells him that Diana was raped by their father. In another therapy session, Diana talks about her latest obsessive-compulsive habit of checking a handgun that her sister gave her. Concerned, Isaac asks Diana to have Heather call him. When he and Heather meet, she denies giving Diana the gun. She also reveals that she is unhappily married to a Greek Orthodox gangster named Jimmy whom she is afraid to leave. Isaac confesses that he finds her irresistible, and the two make love. Before she returns home, Heather divulges that her and Diana’s mother left after their father raped Diana. Subsequently, their father died in a fire, which police suspected Diana might have started. Heather defended her sister, who has since blocked the ordeal out of her memory. Later that night, when Heather arrives home, Jimmy instructs her to strip off her clothes and forces her to perform oral sex. In Diana’s next therapy session, she describes a recurring dream in which she arranges lilies, carnations, and violets in a vase. Determined to help Heather leave her husband, Isaac asks Mike to investigate Jimmy Evans’s illegal activities. Elsewhere, Heather goes to dinner with Jimmy. She takes a sip of wine, but he forbids her from drinking more, reminding her how easily she loses control. Heather defiantly gulps more wine until she starts to shake. She causes a scene in the restaurant and has to be ushered to the hospital. An emergency room doctor informs Jimmy that his wife suffers from “pathological intoxication,” a temporary state of insanity brought on by minor amounts of alcohol. When she recovers, Heather sneaks away with Isaac to an abandoned lighthouse near the Golden Gate Bridge. They climb the stairs to the balcony, but Heather is frightened when the railing comes loose. She hurries inside, dropping her purse. A metal dumbbell handle rolls out, and Isaac picks it up. Heather claims she keeps it on hand for protection. Later, Mike informs Isaac that Jimmy Evans is under federal investigation for money laundering, construction “bid rigging,” and pension fund scams. He warns Isaac to stay away from the gangster’s wife, but the infatuated Isaac follows her and Jimmy to a restaurant. Claiming she feels ill, Heather leaves the restaurant early, and gets a ride home from Isaac. Later that night, she drinks cough medicine, which brings on another episode of pathological intoxication. As Jimmy forces a kiss on her, she grabs one of his metal dumbbells and uses it to knock him in the head. Jimmy falls facedown into a filled bath. Isaac is called to the police station, where Heather is being held on suspicion of Jimmy’s murder. He hires Mike to represent her, and enlists the help of his colleague, Alan Lowenthal, an expert on pathological intoxication. Lowenthal testifies in court that several of his patients have done harm to themselves or others in the throes of pathological intoxication. Due to Alan’s testimony and the absence of a murder weapon, Heather is found not responsible for Jimmy’s murder, due to temporary insanity. However, she is sentenced to confinement at the Overland Psychiatric Hospital, where she will be released in four to six weeks, pending evaluation. Isaac serves as the head of psychiatry at Overland, and assures Heather she will be released as soon as possible. At a symposium, he hears another psychiatrist give a speech on one of Sigmund Freud’s patients, who dreamed about arranging flowers – specifically, lilies, carnations and violets. Isaac hastens to a library, finds the book in which Freud references the dream, and realizes that Diana fabricated stories in her therapy sessions. He returns to the courthouse to question Hector, a guard who mentioned that he recognized Heather from before her trial. Hector recalls that she used to frequent the courthouse as a spectator, whenever Isaac testified on behalf of the insane. Meanwhile, Mike discovers that Jimmy’s brother died just over a month ago, making Heather the beneficiary of Jimmy’s $4 million life insurance policy. Isaac goes to Overland Hospital to confront Heather, who admits to the ruse but threatens him not to cross her. She claims to have hidden the dumbbell she used to murder Jimmy, which is covered in Isaac’s fingerprints after he touched it at the lighthouse. Outside the hospital, police detective Huggins approaches Isaac, whom he suspects of murdering his lover’s husband in exchange for a cut of Jimmy’s life insurance policy. Isaac returns to the psychiatric hospital and tells Heather that he has reported her crime to two assistant district attorneys who want to interview her. She reminds him that double jeopardy prevents her from being tried twice, and agrees to the inquiry. During the evaluation, Isaac observes as Heather gives a false report of the crime, blaming Isaac for killing her husband. At Heather’s request, Diana joins her, but fails to bring the dumbbell, which Heather planned to hand over as evidence of Isaac’s guilt. Heather screams at her sister, and further loses her temper when she discovers the interrogators are hospital psychiatrists, not prosecutors as Isaac said. She is sedated and dragged away by orderlies. Sometime later, Isaac meets Diana, who has changed her hair to look like Heather’s. She assures him that she dropped the incriminating dumbbell into the bay, but Isaac does not trust her. He enlists Pepe Carrero to follow Diana when she visits her sister. Although Heather wants Diana to deliver the dumbbell to Detective Huggins, Diana is too nervous to go through with it. Heather coerces her to switch clothes in the bathroom, allowing Heather to escape the hospital as “Diana,” while Diana stays behind as an inmate. Pepe follows Heather, and tries to steal the dumbbell from her, but she retaliates by shooting him in the chest. She telephones Huggins and arranges to meet him at a marina. Isaac catches up to Pepe just as he is being taken away in an ambulance. Pepe directs him to the marina, where Isaac intervenes just as Heather passes off the dumbbell to Huggins. Isaac grabs the dumbbell, rendering his old fingerprints inadmissible. Heather takes the two hostages at gunpoint, and forces Huggins to drive away from the marina. A rainstorm hits, and he crashes into the ocean. Isaac escapes the sinking car and Heather follows him to the abandoned lighthouse, situated nearby. As she chases Isaac onto the balcony, he deduces that Heather was the one who was raped by her father, not Diana, and she must have started the fire that killed him. Heather admonishes him for trying to “shrink” her. A portion of the balcony breaks off, causing Isaac to fall. Just then, Huggins appears. Heather points her gun at him, but Isaac reaches up from the dangling balcony and pulls her over the edge. She falls to her death, and Isaac scrambles back inside. Diana is tried as Heather’s accomplice, but is found not guilty. Sometime later, posing as Heather, she seduces a wealthy man, and pretends to have a condition that forbids her from drinking. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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