The Last of the Mohicans (1992)

R | 112 mins | Adventure, Drama, Romance | 25 September 1992

Director:

Michael Mann

Producers:

Michael Mann, Hunt Lowry

Cinematographer:

Dante Spinotti

Production Designer:

Wolf Kroeger

Production Company:

Twentieth Century Fox
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HISTORY

A 15 Nov 1990 DV item reported that actor Daniel Day-Lewis had signed a two-picture deal with Twentieth Century Fox, and would appear in the studio’s upcoming productions, The Age of Innocence (1993, see entry), and The Last of the Mohicans, to be directed by Michael Mann. The screenplay, written by Mann and Christopher Crowe, drew from James Fennimore Cooper’s 1826 novel as well as a 1936 film adaptation written by Philip Dunne. The 10 Oct 1992 LAT noted the film’s deviations from Cooper’s novel, including the addition of a romance between “Hawkeye” and “Cora.” In the novel, Cora is a “mulatto” pursued by “Magua,” while, in the film, she is a British colonel’s daughter, and sister of “Alice Munro,” who falls in love with Hawkeye despite their class differences. Earlier versions of the story depicting Cora and Alice as white sisters included Maurice Tourneur’s film version, The Last of the Mohicans (1920, see entry), and the 1932 Mascot Pictures serial. University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) history professor Joyce Appleby pointed out the overall inaccuracy of the book’s conceit, as well as the 1992 film’s, that “Chingachgook” was the last of the Mohican Indians, noting that Mohican descendants were still alive in 1992.
       Although a 15 Feb 1991 Screen International item stated John Cusack had been cast as a British officer, Cusack did not appear in the final film.
       To prepare for the shoot, Daniel Day-Lewis and Michael Mann took part in weeks of wilderness training at the Special Operations Center in Alabama. There, Day-Lewis learned to use period weapons, start fires, and hunt and ... More Less

A 15 Nov 1990 DV item reported that actor Daniel Day-Lewis had signed a two-picture deal with Twentieth Century Fox, and would appear in the studio’s upcoming productions, The Age of Innocence (1993, see entry), and The Last of the Mohicans, to be directed by Michael Mann. The screenplay, written by Mann and Christopher Crowe, drew from James Fennimore Cooper’s 1826 novel as well as a 1936 film adaptation written by Philip Dunne. The 10 Oct 1992 LAT noted the film’s deviations from Cooper’s novel, including the addition of a romance between “Hawkeye” and “Cora.” In the novel, Cora is a “mulatto” pursued by “Magua,” while, in the film, she is a British colonel’s daughter, and sister of “Alice Munro,” who falls in love with Hawkeye despite their class differences. Earlier versions of the story depicting Cora and Alice as white sisters included Maurice Tourneur’s film version, The Last of the Mohicans (1920, see entry), and the 1932 Mascot Pictures serial. University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) history professor Joyce Appleby pointed out the overall inaccuracy of the book’s conceit, as well as the 1992 film’s, that “Chingachgook” was the last of the Mohican Indians, noting that Mohican descendants were still alive in 1992.
       Although a 15 Feb 1991 Screen International item stated John Cusack had been cast as a British officer, Cusack did not appear in the final film.
       To prepare for the shoot, Daniel Day-Lewis and Michael Mann took part in weeks of wilderness training at the Special Operations Center in Alabama. There, Day-Lewis learned to use period weapons, start fires, and hunt and skin game. Other actors went through additional training. Mann’s research materials, as noted in a 20 Sep 1992 LAT article, included rare “18th century saber-fighting manuals,” and the films Northwest Passage (1940, see entry) and Drums Along the Mohawk (1939, see entry).
       Principal photography began 17 Jun 1991, according to the 30 Jul 1991 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files state that the bulk of filming took place in old growth forests in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains. On a thirty-eight-acre tract of privately owned forest on Lake James, a replica of Fort William Henry was built in eleven weeks, according to a 30 Mar 1992 WSJ article, which also stated that timber used to build the fort came from local sources. When the structure was torn down, the area was re-seeded.
       Mann was said to be fanatical about details; however, some historical elements were impossible to recreate, including the dead languages of Wyandot, spoken by Huron Indians, and Mohican, as noted in the 25 Sep 1992 Vancouver Sun. In place of those languages, actors portraying Hurons spoke Mohawk, and actors portraying Mohicans spoke Munsee Deleware. Mann’s exhaustive approach caused tension with cast and crewmembers. According to a 21 May 1992 LAT article, several composers came on and off the project, one editor quit, and costume designer James Acheson walked off the set during production. After five weeks of shooting, director of photography Doug Milsome was fired, and replaced by Dante Spinotti. Mann was unapologetic about personnel changes, and was quoted in the 20 Sep 1992 LAT as saying, “If someone wants a country-club shoot, they’re in the wrong movie...Because I reserve the right to involve myself in every department, I need self-confident people with strong egos around me.” Mann also sought sole writing credit in a Writers Guild of America (WGA) arbitration, but lost.
       Despite the film’s reported $35 million budget, producers claimed it was made independently as part of a “negative pickup deal” with Twentieth Century Fox, and therefore qualified for a lower budget, non-union movie crew. Numerous unions planned to picket, as noted in the 10 Jun 1991 Var, and only a week after filming had begun, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (I.A.T.S.E.) organized the crew, who were henceforth paid union rates, as stated in the 21 May 1992 LAT.
       The largely outdoor shoot called for a rain insurance policy, according to a 2 Nov 1992 People item. Meteorologist Odell S. Sluder was hired to measure rainfall on set; any day in which “more than one tenth of an inch of precipitation” fell per hour for more than four hours would be considered a loss. Based on Sluder’s readings, Fox collected losses on four rain days, although the 20 Sep 1992 LAT reported rainfall on forty days of the seventy-three-day shoot. The budget reportedly grew to $40 million during production, and a 25 Sep 1992 WSJ article cited “bad weather and labor problems” as the primary causes.
       The Last of the Mohicans marked Native American activist Russell Means’s feature film acting debut. An Oglala Lakota Indian who co-founded the American Indian Movement and founded the American Indian Anti-Defamation Council, Means was reportedly upset by “institutionalized racism” he encountered during filming and demanded that crewmembers distinguish between the French-allied Indian extras and English-allied Indian extras when calling them to set. Means also helped 175 Native American extras lobby for better pay and improved lodging conditions, which led to Native American extras being paid more than their white counterparts. Means also insisted that his breechcloth be larger than the extras’ breechcloths, which exposed more of their buttocks. Unsuccessfully, Means tried to have a scene removed that he considered stereotypical, in which Magua presents Cora to the Huron elder as if she is “the white princess… brought back to the bloodthirsty Indian villagers.”
       A 26 Sep 1991 DV article announced distribution rights to foreign territories outside the U. S. and Canada were sold for $17 million to Morgan Creek International (MCI), in a deal that marked MCI’s “first acquisition of a third-party film.” Morgan Creek was also set to release the soundtrack by Trevor Jones and Randy Edelman, according to an 18 Sep 1992 HR brief.
       The initial release date of 3 Jul 1992 was moved to 25 Sep 1992 due to an overcrowded summer marketplace, as noted in a 4 Sep 1992 HR item. An opening-weekend platform release in ten cities was set to precede a 2 Oct 1992 nationwide release on 1,000 screens. Despite the delayed release, the original 26 Aug 1992 French release date remained unchanged. Therefore, according to a 23 Aug 1992 LAT article, the film was first released in France.
       Opening weekend domestic box-office grosses were cited as $10.98 million in the 15 Oct 1992 HR. In the second week of release, the film took in approximately $10 million more, and was particularly well-received in small towns and middle America, according to the 6 Oct 1992 LAT. The cumulative box-office gross was listed as $75.5 million in a 17-23 Sep 2001 Var article, which described The Last of the Mohicans as Michael Mann’s “commercial high” as a director.
       Critical reception was generally positive. The film won an Academy Award for Best Sound, and two British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Awards for Best Cinematography and Make-Up. It was also nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score – Motion Picture, and won the Film Information Council’s first-ever monthly FIC Excellence in Film Marketing Award, according to a 23 Nov 1992 Var brief.
       End credits include the following statements: “The producers wish to thank: Chief Leon Shenandoah and The Confederacy of the Six Nations; U. S. Forest Service; Ted Brasser, Prof. Frederick Cassidy, John O’Meara; Heye Museum; Smithsonian Institution; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Adidas; Adventure Wilderness Programs, Inc.”; “And special thanks to the American Indian Movement for the appearance of Dennis J. Banks in his role as 'Ongewasgone'"; “Animal action supervised by The Greeville Humane Society”; “Filmed on location in North Carolina; Locations provided by: The Biltmore Company; Chimney Rock Park, North Carolina; Crescent Resources, Inc.; Department of the Interior and The National Park Service; Duke Power Company; The Manor – Asheville, North Carolina.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Nov 1990.
---
Daily Variety
26 Sep 1991
p. 1, 14.
Daily Variety
27 Aug 1992
p. 2, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Sep 1992
p. 3, 37.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Sep 1992
p. 5, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Feb 1992
Calendar, p. 23.
Los Angeles Times
21 May 1992
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
23 Aug 1992
Calendar, p. 26.
Los Angeles Times
20 Sep 1992
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
25 Sep 1992
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
6 Oct 1992
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
9 Oct 1992
p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
10 Oct 1992
p. 1.
New York Times
25 Sep 1992
p. 3.
People
2 Nov 1992.
---
Screen International
15 Feb 1991.
---
The Vancouver Sun
25 Sep 1992
Section C, p. 9.
Variety
10 Jun 1991.
---
Variety
31 Aug 1992
p. 60.
Variety
23 Nov 1992.
---
Variety
17-23 Sep 2001
p. 3.
WSJ
25 Sep 1992
Section B, p. 1.
WSJ
30 Mar 1993
Section A, p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Twentieth Century Fox Presents
A Film by Michael Mann
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
Prod mgr, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Prod
Supv prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Addl asst cam
Addl asst cam
Addl asst cam
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Cam intern
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Best boy elec
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Lamp op
Video assist
Still photog
Grip labor
Grip labor
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Visual consultant
Visual consultant
Art dir
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Lamp op
Storyboards
Storyboards
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Addl ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Post prod supv
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Asst set dec
Lead person
On set dresser
Set dressing foreman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Const coord
Const adv
Const foreman
Prop master
Prop master
Prop asst
Prop asst
Prop asst
Prop asst
Armourer
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greensman
Greens labor
Stand-by painter
Trade guns and leather work
Prop labor
Prop labor
Fort William Henry built by
Fort William Henry built by, Pryority Group, Ltd.
Const coord
Spec weapons
Spec weapons
Spec weapons
Spec weapons
"Killdeer" gun made by
Addl guns by
Custom knives by
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Set costumer
Set costumer
Cost maker
Cost maker
Cost dept supv
Military cost adv
Military ward, Sentry Post
Des asst
Cutter/Fitter
Ward asst
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus supv
Mus consultant
Mus consultant
Mus consultant
Mus cond by
Mus cond by
Scoring mixer
Scoring mixer
Scoring mixer
Scoring mixer
Scoring mixer
Orch
Asst orch
Synclavier consultant
Mus contractor
Mus preparation
Addl mus by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Boom op
Cable person
Sd des and supv
Sd eff supv
ADR supv
Digital dialog ed
Digital dialog ed
Digital dialog ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Addl audio
Addl audio
Addl audio
Foley by
Foley by
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Foley rec
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Spec eff admin
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff coord, 2d unit
Main title des by
Titles and opticals by
Spec opt eff by
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairdresser/Wigmaker
Hairdresser/Wigmaker
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
Background hair stylist
Wig dresser
Wig dresser
Wig dresser
Wig dresser
Addl makeup
Addl makeup
Addl makeup
Addl makeup
Addl makeup
Hair asst
Hair asst
Hair asst
Hair asst
Hair asst
Hair asst
Hair asst
Hair asst
Hair asst
Hair asst
Prosthetic makeup artist
Prosthetic makeup artist
Prosthetic makeup artist
Prosthetic makeup artist
Prosthetic makeup artist
Prosthetic makeup artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
Tattoo artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Loc mgr (N. C.)
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
2d asst prod accountant
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Accounting asst
Post prod accountant
Casting - London
Extras & London casting
Casting asst (N. Y.)
Casting asst (N. Y.)
Casting asst (N. Y.)
Casting asst
Casting asst
Casting asst
Casting asst
Casting asst
Casting asst
Casting secy
Key set prod asst
Military tech adv
Tech adv and trainer
Reenactor coord
Native American coord
Hawkeye physical trainer
Dialect coach
Dialect coach
Acting coach
18th century frontier consultant
18th century military consultant
Deleware language instructor
Deleware language instructor
Unit pub
Prod coord
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Mann (L. A.)
Asst to Mr. Mann (L. A.)
Asst to Mr. Mann (N. C.)
Asst to Mr. Mann (N. C.)
Researcher
Asst to Mr. Lowry
Prod assoc
Loc intern
Loc intern
Mountaineer
Engineering/Loc consultant
Medical coord
Asst first aid
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (N. C.)
Prod asst (L. A.)
Prod asst (L. A.)
Prod asst (L. A.)
Prod asst (L. A.)
Prod asst (L. A.)
Prod asst (L. A.)
Security chief
Camp Mohican coord
Wrangler
Meteorologist
Wagon master
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Dispatch coord
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Pub consultant
Prod catering
Prod catering, Gala Catering
Transportation coord, 2d unit
Prod coord, 2d unit
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based upon the novel The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper (Philadelphia, 1826), and the 1936 screenplay by Philip Dunne, adaptation by John L. Balderston and Paul Perez and Daniel Moore.
SONGS
"I Will Find You," written and produced by Ciaran Brennan, performed by Clannad, courtesy of Atlantic Records
"The Gael," written by Dougie MacLean, arranged and adapted by Trevor Jones
"The House In Rose Valley," written and performed by Phil Cunningham, courtesy of GreenLinnet Records, Inc.
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 September 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 September 1992
Production Date:
began 17 June 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
23 September 1992
Copyright Number:
PA582583
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
112
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31878
SYNOPSIS

In 1757, England and France are at war over possession of the American colonies. In the New York colony, poor British settlers peacefully co-exist with local Native Americans. Nathaniel “Hawkeye” Poe, who was orphaned as a baby and raised as the “white son” of a Mohican Indian, spends his days hunting and trapping with his adoptive father, Chingachgook, and Uncas, Chingachgook’s biological son. British officers enlist the settlers in a colonial militia to fight against the French. Hawkeye refuses to take part, but his friend, Jack Winthrop, meets with British General Webb to negotiate terms of service. Winthrop and other settlers will fight, but if their homes come under attack, they must be free to return and defend them. Webb agrees, and orders Major Duncan Heyward to lead a regiment to Fort William Henry, where they will report to Colonel Munro. Maj. Heyward goes to Albany to collect Munro’s daughters, Cora and Alice. Heyward hopes to marry Cora, but she is not in love with him. He begs her to reconsider, based on their friendship and families’ approval, and she agrees to think about it. Cora and Alice ride with Heyward and his regiment to Fort William Henry. They are escorted by a Huron Indian named Magua, who has secretly arranged an ambush. A Huron war party attacks them in a forest. Magua turns on the British troops, and, in the fray, aims his gun at Cora. Hawkeye, Chingachgook, and Uncas, who have been hunting nearby, intervene and save Heyward, Cora, and Alice. Magua escapes. Hawkeye reluctantly agrees to accompany the survivors to Fort William Henry. On the way, the settlers find the home of their friend John Cameron ... +


In 1757, England and France are at war over possession of the American colonies. In the New York colony, poor British settlers peacefully co-exist with local Native Americans. Nathaniel “Hawkeye” Poe, who was orphaned as a baby and raised as the “white son” of a Mohican Indian, spends his days hunting and trapping with his adoptive father, Chingachgook, and Uncas, Chingachgook’s biological son. British officers enlist the settlers in a colonial militia to fight against the French. Hawkeye refuses to take part, but his friend, Jack Winthrop, meets with British General Webb to negotiate terms of service. Winthrop and other settlers will fight, but if their homes come under attack, they must be free to return and defend them. Webb agrees, and orders Major Duncan Heyward to lead a regiment to Fort William Henry, where they will report to Colonel Munro. Maj. Heyward goes to Albany to collect Munro’s daughters, Cora and Alice. Heyward hopes to marry Cora, but she is not in love with him. He begs her to reconsider, based on their friendship and families’ approval, and she agrees to think about it. Cora and Alice ride with Heyward and his regiment to Fort William Henry. They are escorted by a Huron Indian named Magua, who has secretly arranged an ambush. A Huron war party attacks them in a forest. Magua turns on the British troops, and, in the fray, aims his gun at Cora. Hawkeye, Chingachgook, and Uncas, who have been hunting nearby, intervene and save Heyward, Cora, and Alice. Magua escapes. Hawkeye reluctantly agrees to accompany the survivors to Fort William Henry. On the way, the settlers find the home of their friend John Cameron burned to the ground, and determine that Ottawa Indians, allied with the French, are responsible. Cora reprimands Hawkeye for leaving his friends’ bodies on the ground. That night, she finds him standing watch at their campsite and asks why he didn’t give his friends Christian burials. He explains that if they had buried the Camerons, they would have endangered everyone by leaving proof they had been there. He reveals that he was orphaned as a boy and raised by Chingachgook, who sent him to a colonial school so he would learn English as well as Mohican. He charms her with a Native American tale about the origin of the stars, and Cora remarks that she finds frontier life deeply stirring. The next night, they find Fort William Henry under siege. Colonel Munro says he sent a letter, via Magua, warning Webb’s regiments to stay away, but Heyward informs him that Magua betrayed them. Hawkeye warns that war parties are attacking settlers’ homes, and suggests colonial militiamen be sent to protect their families. Munro disagrees, and says anyone caught leaving will be hanged for sedition. Hawkeye finds Jack Winthrop and warns him about the attacks. Winthrop and his friends arrange to flee that night. Hawkeye suggests a route, but will not go with them. Having noticed Hawkeye’s interest in Cora, Winthrop teases his friend, and Hawkeye admits to staying behind for the girl. Meanwhile, Magua reports to French General Montcalm that he was successful in stopping Heyward’s regiment, but was unable to kill Colonel Munro’s daughters. At Fort William Henry, Hawkeye pulls Cora aside and kisses her. Later, he is taken prisoner for helping his friends in the colonial militia desert. Cora begs her father to release Hawkeye, but Munro insists he will be tried and hanged the next day. However, the fort falls to the French that night. General Montcalm offers Munro a surrender deal: the British troops will not be taken prisoner, but sent back to England, and colonial settlers will be allowed to return home. Munro accepts the deal on behalf of himself and General Webb, who is at Fort Edward, twelve miles away. The British troops are escorted to Fort Edward. However, Montcalm, who does not believe General Webb will agree to the surrender terms, arranges with Magua to conduct an ambush before they arrive. Magua, who has a vendetta against Munro for destroying his village and his marriage, is determined to kill the British general and his daughters. Soon, Magua and his war party attack. Magua murders Munro and removes the colonel’s heart. With the help of Hawkeye, Chingachgook, and Uncas, Heyward, Cora, and Alice escape in canoes. They paddle downriver until they reach a waterfall too big to traverse. They take cover in a cave, where Hawkeye explains to Cora that he must flee before Magua gets there. He promises to rescue her once she is taken captive, and instructs her to submit. As expected, Magua and his war party soon arrive, taking Cora, Alice, and Heyward prisoner. The next day, Magua delivers them to a Huron elder named Sachem, and suggests they sell Heyward to the French army. Hawkeye appears, unarmed, and asks Sachem to set Cora and Alice free. According to Hawkeye, Magua betrayed the French, but Magua argues that he only made the French fear the Huron, which will lead to better trading terms. Sachem accuses Magua of adopting the Frenchmen’s greed, and claims that his heart is twisted. He orders Magua to take Alice as a wife, so his heart can be healed. He frees Heyward, and orders Cora to be burned at the stake to pay for Magua’s dead children. Hawkeye and Maj. Heyward both beg to be killed in Cora’s place. Heyward negotiates with Sachem in French, and Sachem agrees to sacrifice him instead. Cora is released to Hawkeye. They retreat to the woods, where Hawkeye takes aim at Heyward as he is burned, and shoots him to relieve his misery. Hawkeye, Chingachgook, and Uncas track Magua and his men as they trek along a mountainside with Alice. Uncas catches up with them and attacks Magua, but Magua slits his throat and throws him over a cliff. Horrified by Magua’s brutality, Alice jumps to her death. Chingachgook avenges the death of his son by killing Magua. He and Hawkeye perform a Mohican funeral rite for Uncas, and Chingachgook refers to himself as the “last of the Mohicans.” He warns Hawkeye that white men are taking over the frontier, and frontier men like Hawkeye will become extinct, like the Mohicans. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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