Full page view
HISTORY

End credits include the following statements: “The producers gratefully acknowledge the following for their assistance and cooperation: Texas Film Commission, Office of Governor Ann W. Richards; Irving Texas Film Commission; Amarillo Film Office; The Citizens of Plainview, Groom, Amarillo and Dallas, Texas, special thanks to Muff London of Plainview City Hall; Texas Department of Public Safety; Texas Department of Transportation; Rehabilitation Institute of Methodist Hospital, Lubbock”; “Filmed partially at the studios at Las Colinas, Irving, Texas"; "‘All My Children’ provided courtesy of American Broadcasting Companies, Inc; Location equipment by Cinerep International, Inc.; Remote crane provided by Technocrane Ltd.; Digital recording using the Yamaha [ill.] 2D-Bit Digital Multitrack Recorder.; Microphones provided by Audio Technica"; and, "A special thanks to Charles Suppon and Peter Allen."
       After an “exhaustive search,” Paramount Pictures announced that Leap of Faith would be its Christmas 1992 release, as reported in the 13 Apr 1992 Var. Although The Firm and Indecent Proposal (1993, see entries) were also considered, the studio determined that neither could be finished in time. Michael Keaton was named as a contender for the lead role of “Jonas Nightingale,” but Steve Martin was ultimately cast. Filmmakers had roughly six months to complete the project, with three months of pre-production preceding the shoot. Director Richard Pearce stated in the 17-23 Dec 1992 Drama-Logue that the rushed schedule required seven-day work weeks.
       Producer Daniel Melnick was brought in to oversee the production, but left the film over money differences with Paramount, as noted in 23 Jun 1992 DV and 29 Jun 1992 Var items. Melnick reportedly requested a $750,000 fee “against ... More Less

End credits include the following statements: “The producers gratefully acknowledge the following for their assistance and cooperation: Texas Film Commission, Office of Governor Ann W. Richards; Irving Texas Film Commission; Amarillo Film Office; The Citizens of Plainview, Groom, Amarillo and Dallas, Texas, special thanks to Muff London of Plainview City Hall; Texas Department of Public Safety; Texas Department of Transportation; Rehabilitation Institute of Methodist Hospital, Lubbock”; “Filmed partially at the studios at Las Colinas, Irving, Texas"; "‘All My Children’ provided courtesy of American Broadcasting Companies, Inc; Location equipment by Cinerep International, Inc.; Remote crane provided by Technocrane Ltd.; Digital recording using the Yamaha [ill.] 2D-Bit Digital Multitrack Recorder.; Microphones provided by Audio Technica"; and, "A special thanks to Charles Suppon and Peter Allen."
       After an “exhaustive search,” Paramount Pictures announced that Leap of Faith would be its Christmas 1992 release, as reported in the 13 Apr 1992 Var. Although The Firm and Indecent Proposal (1993, see entries) were also considered, the studio determined that neither could be finished in time. Michael Keaton was named as a contender for the lead role of “Jonas Nightingale,” but Steve Martin was ultimately cast. Filmmakers had roughly six months to complete the project, with three months of pre-production preceding the shoot. Director Richard Pearce stated in the 17-23 Dec 1992 Drama-Logue that the rushed schedule required seven-day work weeks.
       Producer Daniel Melnick was brought in to oversee the production, but left the film over money differences with Paramount, as noted in 23 Jun 1992 DV and 29 Jun 1992 Var items. Melnick reportedly requested a $750,000 fee “against 5% of the first dollar gross,” and Paramount refused. He then asked for $500,000 and a $250,000 donation to the Sundance Institute and Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). The studio rejected his proposal again, citing its policy against making charitable contributions on behalf of individuals. In turn, Melnick requested the $250,000, promising to make the donation himself, but Paramount agreed only to a flat fee of $500,000. Melnick became frustrated with the back-and-forth and offered to work for “no negotiated fee,” suggesting that Paramount decide his compensation on a “fair play” basis. Around the start of principal photography, Paramount replaced Melnick with David Picker. Steve Martin was quoted in the 29 Jun 1992 Var as saying it was a shame Melnick left the project, as his contributions had been “fundamental.”
       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that writer Janus Cercone first came up with the idea for the screenplay, initially titled Sympathy for the Devil, after dreaming the entire story, “including act breaks and character descriptions.” To help the narrative relate to a mass audience, psychologist Michael Bleger was paid $150,000 to analyze the script, as noted in a 29 Jun 1992 People brief. A Var item of the same date cited the budget as $33 million, while the 10 Jan 1993 LAT later reported the film cost only $20 million. Steve Martin was slated to earn $6 million, while his co-star, Debra Winger, was paid $2 million. In preparation for their roles, the actors joined director Richard Pearce at a Midwestern preachers’ convention shortly before filming began.
       Principal photography started on 21 Jun 1992, as noted in several contemporary sources including a 4 Aug 1992 HR production chart, and ended 1 Sep 1992, as stated in a DV brief published the following day. Parts of Texas stood in for drought-ridden Kansas, as Kansas had just received record annual rainfall and was deemed too lush by location scouts. With its picturesque business district, Plainview, TX, was chosen as the principal location for fictional “Rustwater.” To create the illusion of rampant dust storms, wind machines were set up, foliage was hidden, and cars were coated with dust. Other TX locations included Amarillo; the town of Claude, where Paramount’s Hud (1963, see entry) was filmed; the towns of Happy and Tulia; and the small town of Groom, where the revival tent was erected. Built over the course of three months by Mike Sandone Productions in Dallas, the 13,000-square-foot tent could hold as many as 1,000 background actors, and, according to production notes, a real-life evangelist was so impressed with the structure, he offered to buy it. For the traffic jam sequence, a section of old Route 66 was shut down, and interiors were filmed at Las Colinas Studios near Dallas. A total of nearly 10,000 background actors were employed during the sixty-day shoot.
       According to a 17 Dec 1992 Long Beach Press-Telegram item, Richard Pearce responded to rumors that Debra Winger caused tension on the set by stating that she simply demanded “everybody have the highest standards, like she does.” In a 26 Dec 1992 LAT article, members of the “Angels of Mercy” gospel choir depicted in the film commented about the on-set tensions, saying that some Paramount executives were moved to tears on the last day of filming and thanked the gospel singers, saying their music was the only reason they stayed on the project. The choir included Edwin Hawkins, whose “Oh Happy Day” was a top five “pop-gospel cross-over” hit in 1969; Albertina Walker of the Caravans, known as “the queen of gospel”; veteran Delores Hall, and upcoming star Ricky Dillard. Albertina Walker told LAT that the choir often continued to sing after Pearce yelled “cut,” because “the Spirit came to them.” Instead of acting, Walker claimed the Angels of Mercy “were really having a service.”
       Paramount chairman Brandon Tartikoff resigned a month before the film opened, according to an 8 Nov 1992 LAT article, inciting rumors that Leap of Faith had something to do with his departure. Tartikoff was blamed for Paramount’s insufficient Christmas line-up, which would normally have entailed two films instead of one. In response to the rumors, Steve Martin defended Leap of Faith, which was in the final editing stages, saying he was “ecstatic” with it and denying that Tartikoff’s exit had anything to do with the film. Finishing touches were completed 4 Dec 1992, two weeks before the 18 Dec 1992 theatrical release, as noted in the 17 Dec 1992 Long Beach Press-Telegram.
       Reviews were mixed. The 10 Jan 1993 LAT named Leap of Faith one of the Christmas season’s “big disappointments,” along with Toys and Hoffa (1992, see entries), and predicted a final box-office gross of less than $20 million. Some speculated the opening date should have been pushed to Jan or Feb 1993, when the film would not be in direct competition with Forever Young or The Bodyguard (1992, see entries). However, LAT suggested the subject matter might have played the biggest role in its failure, quoting a marketing source who said, “The middle part of the country will not go to a movie that mocks God and religion, and people on the coasts don’t want to see something cynical that suddenly turns sentimental.”
       A musical based on Leap of Faith spent ten years in development, as stated in a 26 Sep 2010 LAT article. Taylor Hackford was originally set to direct, as announced in an 11 Apr 2006 DV item, and the show was expected to debut in the 2007-2008 season. The score was written by Alan Menken, with lyrics by Glenn Slater, and book by Janus Cercone, who, along with her husband, producer Michael Manheim, “courted” Alan Menken to write the music for four years before he agreed to the project. According to a 6 Oct 2010 New York Post item, prior to the musical’s 3 Oct 2010 opening at Los Angeles, CA’s Ahmanson Theatre, director Taylor Hackford was replaced by choreographer Rob Ashford, and Brooke Shields was brought in to replace Sutton Foster as Jonas Nightingale’s love interest, “Marva McGowan.” The $12 million production received mixed reviews but went on to Broadway, where it debuted 26 Apr 2012 at the St. James Theatre, and played for less than a month before closing on 13 May 2012. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Jun 1992
p. 31.
Daily Variety
2 Sep 1992.
---
Daily Variety
15 Dec 1992.
---
Daily Variety
11 Apr 2006
p. 1, 12.
Drama-Logue
17-23 Dec 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Aug 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1992
p. 10, 20.
Long Beach Press-Telegram
30 Aug 1992.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
17 Dec 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Nov 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Dec 1992
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
26 Dec 1992
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jan 1993
Calendar, p. 22.
Los Angeles Times
26 Sep 2010.
---
New York Post
6 Oct 2010
p. 44.
New York Times
18 Dec 1992
p. 14.
People
29 Jun 1992.
---
Variety
13 Apr 1992.
---
Variety
29 Jun 1992.
---
Variety
21 Dec 1992
p. 61.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures presents
A Michael Manheim David V. Picker Production
A Richard Pearce Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
Dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst photog
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
2d asst photog
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst
Technocrane op
Technocrane op
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
1st company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
Theatrical lighting for revival seq des by
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Video displays by
Supervising video eng
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadperson
Set dresser buyer
Dresser
Prop master
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Prop person
Const coord
Const foreperson
Const foreperson
Paint foreperson
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Mr. Martin's costumer
MUSIC
Mus score comp and cond by
Mus supv
Prod mus supv
Supervising mus ed
Supervising mus ed
Prod mus mixer
Remote must rec
Remote mus playback op
Asst to George Duke
Orchestrations by
Orchestrations by
Mus preparation
Orch contractor
Mus scoring mixer
Mus score recorded at
Gospel songs and choir produced by
Choirmaster
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supervising sd ed
Supervising sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Supervising ADR ed
ADR ed
Supervising foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Opticals
Title des
DANCE
Choreog
Irish step dance instructor
MAKEUP
Key makeup
Mr. Martin's makeup
Makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Mr. Martin's hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Loc casting by
Scr supv
Dial coach
Asst pub
Asst to Mr. Pearce
Asst to Mr. Manheim
Asst to Mr. Singleton
Asst to Mr. Picker
Asst to Mr. Martin
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod auditor
Asst prod accountant
Casting assoc
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Prod office coord
Prod office coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod assoc
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Voice casting
Cons and frauds consultant
Medical consultant
Prod stage coord
Tent const by
Animal handler
Butterfly handler
Butterfly handler
First aid
First aid
First aid
Agronomist
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt (Dallas)
Catering provided by
Craft service
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Sit Down You’re Rockin’ The Boat,” by Frank Loesser, performed and produced by Don Henley, Don Henley performs courtesy of Geffen Records
“Paradise By The Dashboard Light,” by Jim Steinman, performed by Meat Loaf, produced by Todd Runderen, Courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“Change In My Life,” by Billy Straus, arranged by Sean Altman and Billy Straus, performed by The Angels of Mercy
+
SONGS
“Sit Down You’re Rockin’ The Boat,” by Frank Loesser, performed and produced by Don Henley, Don Henley performs courtesy of Geffen Records
“Paradise By The Dashboard Light,” by Jim Steinman, performed by Meat Loaf, produced by Todd Runderen, Courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“Change In My Life,” by Billy Straus, arranged by Sean Altman and Billy Straus, performed by The Angels of Mercy
“What It Takes,” written and performed by Brendan Croker, produced by Barry Beckett, courtesy of Silvertone Records
“Ready For A Miracle,” by Art Reynolds and Bunny Hill performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“Blessed Assurance,” by Fanny J. Crosby and Mrs. Joseph F. Knapp, arranged by Edwin Hawkins, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“Lord Will Make A Way (Somehow),” by Thomas A. Dorsey, arranged by Edwin Hawkins, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“God Said He Would See You Through,” by Rev. Milton R. Biggham, arranged by Edwin Hawkins, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
"My Faith Looks Up To Thee," by Ray Palmer and Lowell Masow, arranged by Edwin Hammins, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
"God Will Take Care Of You," by Edwin Hawkins, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“It's A Highway To Heaven,” by Mary Gardner and Thomas A. Dorsey, arranged by Edwin Hawkins, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“Stones Throw From Hurtin'," by Elton John and Taupin performed by Wynonna, produced by Tony Brown and Brian Tankersley, Wynonna performs courtesy of Curb/MCA Records
“No Future In The Past,” by Carl Jackson and Vince Gill, produced by Tony Brown, courtesy of MCA Records
“Jesus On The Mainline,” arranged by Edwin Hawkins and George Duke, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“Pass Me Not,” by Fanny J. Crosby and W. H. Doane, arranged and performed by Lyle Lovett and George Duke, produced by George Duke and Lyle Lovett, Lyle Lovett performs courtesy of Curb/MCA Records, George Duke performs courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc
“Bringing In The Sheaves,” by Knowles Shaw and George A. Minor, arranged by Edwin Hawkins, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“Psalm 27,” arranged by Walter Whitman, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“Yakety Yak,” by Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller
“Amazing Grace,” by John Newton, arranged by Edwin Hawkins, performed by The Angels of Mercy, produced by George Duke
“Ready For A Miracle,” by Art Reynolds and Bunny Hill, performed by Patti LaBelle, featured vocalist Edwin Hawkins, produced by George Duke
"Organ Interludes," by Jerry Peters.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Sympathy for the Devil
Release Date:
18 December 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 18 December 1992
Production Date:
21 June--1 September 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
19 January 1993
Copyright Number:
PA606462
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
107
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Miracles and Wonders, a traveling religious outfit led by crooked evangelist Jonas Nightingale, caravans to its next stop in Topeka, Kansas. When a policeman pulls over Hoover, one of the bus drivers, for an outstanding drunk driving charge, Jonas attempts to bribe the officer. The bribe does not work, but Jonas uses personal information fed to him through an earpiece to psychoanalyze the recently divorced policeman, who ends up in tears. Jonas returns to the bus victorious, informing his troupe that the officer even gave him a donation. Soon after, one of the trucks in the caravan breaks down, and the outfit must stop again, this time in the small town of Rustwater, Kansas. They are told they must wait four days for the part needed to fix the truck. Jonas’s assistant Jane rejoices at the much-needed time off, but Jonas insists they put on their show in Rustwater. At a diner, he notices a pretty waitress named Marva, who rebuffs his advances. Afterward, Jane and Jonas go to Sheriff Will Braverman’s office to apply for a permit for their revival show. Braverman refuses, claiming that a drought has left too many people in the farming town unemployed and penniless. Jonas threatens to report the sheriff for obstructing his religious freedom, while Jane flirts with him and persuades Braverman to expedite their paperwork. Jane does research on the town and informs Jonas of its low median income and rampant farm foreclosures. He reminds her they must make $3,500 per show, but she doubts it is possible. Jonas disagrees, saying a town this deep in debt has nowhere to turn but God. Later, swigging liquor from a flask, he touts ... +


Miracles and Wonders, a traveling religious outfit led by crooked evangelist Jonas Nightingale, caravans to its next stop in Topeka, Kansas. When a policeman pulls over Hoover, one of the bus drivers, for an outstanding drunk driving charge, Jonas attempts to bribe the officer. The bribe does not work, but Jonas uses personal information fed to him through an earpiece to psychoanalyze the recently divorced policeman, who ends up in tears. Jonas returns to the bus victorious, informing his troupe that the officer even gave him a donation. Soon after, one of the trucks in the caravan breaks down, and the outfit must stop again, this time in the small town of Rustwater, Kansas. They are told they must wait four days for the part needed to fix the truck. Jonas’s assistant Jane rejoices at the much-needed time off, but Jonas insists they put on their show in Rustwater. At a diner, he notices a pretty waitress named Marva, who rebuffs his advances. Afterward, Jane and Jonas go to Sheriff Will Braverman’s office to apply for a permit for their revival show. Braverman refuses, claiming that a drought has left too many people in the farming town unemployed and penniless. Jonas threatens to report the sheriff for obstructing his religious freedom, while Jane flirts with him and persuades Braverman to expedite their paperwork. Jane does research on the town and informs Jonas of its low median income and rampant farm foreclosures. He reminds her they must make $3,500 per show, but she doubts it is possible. Jonas disagrees, saying a town this deep in debt has nowhere to turn but God. Later, swigging liquor from a flask, he touts Miracles and Wonders on a local radio show. Jonas’s backup gospel choir, the Angels of Mercy, sing hymns in the field as the revival tent is erected, and tables, chairs, and spare crutches are brought inside. Police officers arrive to inspect the structure for violations. Jane spots Sheriff Braverman and offers him a beer. He asks if most cops fall for her act, and she admits they do. Later, Jane goes to Jonas’s motel room and complains that they are not in Topeka, where she planned to see a dog breeder about a Great Dane puppy. Jane admires a gold ring in Jonas’s shaving kit and asks him to give it to her, but he says she will only get it if he dies. On the night of the first show, locals marvel at the lavish setup inside the tent, including a massive crucifix and the big top covered in light-up stars. On the bus, Jane observes the crowd on surveillance screens and makes notes about the attendees on a computerized seating chart. Ushers eavesdrop and pass along pertinent information to her via hidden microphones and earpieces. One of the ushers spots an elderly woman named Emma Schlarp and offers her a wheelchair. The Angels of Mercy start the show with a rousing gospel song. An explosion creates a cloud of smoke onstage, and Jonas emerges. The audience is slow to respond to his antics, but he wins them over with a story about a man who lived in fear before learning to have faith in Jesus Christ. Jonas asks the audience for a sign of their faith as ushers pass around collection buckets. Using the personal information she has collected, Jane directs Jonas to certain audience members, who are amazed when he identifies their personal problems. Jonas calls people to the stage, presses his hands on their heads and says they are healed. An usher wheels Emma Schlarp onstage, and Jonas coaxes her to stand up from her wheelchair. The audience raves as Emma walks across the stage, and Jonas declares it a miracle. After the show, crewmembers retreat to the bus and count the $4,000 they collected in buckets. Sheriff Braverman interrupts, and Jonas runs him off the bus. Braverman reprimands him for conning the people of Rustwater, but Jonas argues that he puts on a good show and gives people hope. Jane intercedes and tells Braverman he owes her a drink. In the morning, Jonas surprises Jane with a puppy, and disapproves when she admits she was out with the sheriff until 2:00 a.m. Jonas returns to the diner where Marva works and meets her younger brother, Boyd, who asks Jonas if he believes in miracles. Jonas claims he has seen many miraculous things, but Boyd tells him that Marva thinks he is a fake. Jonas counters that it makes no difference as long as he “gets the job done.” Jonas finds Marva outside and asks why she gave up on life. She glances back at Boyd, who has arisen from the diner booth on crutches. She tells Jonas that a drunk driver killed her parents and injured Boyd. A preacher once promised to heal him, but when the man could not produce a miracle, he told Boyd his faith wasn’t strong enough. Later, Jonas goes for a run and sees Boyd lifting weights. When Boyd says he will walk again if it is God’s will, Jonas reveals his honest opinion that God will never heal him. At the next show, Jane wanders the audience, asking people questions in confidence. She uses coded language to tip off Jonas to their specific problems, and he provides answers that make him seem clairvoyant. Sheriff Braverman calls to him from the crowd and the music stops. The sheriff says he wants to testify and announces that Jonas’s real name is “Jack Newton.” He goes on to explain that Newton was born in the Bronx, not Appalachia as he claims, and was arrested three times before the age of eighteen. In addition to his early crimes of selling drugs and stealing cars, he has committed fraud and forged checks as an adult. Braverman warns everyone that their money is not going to a man of God, and Jonas storms offstage. As people walk out in disgust, Jonas returns and proclaims that everything Braverman said was true. He gives a rehearsed speech about how he was saved from his life of crime by Jesus, and wins back the audience. Later, the sheriff goes to Jane’s motel room, and she defends Jonas, who was abandoned by his single mother and raised in an orphanage. She says he is only selling fairytales. Later, Jonas retrieves some art supplies and goes to the crucifix inside the tent. The next day, locals discover that the statue of Jesus Christ on the crucifix has miraculously transformed – its eyes are now open instead of closed. Television news crews arrive to report the “miracle.” Preparing for the next show, Jane warns Jonas that very sick people will be coming, and he instructs her to sit them in the back of the tent so they cannot reach the stage. She admits she has been losing sleep over her concern for the people they have exploited, but Jonas reminds her that she is still taking their money. She goes to Braverman’s house, and he suggests she settle down with him in Rustwater. However, Jane claims she doesn’t want to slow down. At that night’s show, Boyd asks to be healed, but Jonas ignores him and walks offstage. The crowd chants for him to come back and heal Boyd. Against his will, Jonas returns, and watches as Boyd approaches the crucifix. Boyd touches the statue’s feet, his crutches fall away, and he stumbles. Jonas declares everyone in the crowd must have faith, pointing to Sheriff Braverman. Suddenly, Boyd walks without crutches and Marva rushes to the stage to embrace her brother. Jonas recovers from his shock to announce that another miracle has taken place. Afterward, Jonas returns to the bus in a huff. He tells Jane that Marva and Boyd must be con artists themselves, but Jane disagrees. She urges Jonas to accept that something miraculous just happened, but discourages him from exploiting Boyd in future shows. Alone in the tent, Jonas shouts at the crucifix. Boyd appears, credits Jonas with his healing, and asks to join Miracles and Wonders. Jonas confesses to being a fraud, but Boyd repeats what Jonas said earlier, asking, “What difference does it make if you get the job done?” That night, Jonas packs his bags and hitchhikes a ride to Florida. As he rides away, it begins to rain and Jonas laughs joyfully, amazed that the drought has ended. After spending the night with her, Braverman drives Jane back to the motel. She smiles when she discovers a goodbye note that Jonas left her, along with the gold ring she coveted. Meanwhile, tailgaters outside the revival tent embrace each other and praise the rain. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.