Love Crimes (1992)

R | 84 mins | Drama | 24 January 1992

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HISTORY

An item in the 3 Feb 1990 Screen International announced that Lizzie Borden would direct Love Crimes, with Sean Young and Liam Neeson set to co-star. Filming was initially scheduled to begin in May 1990. However, Neeson dropped out, and was replaced by Patrick Bergin, whose casting was confirmed in a 14 May 1990 DV brief. The film was cited as one of nine upcoming productions from the eighteen-month-old Sovereign Pictures, backed by a recently extended revolving credit line from Mercantile National Bank and Credit Lyonnais, as stated in the 19 Sep 1990 DV. By mid-May 1990, Miramax Films was in negotiations to acquire domestic distribution rights. The film was ultimately released under Miramax’s Millimeter Films label, as noted in contemporary reviews. However, onscreen credits in the home video version viewed by AFI list Miramax as the distributor.
       Principal photography began either 6 Aug or 13 Aug 1990, according to conflicting reports in the 10 Aug and 31 Aug 1990 HR. The first six weeks of production took place in Atlanta, GA, and the final week was shot in Savannah, GA, concluding on 4 Oct 1990, as stated in the 10 Oct 1990 DV. End credits also list Dallas, TX, crewmembers, but it is unclear when filming in Dallas took place. Although Miramax initially planned to release the film in late spring 1991, an extended post-production phase delayed theatrical release until 24 Jan 1992.
       The 10 Oct 1990 DV stated that jazz saxophonist Wayne Shorter would compose the score, but Shorter only receives cast credit as a member of the “Jazz quartet” seen ... More Less

An item in the 3 Feb 1990 Screen International announced that Lizzie Borden would direct Love Crimes, with Sean Young and Liam Neeson set to co-star. Filming was initially scheduled to begin in May 1990. However, Neeson dropped out, and was replaced by Patrick Bergin, whose casting was confirmed in a 14 May 1990 DV brief. The film was cited as one of nine upcoming productions from the eighteen-month-old Sovereign Pictures, backed by a recently extended revolving credit line from Mercantile National Bank and Credit Lyonnais, as stated in the 19 Sep 1990 DV. By mid-May 1990, Miramax Films was in negotiations to acquire domestic distribution rights. The film was ultimately released under Miramax’s Millimeter Films label, as noted in contemporary reviews. However, onscreen credits in the home video version viewed by AFI list Miramax as the distributor.
       Principal photography began either 6 Aug or 13 Aug 1990, according to conflicting reports in the 10 Aug and 31 Aug 1990 HR. The first six weeks of production took place in Atlanta, GA, and the final week was shot in Savannah, GA, concluding on 4 Oct 1990, as stated in the 10 Oct 1990 DV. End credits also list Dallas, TX, crewmembers, but it is unclear when filming in Dallas took place. Although Miramax initially planned to release the film in late spring 1991, an extended post-production phase delayed theatrical release until 24 Jan 1992.
       The 10 Oct 1990 DV stated that jazz saxophonist Wayne Shorter would compose the score, but Shorter only receives cast credit as a member of the “Jazz quartet” seen in the film.
       Critical reception was mixed. Several reviews pointed out nonsensical gaps in the storyline, including the 27 Jan 1992 DV, which detailed the following problematic omissions: “One minute, [Sean] Young’s locked in a closet…then suddenly she’s nude in a bathtub trying to seduce [Patrick] Bergin. Immediately thereafter, he’s become so lax that she’s waving around a loaded gun at him.” The jarring cuts were later explained, in the 9 Jul 1992 NYT and 10 Jul 1992 LAT, as a response to negative feedback from test audiences and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which threatened to give the film an NC-17 rating if filmmakers did not remove eight minutes of footage, including Sean Young’s full frontal nudity. Lizzie Borden lamented that the edits rendered the narrative nonsensical in parts, but claimed the budget was too high to justify a limited NC-17 release. The excised footage was later re-inserted into an unrated home video version released by Home Box Office (HBO), in addition to the R-rated home video version.
       As noted in a 2 Mar 1992 Var box-office chart, the film took in a paltry $2,320,217 in its first six weeks of release.
       End credits include “Special Thanks” to: Prentiss Yancey; By Design of Atlanta (International furniture); Cerutti; Anne Klein; Mercantile National Bank; The Studios at Las Colinas; The Ambassador Hotel; Georgia Film Commission; North Dallas Film Commission; Irving Film Commission; the Police Departments of Atlanta, Georgia; Savannah, Georgia; and Irving, Texas; Jeffrey Bloom; David McDavid Pontiac; Steve Ogden; and Michael Schremp. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 May 1990
p. 1, 15.
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1990.
---
Daily Variety
10 Oct 1990.
---
Daily Variety
27 Jan 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 1992
p. 11, 62.
Los Angeles Times
27 Jan 1992
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jul 1992
Calendar, p. 22.
New York Times
26 Jan 1992
p. 43.
New York Times
9 Jul 1992
Section C, p. 20.
Screen International
3 Feb 1990.
---
Variety
2 Feb 1992
p. 79.
Variety
2 Mar 1992.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Sovereign Pictures
In Association With Millimeter Films
A Film By Lizzie Borden
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr, Atlanta crew
1st asst dir, Atlanta crew
2d asst dir, Atlanta crew
2d 2d asst dir, Atlanta crew
Unit prod mgr/1st asst dir, Dallas crew
2d asst dir, Dallas crew
2d 2d asst dir, Dallas crew
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod, Atlanta crew
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
David Hanover's photographs, b & w by
David Hanover's photographs, color Polaroids by
Addl photog, Atlanta crew
1st asst cam, Atlanta crew
2d asst cam, Atlanta crew
Key grip, Atlanta crew
Best boy grip, Atlanta crew
Dolly grip, Atlanta crew
Company grip, Atlanta crew
Company grip, Atlanta crew
Gaffer, Atlanta crew
Best boy elec, Atlanta crew
Elec, Atlanta crew
Elec, Atlanta crew
Addl elec, Atlanta crew
Addl elec, Atlanta crew
Addl elec, Atlanta crew
Addl elec, Atlanta crew
Addl elec, Atlanta crew
Still photog, Atlanta crew
Addl dir of photog, Dallas crew
1st asst cam, Dallas crew
Video assist, Dallas crew
Key grip, Dallas crew
Best boy grip, Dallas crew
Dolly grip, Dallas crew
Grip, Dallas crew
Gaffer, Dallas crew
Best boy elec, Dallas crew
Elec, Dallas crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, Atlanta crew
Art dept coord, Atlanta crew
Art dir, Dallas crew
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec, Atlanta crew
Leadperson, Atlanta crew
Set dresser, Atlanta crew
Set dresser, Atlanta crew
Prop master, Atlanta crew
Prop asst, Atlanta crew
Swing gang, Atlanta crew
Swing gang, Atlanta crew
Const coord, Atlanta crew
Const foreman, Atlanta crew
Carpenter, Atlanta crew
Carpenter, Atlanta crew
Carpenter foreman/Savannah
Carpenter's asst, Atlanta crew
Stand-by scenic, Atlanta crew
1st asst scenic, Atlanta crew
Set dec, Dallas crew
Leadman, Dallas crew
Prop master, Dallas crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des
Ward supv, Atlanta crew
Asst ward supv, Atlanta crew
Ward asst, Atlanta crew
Ward asst, Atlanta crew
Ward supv, Dallas crew
Asst ward supv, Dallas crew
MUSIC
Addl mus
Mus ed
Scoring synchronization
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd mixer, Dallas crew
Boom op, Dallas crew
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd ed
Sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Foley/ADR mixer
ADR group coord
Foley artist
Foley artist
Audio post prod facilities
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff, Atlanta crew
Spec eff coord, Dallas crew
Titles & opticals by
MAKEUP
Make-up artist, Atlanta crew
Make-up asst, Atlanta crew
Hair stylist, Atlanta crew
Make-up artist, Dallas crew
Hair stylist, Dallas crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod asst/Office, Atlanta
Prod asst/Office, Savannah
Prod asst/Set, Atlanta crew
Prod asst/Set, Atlanta crew
Atlanta casting/Extras
Atlanta casting/Extras
Savannah casting/Extras
Savannah casting/Extras
Unit pub, Atlanta crew
Loc mgr, Atlanta crew
Asst locs/Atlanta
Asst locs/Savannah
Police coord, Atlanta crew
Prod asst, Atlanta crew
Prod asst, Atlanta crew
Prod asst, Atlanta crew
Transportation coord, Atlanta crew
Transportation capt, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Driver, Atlanta crew
Craft service, Atlanta crew
First aid/Atlanta
First aid/Savannah
Caterer, Atlanta crew
Caterer, Location Catering of the South, Atlanta c
Caterer, Location Catering of the South, Atlanta c
Asst to Lizzie Borden, Atlanta crew
Travel services provided by, Atlanta crew
Unit mgr, Dallas crew
Asst prod coord, Dallas crew
Prod accountant, Dallas crew
Asst to the prod, Dallas crew
Casting, Dallas crew
Transportation coord, Dallas crew
Prod driver, Dallas crew
Prod asst, Dallas crew
Prod asst, Dallas crew
Prod asst, Dallas crew
Intern, Dallas crew
Intern, Dallas crew
Intern, Dallas crew
Craft service, Dallas crew
Catering provided by, Dallas crew
Catering provided by, Dallas crew
Travel services provided by, Dallas crew
Prod exec
Post prod supv
Post prod accounting
Payroll
Completion bond
Loc equip by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt double for Patrick Bergin
Stunt double for Patrick Bergin
Stunt double for Sean Young
Stunt double for Sean Young
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Yodelling In The Valley," written and performed by Patrick Bergin
"Simple Gifts," traditional, performed by Sean Young, Danielle Shuman.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 January 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 January 1992
Production Date:
early/mid August--4 October 1990
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
84
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31582
SYNOPSIS

In Atlanta, Georgia, Assistant District Attorney Dana Greenway investigates “David Hanover,” a sex offender who poses as a well-known photographer to lure women into pornographic photo shoots and have sex with them. By complimenting their beauty and making false promises about their modeling potential, Hanover gains access to his victims’ homes, forces them to pose naked, intimidates them, then consoles them. The harrowing experience leaves the women vulnerable to his sexual advances; thus, they consent to having sex with him, only to regret it later. Dana speaks with Anne Winslow, Hanover’s latest victim, who believes she was raped. Dana laments that they cannot charge Hanover with rape if Anne gave her consent in the moment. However, Anne mentions that Hanover borrowed her car and never returned it; therefore, Dana can charge him with “theft by deception.” Another victim is reported in Savannah, Georgia. Although Dana has been warned by her superiors not to interfere with police work, she goes to Savannah to pursue Hanover, herself. Savannah Police Chief Ellis allows her to develop a roll of film found at the crime scene. At the photo laboratory, Dana encounters Hanover, whom she recognizes from a police sketch. She pretends to be a flirtatious schoolteacher interested in his photographs, and he invites her to dinner. At the restaurant, however, Hanover suspects her of lying about her identity. When his credit card is rejected, Dana pays for dinner with cash. He offers to make it up to her by taking her photograph. They go back to Dana’s hotel room, where Hanover rifles through her things, confirms that she is lying about her identity, and flees. Dana follows him to his secluded lakeside ... +


In Atlanta, Georgia, Assistant District Attorney Dana Greenway investigates “David Hanover,” a sex offender who poses as a well-known photographer to lure women into pornographic photo shoots and have sex with them. By complimenting their beauty and making false promises about their modeling potential, Hanover gains access to his victims’ homes, forces them to pose naked, intimidates them, then consoles them. The harrowing experience leaves the women vulnerable to his sexual advances; thus, they consent to having sex with him, only to regret it later. Dana speaks with Anne Winslow, Hanover’s latest victim, who believes she was raped. Dana laments that they cannot charge Hanover with rape if Anne gave her consent in the moment. However, Anne mentions that Hanover borrowed her car and never returned it; therefore, Dana can charge him with “theft by deception.” Another victim is reported in Savannah, Georgia. Although Dana has been warned by her superiors not to interfere with police work, she goes to Savannah to pursue Hanover, herself. Savannah Police Chief Ellis allows her to develop a roll of film found at the crime scene. At the photo laboratory, Dana encounters Hanover, whom she recognizes from a police sketch. She pretends to be a flirtatious schoolteacher interested in his photographs, and he invites her to dinner. At the restaurant, however, Hanover suspects her of lying about her identity. When his credit card is rejected, Dana pays for dinner with cash. He offers to make it up to her by taking her photograph. They go back to Dana’s hotel room, where Hanover rifles through her things, confirms that she is lying about her identity, and flees. Dana follows him to his secluded lakeside cabin fifty miles away. He catches her creeping outside the house and holds her captive in an empty closet, where Dana is haunted by childhood memories of being locked in a closet by her father, after spying on his illicit sexual affairs. As Hanover speaks to her through the locked door, Dana threatens to send him to jail for criminal impersonation, fraud, sexual battery, and rape. He remains undaunted, and suggests that she followed him for personal reasons. The next day, police detective Maria Johnson learns that Dana, her best friend, has gone missing, and travels to Savannah in search of her. Meanwhile, Hanover handcuffs Dana to his couch and cuts off her clothing with scissors. He challenges her to punish him by pressing a lit cigarette into his hand, but she refuses. That afternoon, he removes her restraints, takes her for a canoe ride, and brings her back to his home. Rattled by his sudden kindness, Dana demands to know what he wants from her, but he responds by asking what she wants. She admits that she hates herself and dislikes being touched, although she has an ongoing sexual relationship with her boss, Stanton Gray. He follows her inside and takes Polaroid photographs of her naked in the bath. Although he allows her access to her gun, she ignores it. Instead, she fantasizes about having sex with him, and allows him to give her a massage. When he stops short, she gets angry, retrieves her gun, and forces him into the passenger seat of his car. Hanover obliges by handcuffing himself to the car door. Driving into town, he admits that he began compulsively lying when he was only six years old. When Dana stops to use a payphone, Hanover frees himself and speeds away. Meanwhile, with the help of Detective Eugene Tully, Maria finds Hanover’s cabin and discovers the Polaroids of Dana, who appears to be a willing subject. Hanover’s next victim is a wealthy woman who takes him to her mansion for an equestrian-themed photo shoot. However, he loses interest in the midst of his abusive photography ritual and leaves before they have sex. Back in Atlanta, Dana claims that Hanover kidnapped her. He sees her story on the front page of a newspaper, and calls to arrange a meeting at a bar. Dana organizes police backup and goes to the meeting spot, but Hanover senses that she has set him up and flees. Dana’s boss and lover, Stanton Gray, reprimands her for “crying wolf” and suspends her. She defiantly quits. The next day, Maria informs her that Hanover was caught somewhere near Valdosta, Georgia. Dana takes a long shower, recalling the time her mother found her locked in the closet. She emerges from the shower just as Maria leaves an answering machine message, warning that the wrong man was arrested and Hanover is still on the loose. The power goes out, and Dana discovers Hanover on her couch. She reaches for her hidden gun, but he has already taken it. Hanover hides the gun under the couch and pursues Dana with his camera, photographing her against her will. She panics, falls to the floor, and suffers another flashback to the time her father accidentally shot and killed her mother during a tussle. In a stupor, she hits Hanover over the head with a glass bowl. Police arrive, and Hanover is arrested. Internal affairs investigators speak with Maria about Dana’s involvement in Hanover’s case. Despite Hanover’s claims of entrapment, Maria insists that Dana did what she had to do to get a conviction. They ask if Dana might be hiding anything that could incriminate her, but Maria assures them she is not. Elsewhere, Dana burns the Polaroids Hanover took of her in the bath. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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