Doctors' Wives (1931)

79 or 82 mins | Drama | 15 March 1931

Director:

Frank Borzage

Cinematographer:

Arthur Edeson

Editor:

Jack Dennis

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Some contemporary sources refer to this film as Doctor's Wives . According to the file for the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Hays Office informed Fox, in Feb 1931, that it objected to the fact the "Nina's implied adultery with Doctor Ruyter...results in no serious consequences." The Hays Office suggested that Fox remedy the situation, which constituted a violation of the Production Code, by adding "some line at the end by which Nina could tell her husband that although she was out of her head on the night in question and might have done anything, nevertheless, Doctor Ruyter had saved her from herself." In Nov 1936, when Fox applied for re-issue certification of the picture, the PCA initially responded by urging the studio to withdraw its application for the permit because the picture contained "the situation of a wife deliberately giving herself to another man out of pique against her husband, and of the husband condoning this adultery." However, in Dec 1936, the PCA approved certification for the film once it was assured that eliminations agreed to by Fox would be made. An Apr 1936 HR news item states that Twentieth Century-Fox planned to produce a remake of the film entitled The Doctor's Wife . Raymond Griffith was set to supervise the production and Kathryn Scola was set to write the story, but the film was never ... More Less

Some contemporary sources refer to this film as Doctor's Wives . According to the file for the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the Hays Office informed Fox, in Feb 1931, that it objected to the fact the "Nina's implied adultery with Doctor Ruyter...results in no serious consequences." The Hays Office suggested that Fox remedy the situation, which constituted a violation of the Production Code, by adding "some line at the end by which Nina could tell her husband that although she was out of her head on the night in question and might have done anything, nevertheless, Doctor Ruyter had saved her from herself." In Nov 1936, when Fox applied for re-issue certification of the picture, the PCA initially responded by urging the studio to withdraw its application for the permit because the picture contained "the situation of a wife deliberately giving herself to another man out of pique against her husband, and of the husband condoning this adultery." However, in Dec 1936, the PCA approved certification for the film once it was assured that eliminations agreed to by Fox would be made. An Apr 1936 HR news item states that Twentieth Century-Fox planned to produce a remake of the film entitled The Doctor's Wife . Raymond Griffith was set to supervise the production and Kathryn Scola was set to write the story, but the film was never made. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
EHW
27 Dec 30
p. 28.
Film Daily
11 Jan 31
p. 4.
Film Daily
26 Apr 31
p. 10.
HF
17 Jan 31
p. 24.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 36
p. 1.
Motion Picture Herald
4 Apr 31
p. 37.
New York Times
25 Apr 31
p. 23.
Variety
29 Apr 31
p. 37.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Frank Borzage Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Scr and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
[Set] executed by
COSTUMES
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Doctors' Wives by Henry and Sylvia Lieferant (New York, 3 May 1930).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Doctor's Wives
Release Date:
15 March 1931
Production Date:
17 December 1930--23 January 1931
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
28 February 1931
Copyright Number:
LP2044
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79 or 82
Length(in feet):
7,354
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

While seeking medical help for her dying father, Dr. Mark Wyndram, Nina finds Dr. Judson Penning in a taxi and rushes him to her home. Judson, however, is unable to save Nina's father. When Nina tells Judson that she wants to be a doctor, he offers her a job as a laboratory assistant at his clinic. After Judson overhears Nina complaining about the lack of interest he is taking in her, he invites her to dinner and she accepts. Though Nina's mother, Julia, warns her about the dangers of becoming involved with physicians and tells her that she will be neglected because doctors are always on call, Nina disregards her advice and marries Judson. Soon after the wedding, Julia's predictions prove true and the doctor is called away at an inopportune moment. One evening, Nina and Judson visit Judson's friend, Dr. Kane Ruyter. When Kane shows Nina his collection of musical instruments and shares his philosophy of life with her, she is genuinely impressed. Kane tells Nina that he believes that a man must choose between women and work and never attempt to attend to both. Nina continues to take interest in Kane, who she realizes is a true romantic in search of sincere love. Frustrated by her husband's inattentiveness, Nina tries to discuss the problem with him, but before they can resolve anything the doctor is called away to another emergency. Suspicious about his ill-timed and frequent emergency calls, Nina follows her husband on a call and finds his patient, a woman, making a violent play for him. Having had her suspicions confirmed, Nina leaves a note on Judson's ... +


While seeking medical help for her dying father, Dr. Mark Wyndram, Nina finds Dr. Judson Penning in a taxi and rushes him to her home. Judson, however, is unable to save Nina's father. When Nina tells Judson that she wants to be a doctor, he offers her a job as a laboratory assistant at his clinic. After Judson overhears Nina complaining about the lack of interest he is taking in her, he invites her to dinner and she accepts. Though Nina's mother, Julia, warns her about the dangers of becoming involved with physicians and tells her that she will be neglected because doctors are always on call, Nina disregards her advice and marries Judson. Soon after the wedding, Julia's predictions prove true and the doctor is called away at an inopportune moment. One evening, Nina and Judson visit Judson's friend, Dr. Kane Ruyter. When Kane shows Nina his collection of musical instruments and shares his philosophy of life with her, she is genuinely impressed. Kane tells Nina that he believes that a man must choose between women and work and never attempt to attend to both. Nina continues to take interest in Kane, who she realizes is a true romantic in search of sincere love. Frustrated by her husband's inattentiveness, Nina tries to discuss the problem with him, but before they can resolve anything the doctor is called away to another emergency. Suspicious about his ill-timed and frequent emergency calls, Nina follows her husband on a call and finds his patient, a woman, making a violent play for him. Having had her suspicions confirmed, Nina leaves a note on Judson's car informing him that she has left him. Though he has no evidence to prove that his wife has been unfaithful, Judson assumes that she has left him for Kane. Later, when Kane becomes ill and is rushed to the hospital in need of emergency surgery, Judson, the only man capable of operating on him, is assigned to the surgery. A delicate and complicated operation ensues with Nina officiating as Judson's nurse. In a private moment with Nina, Kane tells her that her husband truly loves her and that he is indeed worthy of her love. The operation is a success and Nina returns to Judson, proud to be a doctor's wife. When the doctor gets another emergency call, he declines to respond to it until Nina takes the phone and tells the patient that her husband will be there immediately. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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