Me and the Kid (1993)

PG | 97 mins | Comedy | 22 October 1993

Director:

Dan Curtis

Producers:

Lynn Loring, Dan Curtis

Cinematographer:

Dietrich Lohmann

Editor:

Bill Blunden

Production Designer:

Veronica Hadfield

Production Company:

Dan Curtis Productions
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HISTORY

End credits misspell the name of production assistant Ashley Johnson as “Ashely Johnson.” Although actress Lana Clarkson is included among opening cast credits, she does not appear in the final film.
       On 27 Jan 1977, HR announced that producer Jack Farren had optioned film rights to Stanley Cohen’s 1970 novel, Taking Gary Feldman, which a 1 Dec 1977 HR item later indicated had been adapted for the screen by Cohen himself. Three years later, however, a 29 Dec 1980 DV article stated that Alan Sharp had been hired to write the screenplay, with Joseph Stern attached as producer and Dan Curtis set to make his feature film directorial debut after completing work on the 1983 television miniseries, The Winds of War. Despite the 27 Jan 1977 report, DV claimed that Jack Farren had actually acquired the rights in the early 1970s for a CBS television film before the network’s motion picture branch, CBS+Theatrical+Films&sortType=sortByExactMatch'>CBS Theatrical Films, decided to rework the script as a theatrical feature.
       Although filming was expected to begin in early 1981, production did not move ahead, and only Curtis remained with the project. A 27 Oct 1992 DV article stated that the filmmaker personally covered the $4 million budget to launch the picture under his new production banner, Dan Curtis Productions. According to a 26 Sep 1993 LAT article, Curtis opted to make the film himself after growing “frustrated” with some studios’ conditions that required him to revise the script. Once Danny Aiello signed on to play “Harry Banner,” Curtis moved ahead with production. Although a 2 Sep 1992 ... More Less

End credits misspell the name of production assistant Ashley Johnson as “Ashely Johnson.” Although actress Lana Clarkson is included among opening cast credits, she does not appear in the final film.
       On 27 Jan 1977, HR announced that producer Jack Farren had optioned film rights to Stanley Cohen’s 1970 novel, Taking Gary Feldman, which a 1 Dec 1977 HR item later indicated had been adapted for the screen by Cohen himself. Three years later, however, a 29 Dec 1980 DV article stated that Alan Sharp had been hired to write the screenplay, with Joseph Stern attached as producer and Dan Curtis set to make his feature film directorial debut after completing work on the 1983 television miniseries, The Winds of War. Despite the 27 Jan 1977 report, DV claimed that Jack Farren had actually acquired the rights in the early 1970s for a CBS television film before the network’s motion picture branch, CBS+Theatrical+Films&sortType=sortByExactMatch'>CBS Theatrical Films, decided to rework the script as a theatrical feature.
       Although filming was expected to begin in early 1981, production did not move ahead, and only Curtis remained with the project. A 27 Oct 1992 DV article stated that the filmmaker personally covered the $4 million budget to launch the picture under his new production banner, Dan Curtis Productions. According to a 26 Sep 1993 LAT article, Curtis opted to make the film himself after growing “frustrated” with some studios’ conditions that required him to revise the script. Once Danny Aiello signed on to play “Harry Banner,” Curtis moved ahead with production. Although a 2 Sep 1992 HR item suggested that Curtis served as a co-writer, Richard Tannenbaum receives sole onscreen writing credit.
       The 4 Dec 1992 Var stated that principal photography began on 12 Oct 1992, with locations in New York City and Los Angeles, CA. Several actors accepted cuts to their usual salaries, and the crew worked long hours to complete the film within a month.
       Despite Orion Pictures’ struggle to rebuild after its bankruptcy in late 1991, the 23 Jul 1993 LAT stated that the company had acquired domestic distribution rights to the film, with costs covered by Orion’s majority shareholder, Metromedia. Around this time, the title was changed to Me and the Kid.
       Reviews were overwhelmingly negative, and the 25 Oct 1993 DV stated that the film took in a mere $43,000 on eighty-nine screens during its first weekend in regional release.
       Although he receives an "Introducing" credit for Me and the Kid, Alex Zuckerman appeared in the earlier released films The Adventures of Huck Finn (1993), Freaked (1993), and Hook (1991, see entries). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Dec 1980
p. 1, 6.
Daily Variety
27 Oct 1992.
---
Daily Variety
25 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jan 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Oct 1993
p. 6, 52.
Los Angeles Times
23 Jul 1993
Section D, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
26 Sep 1993
Calendar, p. 29.
Los Angeles Times
23 Oct 1993
Calendar, p. 2.
Variety
4 Dec 1992.
---
Variety
1 Nov 1993
p. 37.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Orion Pictures Release
A Dan Curtis Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Line prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Writer's assoc
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Film loader
Best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Grip
Grip
Still photog
Video playback
Playback op
Cam op, New York crew
1st asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Film loader, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Best girl/Grip, New York crew
Steadicam, New York crew
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutting by
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Lead set dresser
Set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Const coord
Paint foreman
Set painter
Set painter
Set painter
Scenic painter
Painter
Set des
Set des
Gen foreman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Set costumer
Des asst
Ward shopper
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
Mus preparation
Mus scoring mixer
Mus ed
Orch contractor
Orch
Addl orch
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Sd cableman
Dir of digital sd
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst ed
Foley crew
Foley crew
Foley crew
Foley crew
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Prod mixer, New York crew
Boom, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Key spec eff
Spec eff
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Key makeup
Key hair
Asst hair/Makeup
Extra hair/Makeup
Extra hair/Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Aerial coord
Pilot
Pilot
Pilot
Exec asst to Mr. Curtis
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Scr supv
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Exec asst to Ms. Loring
Asst loc mgr
Unit pub
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Extras casting
Casting asst
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
Dog trainer
Caterer
Craft service
Asst craft service
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Loc mgr, New York crew
Office coord, New York crew
Best girl/Grip, New York crew
Casting, New York crew
Asst casting, New York crew
Helicopter, New York crew
Driver, New York crew
Driver, New York crew
Driver, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Post prod facilities
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt driver
Stunt driver
Stunt driver
COLOR PERSONNEL
Dailies by
Lab contact
Col timing
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Taking Gary Feldman by Stanley Cohen (New York, 1970).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Goin' To Mexico," music and lyrics by Bob Cobert, performed by Rick Logan, Arnold McCuller, Gene Miller.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Taking Gary Feldman
Release Date:
22 October 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 22 October 1993
Production Date:
12 October--November 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Dan Curtis Productions
Copyright Date:
17 November 1993
Copyright Number:
PA667973
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32304
SYNOPSIS

Disguised as laundrymen, former convicts Roy Walls and Harry Banner drive to White Plains, New York, intending to rob the home of the wealthy Feldman family, whom they believe to be out of town. After a confrontation with the maids, Harry cracks the living room safe, which he discovers does not contain any money. When the Feldman’s eight-year-old son, Gary, walks in on them, the impetuous Roy seizes the child and throws him in the back of their van. Harry objects to the kidnapping, but accompanies Roy to his hunting cabin hideout in rural New Jersey. Once there, Gary suffers an anxiety-induced asthma attack, and Harry sympathetically helps him use his nebulizer. Later, Roy gets in touch with the Feldmans’ lawyer, Fred Herbert, and demands that Gary’s father, Victor, return to the house immediately without contacting police. While Roy drinks heavily and threatens the hurt the boy, Harry shows him kindness. Gary admits he is not all that upset about being kidnapped, since the experience has freed him from a sheltered life with his self-absorbed parents. Meanwhile, Mrs. Feldman disobeys Roy’s instructions and informs FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) agents Pasetta and Schamper of her son’s disappearance. The next morning, Roy demands a $500,000 ransom while Pasetta and Schamper listen in on his phone call. Victor negotiates with Roy, claiming he can only pay $90,000, which Roy accepts. Roy allows Gary to speak with his parents, but the boy accidentally refers to Harry by his surname, which allows the FBI agents to pull up the convicts’ criminal records. Once Roy leaves to pick up the money from Victor, Harry packs a bag and tells Gary they are running away ... +


Disguised as laundrymen, former convicts Roy Walls and Harry Banner drive to White Plains, New York, intending to rob the home of the wealthy Feldman family, whom they believe to be out of town. After a confrontation with the maids, Harry cracks the living room safe, which he discovers does not contain any money. When the Feldman’s eight-year-old son, Gary, walks in on them, the impetuous Roy seizes the child and throws him in the back of their van. Harry objects to the kidnapping, but accompanies Roy to his hunting cabin hideout in rural New Jersey. Once there, Gary suffers an anxiety-induced asthma attack, and Harry sympathetically helps him use his nebulizer. Later, Roy gets in touch with the Feldmans’ lawyer, Fred Herbert, and demands that Gary’s father, Victor, return to the house immediately without contacting police. While Roy drinks heavily and threatens the hurt the boy, Harry shows him kindness. Gary admits he is not all that upset about being kidnapped, since the experience has freed him from a sheltered life with his self-absorbed parents. Meanwhile, Mrs. Feldman disobeys Roy’s instructions and informs FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) agents Pasetta and Schamper of her son’s disappearance. The next morning, Roy demands a $500,000 ransom while Pasetta and Schamper listen in on his phone call. Victor negotiates with Roy, claiming he can only pay $90,000, which Roy accepts. Roy allows Gary to speak with his parents, but the boy accidentally refers to Harry by his surname, which allows the FBI agents to pull up the convicts’ criminal records. Once Roy leaves to pick up the money from Victor, Harry packs a bag and tells Gary they are running away to Mexico. Outside the bus station, Harry reveals his intention to abandon the boy, but Gary refuses to part ways and insists they continue their journey together. After stealing a car and a gun, Harry realizes they do not have enough money, so Gary convinces him to return to the cabin and claim his share of the ransom from Roy. Harry holds Roy at gunpoint, but becomes distracted when Gary barges into the room, fearing for Harry’s safety. The gun misfires, and Gary runs back to the car, losing his glasses in the process. Harry binds Roy with rope and absconds with the entire ransom, which he and Gary use to buy clothes and supplies. Outside the store, they see a man giving away puppies, and, ignoring his severe allergies, Gary decides to adopt one. That night, Harry and Gary cook hot dogs by a campfire and commiserate about their poor relationships with their fathers. Harry discusses his past occupation as a talented mechanic before he turned to a life of crime. The next morning, Harry disguises the boy by dyeing his distinctive red hair, and the two realize a bond has formed between them. When the car breaks down, they get a lift from a motel and amusement park owner named Rose Farrell, who offers to let them stay for free if Harry can fix the motor on her Ferris wheel. Although Rose finds Harry attractive, she becomes suspicious when the supposed “uncle and nephew” behave nervously around her police officer friend, J. P. At dinner, Gary notices the flirtation between the two adults and sulks when Harry sends him away so he and Rose can spend the evening together. The next morning, J. P. stops by the motel after discovering that Harry’s abandoned vehicle was reported stolen. Covering for them, Rose tells J. P. that the fugitives have already left and pleads ignorance of their whereabouts. Once J. P. leaves, she suggests Harry get in touch with her ex-brother-in-law, a pilot who can fly him to Canada. Harry declines, but agrees to borrow her car. After a dangerous run-in with police, however, Harry calls Rose back, now keen to accept her earlier offer. That night, Harry leaves Gary in the car while he returns to Rose’s motel. Inside, he discovers that Roy has caught up to them and tied Rose to a chair. As Roy leads Harry outside to shoot him, Gary turns on the car and drives into Roy, breaking his knee. Harry and Gary rejoice, but return to the motel office to find that Rose has already called police under the mistaken impression that Harry was killed. As his getaway plane approaches, Harry tells Gary that he must continue his escape alone, and presents the boy with a personalized woodcarving of an owl. Hurt by his abandonment, Gary throws the figurine away and bursts into tears. Suddenly, an FBI helicopter swoops overhead, and Harry takes cover in the motel. With police swarming the property, Gary conquers his fear of heights by climbing to the top of the Ferris wheel and threatening to jump unless Harry is allowed to go free. Roy is arrested, but Harry emerges from the motel with the briefcase of money, gets into the stolen car, and drives away. Although Pasetta and Schamper attempt to follow him, Harry evades his pursuers and successfully disappears. Six months later, Harry drives up to Gary’s house dressed in an expensive suit and announces he has arrived to take him to Mexico, as promised. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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