Bound by Honor (1993)

R | 180 mins | Drama | 30 April 1993

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HISTORY

According to the 7 Aug 1988 LAT, which referred to the film as Blood In, Blood Out, Edward James Olmos would make his directorial debut and actors Andy Garcia and Lou Diamond Phillips would star. The 11 Dec 1988 LAT reported that actor Sean Penn had been hired, however, none of these people participated in the final production.
       Principal photography began in May 1991, despite an earlier report in the 7 Aug 1988 LAT of a fall 1988 start date.
       A caterer was wounded during production when the crew was fired upon by gang members in a drive-by shooting, according to the 20 May 1991 HR. The shooting occurred in El Sereno, CA, when crew members were taking down a set in the early morning. The twenty-seven-year-old victim was shot in the shoulder and taken to the hospital in serious condition.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filmmakers were granted unprecedented approval to film inside San Quentin State Prison. Several restrictions were instituted for crewmembers’ security during filming in an operating prison. They were told not to wear the color blue so they could be easily identified as part of the crew and not mistaken for prisoners. 350 inmates were selected as background actors. Locations also included sound stages at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood, CA, where a prison block was built, and several jails including Simi Valley, the Wayside Honor Rancho in Castaic, CA, and Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles.
       The 20 Nov 1992 DV reported a Feb 1993 release date, following a yearlong delay due to riots in ... More Less

According to the 7 Aug 1988 LAT, which referred to the film as Blood In, Blood Out, Edward James Olmos would make his directorial debut and actors Andy Garcia and Lou Diamond Phillips would star. The 11 Dec 1988 LAT reported that actor Sean Penn had been hired, however, none of these people participated in the final production.
       Principal photography began in May 1991, despite an earlier report in the 7 Aug 1988 LAT of a fall 1988 start date.
       A caterer was wounded during production when the crew was fired upon by gang members in a drive-by shooting, according to the 20 May 1991 HR. The shooting occurred in El Sereno, CA, when crew members were taking down a set in the early morning. The twenty-seven-year-old victim was shot in the shoulder and taken to the hospital in serious condition.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, filmmakers were granted unprecedented approval to film inside San Quentin State Prison. Several restrictions were instituted for crewmembers’ security during filming in an operating prison. They were told not to wear the color blue so they could be easily identified as part of the crew and not mistaken for prisoners. 350 inmates were selected as background actors. Locations also included sound stages at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood, CA, where a prison block was built, and several jails including Simi Valley, the Wayside Honor Rancho in Castaic, CA, and Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles.
       The 20 Nov 1992 DV reported a Feb 1993 release date, following a yearlong delay due to riots in Los Angeles.
       The picture was renamed, Bound By Honor, in response to market tests, as noted in the 20 Mar 1993 LAT. However, Taylor Hackford was granted approval to use his original title, Blood In, Blood Out, for the home video release.
       The picture was released nationally on thirty screens on 30 Apr 1993, but delayed in the Los Angeles markets until 21 May 1993, when the Rodney King civil rights trial verdict was to be handed down, according to the 6 May 1993 HR. The city feared a repeat of the 1992 riots following the acquittal of four Los Angeles Police Department officers charged with beating King. Box-office sales totaled $1 million from 391 theatres on opening weekend. Distributors did not plan to expand the release further, as crossover appeal to non-Hispanic audiences was not apparent.
       End credits conclude with the following title card: “The bloody era of prison gang warfare, which characterized much of California’s prison system during the decade depicted in this film, is now under control.” Additional acknowledgements include: “The Producers Wish to Thank: The community of East Los Angeles; State of California, Dept. of Corrections; James Gomez, Director of Corrections; Tip Kindel, Assistant Director of Communications; San Quentin State Prison, Damiel B. Vasquez, Warden; The staff and inmates of San Quentin Prison; Jane Blumenfeld and the staff of the Office of the Mayor of the City of Los Angeles; Harvey D. Kern and LAC-USC Medical Center; The Xipe Totec Aztec Dancers; Los Angeles County High School for the Arts; The Pico Aliso Housing Development; Self Help Graphics; SEA Project – Dolores Mission; Peter Pitchess Honor Ranch; Honorable Richard Alatorre; United Neighborhood Organization – Rebecca Gifford; Major Jerry Broeckert, U.S. Marine Corps.” The surname of scenic artist Gordon H. Germaine is misspelled onscreen as "Germain." Additionally, cast member Lindsey Ginter's name is misspelled as "Lindsay Ginter." More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 May 1991.
---
Daily Variety
20 Nov 1992.
---
Daily Variety
22 Jan 1993
p. 4, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 1993
p. 5, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 1993
p. 3, 16.
Los Angeles Times
7 Aug 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Dec 1988.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Mar 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Apr 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
5 Nov 1993.
---
New York Times
30 Apr 1993
p. 8.
Screen International
26 Apr 1991.
---
Variety
25 Jan 1993
p. 133.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Hollywood Pictures presents
In association with Touchwood Pacific Partners I
A Taylor Hackford film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
Cam loader
Steadicam op
Video asst op
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy
Elec
Best boy
Dolly grip
Dir of photog, Addl photog
1st asst cam, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
Gaffer, Addl photog
Aerial photog
Pilot, Aerial photog, Cinema Air
Cranes & dollies supplied by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
2d art dir
Art dept coord
Illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Ed consultant
Addl film ed
Addl film ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
On set dresser
Standby painter
Const coord
Foreman
Lead scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Interior prison set const by
COSTUMES
Cost des
Assoc cost des
Ward supv
Asst costumer
Men's costumer
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
Orch by
Orch contractor
Lead guitarist
Lead trumpet
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
ADR rec
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR and foley rec by
Supv ADR ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff cord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff coord, Addl photog
Title des
Optical supv
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Head makeup artist
Key makeup
Makeup
Makeup
Head hair supv
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
Key hairstylist, Addl photog
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Cruz paintings by
Prison tech adv
Tattoo des
2d tattooist
Tattoo process
Scr supv
Asst to Taylor Hackford
Asst to Stratton Leopold
Casting asst
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst loc mgr
LAPD coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Day of the Dead consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Pub & marketing consultant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Craft service
Craft service
First aid
Community tech adv
Gang coord
Actor's security
Extra casting, Los Angeles Casting Express, Inc.
Warden, San Quentin staff
Staff coord, San Quentin staff
Chief Deputy Warden, San Quentin staff
Public Information Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Correctional Officer, San Quentin staff
Transportation coord, Addl photog
Prison art provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Stunt team
Prosthetics double
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Como Un Perro,” written by Severo Miron and Blanca Medel Calvez, performed by Chelo Silva, courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment Mexico, S.A. DE C.V., by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“K'in Sventa Ch'ul Me'tik Kwadalupe,” from the album Mexico: Fiestas of Chiapas and Oaxaca, recorded by David Lewiston, courtesy of Elektra Nonesuch, by arrangement with Warner Special Products: “Low Rider,” written by Jerry Goldstein, Lonnie Jordan, Howard Scott, Lee Oskar, Harold Brown, Thomas Allen, Charles Miller and Morris Dickerson, performed by War, courtesy of Far Out Music, by arrangement with Sounds of Film
“Jin-Go-Lo-Ba,” written by Michael Olatunji, performed by Santana, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
+
SONGS
“Como Un Perro,” written by Severo Miron and Blanca Medel Calvez, performed by Chelo Silva, courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment Mexico, S.A. DE C.V., by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“K'in Sventa Ch'ul Me'tik Kwadalupe,” from the album Mexico: Fiestas of Chiapas and Oaxaca, recorded by David Lewiston, courtesy of Elektra Nonesuch, by arrangement with Warner Special Products: “Low Rider,” written by Jerry Goldstein, Lonnie Jordan, Howard Scott, Lee Oskar, Harold Brown, Thomas Allen, Charles Miller and Morris Dickerson, performed by War, courtesy of Far Out Music, by arrangement with Sounds of Film
“Jin-Go-Lo-Ba,” written by Michael Olatunji, performed by Santana, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“That Lady,” written by Ernie Isley, Marvin Isley, Ronald Isley, Rudolph Isley, O'Kelly Isley and Chris Jasper, performed by The Isley Brothers, courtesy of Sony Music, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
“Searchin' For My Love,” written by Bobby Moore, performed by Bobby Moore and the Rhythm Aces, courtesy of MCA Records
“Try Me,” written by James Brown, performed by James Brown, courtesy of PolyGram Special Markets
“Take Me To The River,” written by Al Green and Mabon Hodges, performed by Al Green, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
“Little Wing,” written and performed by Jimi Hendrix, courtesy of Elber B.V.
“597-59,” written by Joseph Jarman, performed by the Art Ensemble of Chicago, courtesy of ECM Records
“Cafe,” written by Arcalio Garcia, Pablo Tellez and Jorge Santana, performed by Malo, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Slippin' Into Darkness,” written by Lonnie Jordan, Howard Scott, Lee Oskar, Harold Brown, Thomas Allen, Charles Miller and Morris Dickerson, performed by War, courtesy of Far Out Music, by arrangement with Sounds of Film
“Superfreak,” written by Rick James and Alonzo Miller, performed by Rick James, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P.. by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
“Mal Hombre,” written by Roger Velasquez.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Blood In, Blood Out
Release Date:
30 April 1993
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 30 April 1993
Los Angeles opening: 21 May 1993
Production Date:
began May 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Hollywood Pictures Company
Copyright Date:
7 May 1993
Copyright Number:
PA611000
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Arriflex 535 cameras and lenses provided by Otto Nemenz
Prints
Produced and distributed on Eastman Film
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
180
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32241
SYNOPSIS

In 1972, Miklo Velka returns home to the Mexican-American barrio in East Los Angles, California, after living with his Caucasian father in Las Vegas, Nevada, for eighteen months. He reunites with his Mexican mother and cousins Paco Aguilar and Cruz Candelaria days before his eighteenth birthday. Miklo constantly fights the stigma of being a blond, blue-eyed Mexican. Seeing a gang painting graffiti in his neighborhood, he demonstrates his toughness by sneaking up and smashing their car window. Later, Cruz Candelaria wins an art competition, and is awarded a scholarship to the Los Angeles College of Art and Design. When Cruz drives a girl to a secluded area for lovemaking, the graffiti-painting gang members, led by Spider, pull him from the car and beat him so badly that he is taken to the hospital in grave condition. Paco and Miklo assemble their gang to retaliate. On a hillside in the daytime, Paco stabs Spider repeatedly and carves his gang initials into Spider’s chest, but is stopped by Miklo from shooting him. However, as the cousins leave, Spider shoots at them and wounds Miklo, who returns fire and kills him. Paco races Miklo to the hospital in his automobile, prompting police officers to give chase. Paco crashes during the pursuit, and both are arrested, but only Miklo is charged with Spider’s murder. After being convicted, Miklo is sent to San Quentin State Prison in Northern California. Elsewhere, Cruz is released from the hospital, but walks with a cane as a result of his injuries. He is surprised when his stepbrother, Paco, greets him wearing a U.S. Marine Corps uniform, and explains that he enlisted to avoid going to prison. Meanwhile, in ... +


In 1972, Miklo Velka returns home to the Mexican-American barrio in East Los Angles, California, after living with his Caucasian father in Las Vegas, Nevada, for eighteen months. He reunites with his Mexican mother and cousins Paco Aguilar and Cruz Candelaria days before his eighteenth birthday. Miklo constantly fights the stigma of being a blond, blue-eyed Mexican. Seeing a gang painting graffiti in his neighborhood, he demonstrates his toughness by sneaking up and smashing their car window. Later, Cruz Candelaria wins an art competition, and is awarded a scholarship to the Los Angeles College of Art and Design. When Cruz drives a girl to a secluded area for lovemaking, the graffiti-painting gang members, led by Spider, pull him from the car and beat him so badly that he is taken to the hospital in grave condition. Paco and Miklo assemble their gang to retaliate. On a hillside in the daytime, Paco stabs Spider repeatedly and carves his gang initials into Spider’s chest, but is stopped by Miklo from shooting him. However, as the cousins leave, Spider shoots at them and wounds Miklo, who returns fire and kills him. Paco races Miklo to the hospital in his automobile, prompting police officers to give chase. Paco crashes during the pursuit, and both are arrested, but only Miklo is charged with Spider’s murder. After being convicted, Miklo is sent to San Quentin State Prison in Northern California. Elsewhere, Cruz is released from the hospital, but walks with a cane as a result of his injuries. He is surprised when his stepbrother, Paco, greets him wearing a U.S. Marine Corps uniform, and explains that he enlisted to avoid going to prison. Meanwhile, in San Quentin, Miklo meets fellow inmate “Chuey,” whom he knows from the barrio, and learns about the various racial gangs that run the prison. When Chuey tries to stab Miklo, he is stopped by gang leader Montana Segura. Miklo wants to join Montana’s gang, but his white skin presents an obstacle for acceptance. He offers to prove his loyalty by killing Montana’s nemesis, kitchen manager Big Al. Elsewhere, Cruz resumes painting, and after getting a gallery exhibition, he sells all his canvases on opening night. However, he embarrasses the gallery owner by showing up “stoned” with his friends and causing a scene. After befriending Big Al and getting a job in the prison kitchen, Miklo enters the storeroom and finds him engaging in a gambling scheme with a prison guard named Bob. As soon as Bob leaves, Miklo stabs Big Al, and takes the money and notebook ledger. Afterward, Miklo threatens to turn Bob over to the warden if he retaliates. In Los Angeles, Cruz begins using heroin to treat the pain from his back injury. His younger brother, Juanito, finds him passed out. Emulating his older brother, he injects himself with one of Cruz’s needles and dies of an overdose. Cruz’s family, including Paco, disowns him. Meanwhile, Miklo is accepted into the Mexican gang, and they take over running Big Al’s gambling business. Over the years, the Mexicans become more powerful in prison, and Miklo is respected as one of the “top dogs.” Montana invests their profits in drug businesses outside prison to expand their gains. By 1980, Paco has become a Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) narcotics officer, and works undercover to bust drug dealers. When Miklo is denied parole, Montana encourages him to earn his release. He begins studying, and after passing his G.E.D. high school equivalency exam, Miklo appeals again to the parole board, and is granted an early release. After nine years of incarceration, he returns home in 1982, and reunites with Cruz. Miklo moves into a halfway house with former inmate “Popeye,” and tries to work a respectable job at a tire factory, but his life depresses him. He is surprised to learn Paco has become a “narc.” He rejects Paco’s offer to help him rebuild his life, and confides to Cruz that he was making more money in prison. Soon, Miklo agrees to participate in an armored car heist for some thugs when he learns that Cruz owes them money. When Miklo excludes Popeye from the deal, the parolee takes revenge by tipping off police. Paco and his partner investigate, and witness several masked men robbing an armored truck. A shootout ensues, and Paco chases a robber on foot. As the officer overtakes the robber, Miklo removes his mask, tells Paco that he owes him for taking the rap for Spider’s death, and flees despite Paco’s warnings. Paco shoots him in the leg, and Miklo loses it in the hospital. Sent back to San Quentin with a prosthetic leg, he learns that the white gang has taken over the prison drug and gambling business. After seven years of silence, Paco visits Cruz, who insults him for shooting Miklo. Meanwhile, Miklo argues with Montana Segura about how to regain power, but Montana has lost his aggression. He has written an essay on prison reform, and has been asked to write a book on Chicanos in prison. Going behind Montana’s back, Miklo recruits an inmate named “Magic Mike.” They wait for the right time to make their move, while fighting escalates between the black and white gangs. When Miklo appeals to Montana that they need to strike, the leader demands they speak to the Mexican council before making a move. Meanwhile, a thug named Smokey asks Paco for protection when his life is threatened. Paco agrees to help in exchange for information on the prison drug-running scheme, but when he arrives at their meeting, Smokey has been murdered. San Quentin Prison Lieutenant Ivan Burnett arrives in Los Angeles to work with Paco on the investigation. Meanwhile, having receiving approval from the council, Montana offers the Mexican gang’s assistance to black leader Bonafide, and agrees to visit a prison in Chino and put an end to the Mexican violence against the black gangs there. Montana leaves Miklo in charge, and shares his excitement that he will get to see his daughter for the first time in fourteen years while en route. Montana spends the night at a jail midway to Chino, but as he prepares for his daughter’s visit, he is stabbed to death by an elderly black inmate named Wallace. During the subsequent investigation, Wallace claims he made the hit after receiving a secret message from Bonafide inside a wooden hair comb. Meanwhile, chaos erupts in San Quentin as inmates riot. Miklo orders his men not to join in, because prison guards will kill them. Bonafide is stunned to hear that Wallace believes he sent the message to kill Montana. Paco visits Miklo in prison to implore him not to retaliate against the black gang. Bonafide appeals to Miklo to continue their alliance, claiming the white gang set him up. Miklo tells Bonafide they will wait six-months, and then attack the white inmates when they least expect it. Paco and the prison warden are relieved at the apparent peaceful resolution. Six months later, on the Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos, Cruz mourns at the grave of his brother, and his parents finally offer their forgiveness. Meanwhile, in San Quentin, black and Mexican inmates systematically attack and kill several white gang members. Afterward, the Mexicans turn on the blacks and kill several, including Bonafide. The news media reports that seventeen inmates were killed. Paco accuses Miklo of orchestrating Montana’s murder in order to start the gang war, and Miklo argues that many Chicano lives were saved as a result. Paco is ashamed of him, and refuses Miklo’s request to work together on illegal ventures. When the prison tries to break apart the Mexican gang by transferring several inmates to other prisons, Miklo orders his men to start gang charters in their new prisons to expand their power. Magic Mike reveals the soap mold he made of Bonafide’s hair comb, and gives it to Miklo to destroy. The men express their love for Montana, and regret killing him to regain power. Magic Mike vows his life to Miklo as his “Hefe.” Outside the prison, in 1984, Cruz celebrates finally being free of heroin, and encourages Paco to make peace with Miklo, claiming family is all they have. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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