Married to It (1993)

R | 112 mins | Comedy-drama | 26 March 1993

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HISTORY

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, screenwriter and associate producer Janet Kovalcik wrote the script for Married to It while in France during the summer of 1989. That fall, the 25 Oct 1989 DV announced that Orion Pictures had acquired the property, at which point producer Thomas Baer helped Kovalcik and executive producer John L. Jacobs revise the script. Once director Arthur Hiller joined the project, rehearsals were held in Jun 1990, and principal photography began 30 Jul 1990 in New York City.
       In mid-Aug 1990, production relocated to Toronto, Canada, where interiors were matched with exterior New York locations. The sixty-five locations used in the film included Casa Loma, which doubled as the mayor’s mansion; two Toronto private schools; and the lobby of the O’Keefe Centre performing arts hall, which served as the New York State Theater. According to the 24 Aug 1990 NYT, filming was scheduled to conclude mid-Oct 1990.
       A 29 Aug 1991 DV brief reported that the film premiered 10 Sep 1991 at the Directors Guild of America Theater in West Hollywood, CA, as part of an American Cinematheque weekend retrospective honoring Arthur Hiller’s career. The film also screened 11 Sep 1991 at the Toronto Festival of Festivals, and a Sep 1991 Us magazine advertisement suggested that a theatrical release was set for some time that same month.
       However, on 11 Oct 1991, LAT reported that Orion was unable to publicize the film properly due to outstanding financial difficulties. As a result, billboard advertisements were replaced with promotional materials for Orion’s other upcoming release, Little Man Tate (1991, see ... More Less

According to production notes in AMPAS library files, screenwriter and associate producer Janet Kovalcik wrote the script for Married to It while in France during the summer of 1989. That fall, the 25 Oct 1989 DV announced that Orion Pictures had acquired the property, at which point producer Thomas Baer helped Kovalcik and executive producer John L. Jacobs revise the script. Once director Arthur Hiller joined the project, rehearsals were held in Jun 1990, and principal photography began 30 Jul 1990 in New York City.
       In mid-Aug 1990, production relocated to Toronto, Canada, where interiors were matched with exterior New York locations. The sixty-five locations used in the film included Casa Loma, which doubled as the mayor’s mansion; two Toronto private schools; and the lobby of the O’Keefe Centre performing arts hall, which served as the New York State Theater. According to the 24 Aug 1990 NYT, filming was scheduled to conclude mid-Oct 1990.
       A 29 Aug 1991 DV brief reported that the film premiered 10 Sep 1991 at the Directors Guild of America Theater in West Hollywood, CA, as part of an American Cinematheque weekend retrospective honoring Arthur Hiller’s career. The film also screened 11 Sep 1991 at the Toronto Festival of Festivals, and a Sep 1991 Us magazine advertisement suggested that a theatrical release was set for some time that same month.
       However, on 11 Oct 1991, LAT reported that Orion was unable to publicize the film properly due to outstanding financial difficulties. As a result, billboard advertisements were replaced with promotional materials for Orion’s other upcoming release, Little Man Tate (1991, see entry). The 18 Nov 1991 Var included Married to It as one of twelve Orion films that were postponed while the company followed through with restructuring plans, which included consolidating the New York City offices and relocating to Los Angeles, CA. Marketing and distribution costs were estimated at $10 million for each of the twelve films, with all but $4 million of the collective budgets already paid for.
       Although release had been rescheduled for Apr 1992, Married to It opened 26 Mar 1993, to mostly negative reviews.
       End credits state: “Excerpts from Mr. Ed by permission of Orion Television Entertainment, appearances by Alan Young, Larry Keating and Alan ‘Rocky’ Lane as the voice of Mr. Ed”; “New York Daily News name and logo used by permission of New York News, Inc.”; and, “The producer wishes to thank: The Ontario Film Development Corporation; The Toronto Film Liaison Office; The Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting – New York; Jaguar Cars Incorporated; Gallery Louise Smith, Toronto.” More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 Oct 1989.
---
Daily Variety
29 Aug 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 1991
p. 12, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Oct 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Mar 1993
Calendar, p. 8.
New York Times
24 Aug 1990.
---
New York Times
26 Mar 1993
Section C, p. 8.
Us
Sep 1991.
---
Variety
23 Sep 1991
p. 78.
Variety
18 Nov 1991
p. 3, 8.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring (alphabetically):
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Orion Pictures Release
A Thomas Baer Production
An Arthur Hiller Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Unit prod mgr, Toronto crew
2d asst dir, Toronto crew
3d asst dir, Toronto crew
3d asst dir, Toronto crew
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
Asst prod mgr, New York crew
1st asst dir, New York crew
DGA trainee, New York crew
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op, Toronto crew
1st asst cam, Toronto crew
2d asst cam, Toronto crew
Cam trainee, Toronto crew
Cam trainee, Toronto crew
Key grip, Toronto crew
2d key grip, Toronto crew
Dolly grip, Toronto crew
Grip, Toronto crew
Grip, Toronto crew
Gaffer, Toronto crew
Best boy, Toronto crew
Elec, Toronto crew
Elec, Toronto crew
Generator op, Toronto crew
Video supv, Toronto crew
Still photog, Toronto crew
Cam op, New York crew
1st asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Best boy, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Best boy, New York crew
Still photog, New York crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, Toronto crew
Asst art dir, Toronto crew
2d asst art dir, Toronto crew
Art dir trainee, Toronto crew
Art dir, New York crew
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Post prod supv
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec, Toronto crew
Asst set dec, Toronto crew
Set dec buyer, Toronto crew
Prop master, Toronto crew
Asst prop master, Toronto crew
Const coord, Toronto crew
Head carpenter, Toronto crew
Scenic artist, Toronto crew
Asst scenic artist, Toronto crew
Standby scenic artist
Prop master, New York crew
Asst prop man, New York crew
Lead set dresser, New York crew
Set dresser, New York crew
Set dresser, New York crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv, Toronto crew
Ward person, Toronto crew
Ward person, Toronto crew
Ward supv, New York crew
Ward asst, New York crew
MUSIC
Orig mus
Orig mus rec facility
Scoring mixer
Mus preparation
Mus seq staged by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer, Toronto crew
Boom op, Toronto crew
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Supv Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Sd eff rec
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec facility
Dolby Stereo consultant
Sd mixer, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup artist, Toronto crew
Asst makeup artist, Toronto crew
Hairstylist, Toronto crew
Asst hairstylist, Toronto crew
Hairstylist, New York crew
Makeup artist, New York crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Canadian casting
Tech adv
Scr supv, Toronto crew
Loc mgr, Toronto crew
Unit loc mgr, Toronto crew
Prod coord, Toronto crew
Prod auditor, Toronto crew
Asst accountant, Toronto crew
Financial representative, Toronto crew
Prod secy, Toronto crew
Unit pub, Toronto crew
Tutor coord, Toronto crew
Catering, Toronto crew
Catering, Michelson Food Services Canada, Toronto
Craft service, Toronto crew
Asst to Mr. Hiller, Toronto crew
Prod asst, Toronto crew
Prod asst, Toronto crew
Asst to Mr. Herald, Toronto crew
Transportation coord, Toronto crew
Transportation capt, Toronto crew
Head driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Driver, Toronto crew
Voice casting
Scr supv, New York crew
Loc supv, New York crew
Loc asst, New York crew
Extras casting, New York crew
Prod office coord, New York crew
Asst prod office coord, New York crew
Loc auditor, New York crew
Asst accountant, New York crew
Transportation coord, New York crew
Co-capt, New York crew
Co-capt, New York crew
Asst to Mr. Baer, New York crew
Key set prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
STAND INS
Stunt cab driver
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Circle Game," written by Joni Mitchell, courtesy of Siquomb Publishing Corporation
"Decadence Dance," written by Nuno Bettencourt and Gary Cherone, performed by Extreme, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Mr. Lucky," written by Henry Mancini, courtesy of Northridge Music Company, administered by All Nations Music
+
SONGS
"The Circle Game," written by Joni Mitchell, courtesy of Siquomb Publishing Corporation
"Decadence Dance," written by Nuno Bettencourt and Gary Cherone, performed by Extreme, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Mr. Lucky," written by Henry Mancini, courtesy of Northridge Music Company, administered by All Nations Music
"I Love You And Don't You Forget It," written by Henry Mancini, courtesy of Northridge Music Company, administered by All Nations Music
"Sonata No. 1 In C Major, K. 279," written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 March 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 10 September 1991
Toronto Festival of Festivals screening: 11 September 1991
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 March 1993
Production Date:
30 July--mid October 1990
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras and Lenses
Prints
Prints by Deluxe®
Duration(in mins):
112
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In early September, middle-aged New York City social worker John Morden and his wife, Iris, prepare their two sons for another year at an elite private school they cannot afford. At the welcome-back party, Iris introduces herself to Nina Bishop, the young school psychologist recently arrived from Iowa with her new husband, Chuck Bishop. Wealthy socialite Claire Laurent interrupts the conversation, startling them with bawdy comments about her sex life. Claire explains that she only attended the event as a favor to her husband, toy manufacturer Leo Rothenberg, whose bratty thirteen-year-old daughter, Lucy, attends the school. Despite Claire’s protests, Iris recruits her and Nina for the school pageant decorations committee. Although the Bishops’ apartment is not yet furnished, Nina offers to host the committee’s first dinner party meeting. After an awkward start, the couples discuss the pageant’s 1960s theme. John recalls his youth as a “flower child,” and bonds with Leo about the music and trends of the era. At his job as a Wall Street stockbroker, Chuck aspires to make a good impression on his boss, and gratefully accepts an investment tip from his suave associate, Jeremy Brimfield. One afternoon, Leo fights with his ex-wife, Madeleine, insisting he spoils Lucy with gifts because he was unable to give her a perfect family life after the divorce. Unwilling to put aside her differences with her stepmother, Lucy begins therapy sessions with Nina. Lucy comes to trust Nina, who encourages the girl to make more of an effort to connect with Claire. Leo and Claire host the next committee meeting, and Claire takes pleasure in showing off their lavish décor and serving classy hors d’oeuvres. The couples lose track of ... +


In early September, middle-aged New York City social worker John Morden and his wife, Iris, prepare their two sons for another year at an elite private school they cannot afford. At the welcome-back party, Iris introduces herself to Nina Bishop, the young school psychologist recently arrived from Iowa with her new husband, Chuck Bishop. Wealthy socialite Claire Laurent interrupts the conversation, startling them with bawdy comments about her sex life. Claire explains that she only attended the event as a favor to her husband, toy manufacturer Leo Rothenberg, whose bratty thirteen-year-old daughter, Lucy, attends the school. Despite Claire’s protests, Iris recruits her and Nina for the school pageant decorations committee. Although the Bishops’ apartment is not yet furnished, Nina offers to host the committee’s first dinner party meeting. After an awkward start, the couples discuss the pageant’s 1960s theme. John recalls his youth as a “flower child,” and bonds with Leo about the music and trends of the era. At his job as a Wall Street stockbroker, Chuck aspires to make a good impression on his boss, and gratefully accepts an investment tip from his suave associate, Jeremy Brimfield. One afternoon, Leo fights with his ex-wife, Madeleine, insisting he spoils Lucy with gifts because he was unable to give her a perfect family life after the divorce. Unwilling to put aside her differences with her stepmother, Lucy begins therapy sessions with Nina. Lucy comes to trust Nina, who encourages the girl to make more of an effort to connect with Claire. Leo and Claire host the next committee meeting, and Claire takes pleasure in showing off their lavish décor and serving classy hors d’oeuvres. The couples lose track of time, and Leo suggests they reconvene at the Mordens’ apartment the following week. A few days later, Chuck is arrested for “stock parking,” and the story gains widespread media attention. After he is released on bail, Chuck confronts Jeremy Brimfield, believing Jeremy’s advice led to his arrest. Although Chuck pleas his innocence, he struggles to find an attorney that will take the case to court. Iris refers him to her liberal lawyer friend, Sol Chamberlain, who agrees to represent Chuck despite their political differences. To cover the bills, Nina starts a private psychology practice in her apartment, which adds to Chuck’s stress. One night while Leo is detained at work, Claire sends a limousine to pick up Lucy from a friend’s house. Hoping to get her stepmother into trouble, Lucy gets drunk on whiskey in the limousine’s back-seat bar and instructs the chauffeur to drive her around town. She eventually winds up at the Bishops’ apartment, seeking Nina’s comfort. Nina returns Lucy to Leo, who is relieved to see her home safely and reprimands Claire for being careless. Claire blames Lucy for failing to establish a relationship, but Nina reminds her that Lucy is just a child caught in the middle of her parents’ mistakes. Once upstairs, Claire admits that she does not want to be a mother to Lucy. Leo is unwilling to compromise for his daughter, and the two agree to get a divorce. The news shocks the Mordens and the Bishops, who help Leo move into a new apartment. As the men re-paint the interior, the women spend the afternoon out, and Nina says that she considers Iris and Claire to be close friends. Over time, Nina becomes increasingly frustrated by Chuck’s reclusiveness, but Iris urges her not to give up on the relationship so quickly. Now alone, Leo struggles to connect with his daughter. Lucy blames herself for the dissolution of Leo’s marriage, but Leo insists Claire simply did not know how to be a parent. Nina returns home to find that Chuck has done the chores and prepared dinner. He apologizes for pushing her away, claiming that he wanted to protect her. They reconcile, and Nina helps Chuck and Sol prepare their defense. Meanwhile, Claire loans Iris a revealing dress for John’s black-tie work gala. John is stunned by his dowdy wife’s glamorous transformation, but Iris is hurt by the implication that he is more concerned with physical attraction and does not appreciate everything she does to keep their family together. Sol Chamberlain eventually uncovers evidence revealing that Jeremy Brimsfield used Chuck as a pawn in the stock parking scandal, and Chuck is cleared of all charges. On the night of the school pageant, Claire attends the opera with her new lover. While listening to another snooty socialite speak negatively about marriage, Claire has second thoughts about her decision to walk out on Leo and creates an excuse to leave the theater. Arriving at the school during the final musical number, Claire sits next to Leo in the audience and joins her friends in an enthusiastic round of applause. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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