Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993)

PG | 107 mins | Comedy | 1993

Director:

Bill Duke

Producers:

Dawn Steel, Scott Rudin

Cinematographer:

Oliver Wood

Production Designer:

John DeCuir Jr.

Production Company:

Touchstone Pictures
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HISTORY

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Taylor Miller, a student at University of Texas at Austin, with Janet Staiger as academic advisor.

The end credits contain a written statement from the producers, thanking Iris Stevenson "for her inspiration." Stevenson was a dynamic Los Angeles public school teacher who motivated marginal students to academic success through her music program at Crenshaw High School. According to a 5 Dec 1993 LAT article, producer Dawn Steel became interested in making a film about Stevenson after reading a 4 May 1991 LAT article about teacher layoffs for which the teacher was interviewed. The 5 Dec 1993 LAT article reported that a script by Judi Ann Mason titled Knocking on Heaven's Door was submitted to Disney. The studio was interested in the project, but decided to modify it to serve as a sequel to the 1992 film, Sister Act . An 8 Sep 1992 DV news item reported that Touchstone Pictures and Disney president , David Hoberman, had been in discussions about a sequel with Scott Rudin, the executive producer of Sister Act , and that the studio wanted to accommodate both Rudin's and Steel's ideas. Rudin submitted a ten-page treatment using his own ideas and Mason's script that Steel had been developing. The 5 Dec 1993 LAT article stated that the final script was a rewrite by Jim Orr and Jim Cruikshank. The article also reported that Rudin, who was credited onscreen as producer, worked mostly on pre- and post-production ... More Less

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Taylor Miller, a student at University of Texas at Austin, with Janet Staiger as academic advisor.

The end credits contain a written statement from the producers, thanking Iris Stevenson "for her inspiration." Stevenson was a dynamic Los Angeles public school teacher who motivated marginal students to academic success through her music program at Crenshaw High School. According to a 5 Dec 1993 LAT article, producer Dawn Steel became interested in making a film about Stevenson after reading a 4 May 1991 LAT article about teacher layoffs for which the teacher was interviewed. The 5 Dec 1993 LAT article reported that a script by Judi Ann Mason titled Knocking on Heaven's Door was submitted to Disney. The studio was interested in the project, but decided to modify it to serve as a sequel to the 1992 film, Sister Act . An 8 Sep 1992 DV news item reported that Touchstone Pictures and Disney president , David Hoberman, had been in discussions about a sequel with Scott Rudin, the executive producer of Sister Act , and that the studio wanted to accommodate both Rudin's and Steel's ideas. Rudin submitted a ten-page treatment using his own ideas and Mason's script that Steel had been developing. The 5 Dec 1993 LAT article stated that the final script was a rewrite by Jim Orr and Jim Cruikshank. The article also reported that Rudin, who was credited onscreen as producer, worked mostly on pre- and post-production of Sister Act 2 . Mario Iscovich, who had been co-producer on the original film, and Laurence Mark, who was brought in at "the 11th hour" according to the same LAT article, served as executive producers to the sequel.
       According to the film's production notes, over 3,000 young people, ages fourteen to twenty-five, auditioned during a nine-city, nation-wide search to fill the roles of the twenty-three "St Katherine's students" in the picture. A 16 Apr 1993 LADN news item reported that director Bill Duke asked the studio to pay for an acting coach for Tanya Blount, the twenty-year-old singer from Washington, D.C and eventually cast her in the role of "Tanya."
       19 Aug 1993 and 10 Feb 1994 LAT and 27 Aug 1993 HR news items reported that Ron Johnson, the twenty-one-year-old actor who portrayed "Sketch" in the film, was arrested for allegedly raping a sixteen-year-old unpaid extra on the set and a nineteen-year-old woman he met at a promotional party for the film. Johnson admitted he had sex with the extra, but that it was consensual, and although he had attended the party, he testified that he did not meet the second claimant. He pleaded innocent and was later acquitted of both charges. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 1993.
---
Los Angeles Daily News
16 Apr 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
4 May 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 Aug 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
5 Dec 1993
pp. 32-33, 36.
Los Angeles Times
10 Dec 1993
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
10 Feb 1994.
---
New York Times
10 Dec 1993
p. 10.
Variety
8 Sep 1992.
---
Variety
20 Dec 1993
pp. 32-33.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Classroom kids:
Choir nuns:
Dancers:
The Iris Choir:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Scott Rudin/Dawn Steel production; A Bill Duke film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
End seq staged and dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
Cam op
B/A cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst B cam
2d asst cam
2d asst B cam
Cam loader
Video playback
Lighting des/Consultant
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
2d grip
Key rigging grip
Dolly grip
Chapman cranes and dollies provided by
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Addl film ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Set des
Illustrator
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Standby painter
Leadman
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Key set cost
Key set cost
Cost for Ms. Goldberg
MUSIC
Score by
Addl score material by
Orchestrations by
Mus supv
Prod mus supv
Asst mus supv
Supv mus ed
Mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Soundtrack consultant
Mus playback op
Competition mus consultant
Mus contractor
Supv copyist
Choir nun vocal coach and contractor
SOUND
Sd mixer
Cable person
Supv sd eff ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR supv
ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
ADR voice casting
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Mus rec and mixed by
Audio programmer
Addl rec
Addl rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Main titles des
End credits des and supv
DANCE
Choreog
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Key hairstylist
Key makeup supv
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Extras casting - Los Angeles
Extras casting - San Francisco
Event extras casting
Scr supv
Loc assoc
Prod coord
Prod supv
Asst to Mr. Iscovich
Asst to Mr. Mark
Asst to Mr. Mark
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Duke
Asst to Mr. Duke
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Post prod coord
Post prod coord
DGA trainee
Unit pub
Studio teacher
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Craft service
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stand-in for Ms. Goldberg
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Joseph Howard.
AUTHOR
SONGS
"A Deeper Love," performed by Aretha Franklin, written by David Cole and Robert Clivilles, produced by C&C Music Factory, Aretha Franklin appears courtesy of Arista Records
"The Mother Of All Medleys," performed by Whoopi Goldberg, arranged and produced by Marc Shaiman
"Love Child," written by R. Dean Taylor, Pamela Sawyer, Frank E. Wilson and Deke Richards,
+
SONGS
"A Deeper Love," performed by Aretha Franklin, written by David Cole and Robert Clivilles, produced by C&C Music Factory, Aretha Franklin appears courtesy of Arista Records
"The Mother Of All Medleys," performed by Whoopi Goldberg, arranged and produced by Marc Shaiman
"Love Child," written by R. Dean Taylor, Pamela Sawyer, Frank E. Wilson and Deke Richards,
"Please Mr. Postman," written by William Garrett, Georgia Dobbins, Brian Holland, Freddie Gorman and Robert Bateman
"I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch)," written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Edward Holland, Jr.
"Stop In The Name Of Love," written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Edward Holland, Jr.
"Bad Girls," written by Donna Summer, Bruce Sudano, Edward Hokenson and Joe "Beans" Esposito
"Nowhere To Run," written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Edward Holland, Jr.
"I Will Follow Him," written by Norman Gimbel, Arthur Altman, Jacques Plante, Franck Pourcel and Paul Mauriat
"Can't Turn You Loose," written by Otis Redding
"Le Freak," written by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers
"Shop Around," written by William "Smokey" Robinson and Berry Gordy
"Devil With The Blue Dress," written by William Stevenson and Frederick Long
"Proud Mary," written by John Fogerty
"Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini," written by Paul Vance and Lee Pockress
"Mr. Big Stuff," written by Joseph Broussard, Ralph Williams and Carrol Washington
"The Hustle," written by Van McCoy
"We Are Family," written by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers
"My Guy," written by William "Smokey" Robinson
"Shotgun," written by Autry DeWalt
"For The Love Of Money," written by Kenneth Gamble, Leon Huff and Anthony Jackson
"Who's Got The Flo," performed by Ron Johnson, Lauryn Hill and The Classroom Kids, written by Ron Johnson, Lauryn Hill and Devin Kamin
"Wake Up And Pay Attention," performed by Valeria Andrews and Ryan Toby, written by Whoopi Goldberg, Kevin Cloud, Roni Skies and Valeria Andrews, produced by Cloud 'n Skies
"Love Boat (Main Title)," written by Paul Williams and Charles Fox
"Never Should Have Let You Go," performed by Hi-Five, written by Eric Foster White, courtesy of Jive Records
"His Eye Is On The Sparrow," performed by Tanya Blount and Lauryn Hill, written by C. D. Martin and Charles Gabriel, arranged and produced by Mervyn Warren
"Get Up Offa That Thing," performed by Whoopi Goldberg and The Nuns, written by Deanna Brown, Deidra Brown and Yamma Brown, arranged and produced by Marc Shaiman
"In The Still Of The Night," performed by The Rock Theatre Group, written by Fred Parris, arranged by Sidney James
"Lord Send A Revival," written by Roy Crayton, Jr., produced by D. A. Carlin
"Joyful, Joyful," performed by Ryan Toby, Lauryn Hill, with Devin Kamin, Ron Johnson, The St. Francis Choir, additional rap lyrics by Ryan Toby, arranged and produced by Mervyn Warren
"What Have You Done For Me Lately," written by James Harris III and Terry Lewis
"It's Me Again God," performed, written and produced by Devin Kamin
"Wandering Eyes," performed by Nuttin' Nyce, written by Darrol "Shamello" Durant, B-Wyze, and Kerwin "Sleek" Young, courtesy of Jive Records
"Oh Happy Day," performed by Ryan Toby with The St. Francis Choir, written by Edwin R. Hawkins, arranged and produced by Mervyn Warren
"Ball of Confusion (That's What The World Is Today)," performed by Whoopi Goldberg and The Nuns, written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, arranged and produced by Marc Shaiman
"Dancing In The Street," performed by Whoopi Goldberg and The Nuns, written by Ivy Joe Hunter, William Stevenson and Marvin Gaye, arranged and produced by Marc Shaiman
"Barbara Allen (Traditional)," performed by The Rock Theatre Group, arranged and produced by Sidney James
"Ode To Joy," from Beethoven's Symphony No. 9, Op. 125, performed by The Chapman College Choir, under the direction of William Hall, produced by D. A. Carlin
"O. P. P., "written by Alphonso Mizell, Freddie Perren, Deke Richards, Berry Gordy, Anthony Criss, Keir Gist and Vincent Brown
"Ain't No Mountain High Enough," performed by The Cast, written by Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson, arranged and produced by Marc Shaiman and Mervyn Warren.
+
COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Knocking on Heaven's Door
Sister Act II
Release Date:
1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 December 1993
New York opening: week of 10 December 1993
Production Date:
began 24 May 1993
Copyright Claimant:
Touchstone Pictures, an accepted alternative of the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
28 December 1993
Copyright Number:
PA670408
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo Digital in selected theaters
Color
Lenses/Prints
prints by Technicolor; lenses and Panaflex camera by Panavision
Duration(in mins):
107
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32795
SYNOPSIS

In Las Vegas, successful lounge singer Deloris Van Cartier gives the final performance of her hit musical, Sister Act , which features a medley of songs chronicling Deloris's real-life experience in the witness protection program. The songs relate how she hid from a Reno mobster by impersonating a nun at St. Katherine's convent in inner-city San Francisco. In the audience are nuns who befriended Deloris during her stay at St. Katherine's: Sisters Mary Lazarus, Mary Patrick and Mary Robert. After the show, the Sisters tell Deloris that she inspired them to be active in the community and they are now teaching at St. Francis, a struggling local school. They say that they were sent on a mission by Reverend Mother to bring Deloris back and ordered not to return without her. When Deloris arrives at St. Katherine's, Reverend Mother implores her to help the failing school by becoming a teacher and using music to revive St. Francis as she revived St. Katherine's. When Deloris hesitates, Reverend Mother reminds her that her recent fame and success came with the help of the convent, so out of obligation, Deloris agrees to join the faculty. Because school rules require that she be either a nun or a teacher, Deloris dons a habit and resumes her undercover persona as "Sister Mary Clarence." Only the Sisters know Deloris's true identity, and they do not reveal it to Father Maurice, the school principal, who is told that Deloris previously worked at a Louisiana prison. At dinner, Deloris meets Father Ignatius and Father Thomas, the math and Latin teachers, and Father Wolfgang, the cook who ... +


In Las Vegas, successful lounge singer Deloris Van Cartier gives the final performance of her hit musical, Sister Act , which features a medley of songs chronicling Deloris's real-life experience in the witness protection program. The songs relate how she hid from a Reno mobster by impersonating a nun at St. Katherine's convent in inner-city San Francisco. In the audience are nuns who befriended Deloris during her stay at St. Katherine's: Sisters Mary Lazarus, Mary Patrick and Mary Robert. After the show, the Sisters tell Deloris that she inspired them to be active in the community and they are now teaching at St. Francis, a struggling local school. They say that they were sent on a mission by Reverend Mother to bring Deloris back and ordered not to return without her. When Deloris arrives at St. Katherine's, Reverend Mother implores her to help the failing school by becoming a teacher and using music to revive St. Francis as she revived St. Katherine's. When Deloris hesitates, Reverend Mother reminds her that her recent fame and success came with the help of the convent, so out of obligation, Deloris agrees to join the faculty. Because school rules require that she be either a nun or a teacher, Deloris dons a habit and resumes her undercover persona as "Sister Mary Clarence." Only the Sisters know Deloris's true identity, and they do not reveal it to Father Maurice, the school principal, who is told that Deloris previously worked at a Louisiana prison. At dinner, Deloris meets Father Ignatius and Father Thomas, the math and Latin teachers, and Father Wolfgang, the cook who prepares variations of German sausages for their meals. When Deloris enters the music class, the students have corralled the desks and are rapping loudly, ignoring the presence of Mary Lazarus. To bring them to order, Deloris scratches her fingernails on the chalkboard, introduces herself, and meets the class. Student Tyler Chase is eager to please, but Richard Pencham, nicknamed "Sketch" for his artistic abilities, sleeps in the front row because he works late at a grocery store. Wesley Glen James informs Deloris that he wants to be called Ahmal M'jomo Jamaael, in honor of his African heritage. Frankie, pronounced "Fran-kay," introduces himself with an impromptu rap, while Rita Watson demonstrates bad attitude by explaining that the class is a "bird course" in which the students "fly right through" and pass by simply showing up. Later, Deloris meets with Father Maurice and Mr. Crisp, the dour school administrator, to request money to buy music and instruments, but she is told that the school cannot afford it. During a break in the schoolyard, Deloris sees the students perform an improvised rap, and although she is secretly impressed, she sends them back to class. That evening, several of the students decide they want to put the "nun on the run" by gluing Deloris to a chair. The next day, Deloris senses trouble when she walks into class, but commences her lesson and falls prey to their prank. Afterward, the Sisters are sympathetic and free her from the obligation to continue teaching. However, when Deloris overhears Father Maurice, Crisp, and three people from the Archdiocese discuss closing the school at the end of the semester, she decides to stay. By eavesdropping, she learns that their decision is based on Crisp's analysis that the school has neither community funding nor academic achievements and that Crisp is seeking early retirement after the school closes. When Deloris informs Reverend Mother and the other Sisters about the closing, they regret that the students will be bussed out of the neighborhood, which makes Deloris more committed to rescuing the school. Returning to the music class, Deloris demands order and respect, and informs the class they must earn passing grades. When Rita acts out, Delores throws her out of the class. Deloris's energy inspires the other faculty members to update their curriculum and to agree that if they're going to close down they will "go out with a little class." Back in the music room, Deloris learns that the students sing well and decides to turn the class into a choir. She takes them on an unauthorized field trip to see a performance. Frankie and Ahmal overhear Father Maurice talk about the school's upcoming closure and tell the other students, who agree that their participation in the choir might provide the school with a chance to survive. Deloris moves the class to the building's music room, which has long been unused. After having the students sing individually and together, she concludes that their talents are impressive, but they must learn to perform as a group. One night, Mary Robert overhears Rita singing with another student in the chapel and realizes how talented she is, but she does not know that Rita's mother discourages her from pursuing music. When Mary Robert tells Deloris that Rita wants to sing and needs her help, Deloris gives Rita a book by Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet , explaining that Rilke once told a young person that if he wakes up in the morning and can think of nothing but writing, he is a writer. Deloris tells Rita that if she thinks of nothing but singing, she is a singer, and, inspired, Rita rejoins the choir. To gain confidence, the choir sings for the school and, despite their timid start, they surprise their teachers and peers with the quality and energy of their performance. While cleaning, the Sisters discover several old music trophies won by the school's previous choir. Hoping that musical success will give the Archdiocese a reason to keep the school open, the Sisters enter the choir in a state contest to be held in Hollywood in six weeks. Before they can go, however, they need two thousand dollars for the cost of the trip and permission slips signed by the parents of each student. To raise the money, the Sisters involve the community by hosting an outdoor concert and passing around a donation basket. Meanwhile, the students rehearse diligently. When Rita's mother Florence discovers her practicing, she forbids her from entering the competition and forces her to quit the choir, reminding Rita that her father, a talented singer, died trying to make a living with his art. Florence insists that Rita study coursework that will lead to financial stability instead of distracting herself with the choir. However, at the last minute, Rita forges Florence's signature and joins the choir as their school bus sets off for Los Angeles. Afterward, Florence finds a note left by Rita that apologizes and explains that she had to follow her heart and sing with the group. Meanwhile, Crisp discovers an issue of Rolling Stone magazine that features Deloris, and tells Father Maurice that Mary Clarence is really a lounge singer. To avoid bad publicity, Crisp prefers to stop the choir from performing in person, rather than withdrawing the choir from the competition with a phone call. He sets off for Hollywood, accompanied by Fathers Maurice, Thomas, Ignatius and Wolfgang. In Hollywood, while waiting to perform, the nervous students are intimidated by other choirs, particularly the Chapman Choir, whose perfect unity in singing and attire prompts Mike to describe them as being "like an army." When they also discover that the Chapman Choir is singing the song they plan to perform, St. Francis students are ready to quit the competition. However, Deloris reinvigorates them, saying that if they run from every scary thing in life, all they'll do is run. When Crisp and the Fathers arrive, they separate to find Deloris. Father Maurice happens upon the choir backstage and is so inspired by their positivity, he permits them to go on. Crisp overhears this and is furious. He threatens to tell members of the Archdiocese in the audience that Deloris is a fake, but Fathers Ignatius and Thomas lock him in a closet, securing the door with one of Father Wolfgang's large sausages. Father Maurice takes a seat with Reverend Mother while Rita takes her place onstage for her opening solo and sees her mother in the audience. Deloris tells the choir members to take off their robes and, as their colorful street clothes are revealed, so too is their collective singing power, which showcases their individual talents in a way the Chapman Choir cannot compete. St. Francis wins the competition and the Archdiocese decides to keep the school open. Rita's mother comes backstage and expresses pride in her daughter. A disheveled Crisp escapes, but before he can reveal Deloris's true identity, Reverend Mother credits him for the school's success at the competition and urges the Archdiocese not to accept his early retirement. She says other trouble spots could benefit from his talents. The students overhear Mary Patrick wonder aloud how Deloris can perform night after night in Vegas and ask Deloris if the rumor that she is a Las Vegas showgirl is true. Insulted by the very idea, Deloris says she is not, nor has she ever been a Las Vegas showgirl. She ... is a headliner. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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