Business and Pleasure (1932)

70 or 76 mins | Comedy-drama | 6 March 1932

Directors:

David Butler, Sam Taylor

Cinematographer:

Ernest Palmer

Editor:

Irene Morra

Production Designer:

Joseph C. Wright

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Booth Tarkington's novel was serialized in Ladies' Home Journal (Sep 1926--Jan 1927). A working title for this film was The Plutocrat , and it was reviewed as such in HR . According to the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Sam Taylor was listed as the director on a draft of the screeplay dated 15 Oct 1931. Although he received a co-directing credit on screen, Taylor may have directed only the retakes on the ... More Less

Booth Tarkington's novel was serialized in Ladies' Home Journal (Sep 1926--Jan 1927). A working title for this film was The Plutocrat , and it was reviewed as such in HR . According to the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library, Sam Taylor was listed as the director on a draft of the screeplay dated 15 Oct 1931. Although he received a co-directing credit on screen, Taylor may have directed only the retakes on the film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Feb 32
p. 10.
HF
30 May 31
p. 24.
HF
20 Jun 31
p. 24.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 31
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
15-Aug-31
---
New York Times
13 Feb 32
p. 23.
Photoplay
1 Oct 31
p. 48.
Variety
16 Feb 32
p. 24.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Adpt and dial
New scenes for retakes
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Bus mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Plutocrat by Arthur Goodrich (New York, 20 Feb 1930), and the novel of the same name by Booth Tarkington (New York, 1927).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Plutocrat
Release Date:
6 March 1932
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 12 February 1932
Production Date:
late May--late June 1931
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
30 November 1931
Copyright Number:
LP2829
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70 or 76
Length(in feet):
7,158
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Earl Tinker, a razor blade manufacturer from the Midwest, takes his wife and daughter Olivia on a pleasure cruise to the Middle East. Pleasure quickly turns into business when Earl finds W. H. White, the head of the Straightback Co., Earl's chief competitor, is on board the ship, plotting to discover the secret of Earl's financial success. Unknown to Earl, his rival has employed Madame Momora, an opportunist in disguise as a psychic, to learn of his business plans. In a fortune-telling session, Earl tells Momora of his plans to corner the Damascus steel market and push Straightback out of business. Meanwhile, Olivia has become romantically involved with Lawrence Ogle, a snobbish young playwright whose latest play closed in New York in financial disaster. Realizing that Olivia is Tinker's daughter, and having accidentally read a telegram revealing White's scheme, Ogle alerts Earl to the impending danger. Earl foils White's plans by disguising himself as the chief soothsayer and fooling Madame Momora into confessing her scheme with White. Unfortunately, before Earl can get out of costume, his wife, jealous of her husband's recent attentions to Mamora, arrives to have her fortune told. Although Earl puts on the act for her, she discovers his identity upon leaving, but keeps it to herself. After Earl reveals his identity to Madame Momora, she warns him about the dangers that await him in the desert near Damascus--dangers that she herself has planned for him. Momora follows Earl into the desert with a radio, which she uses to impress the Arabs and to persuade them to have Earl arrested and killed. While Earl is abducted and faces execution, ... +


Earl Tinker, a razor blade manufacturer from the Midwest, takes his wife and daughter Olivia on a pleasure cruise to the Middle East. Pleasure quickly turns into business when Earl finds W. H. White, the head of the Straightback Co., Earl's chief competitor, is on board the ship, plotting to discover the secret of Earl's financial success. Unknown to Earl, his rival has employed Madame Momora, an opportunist in disguise as a psychic, to learn of his business plans. In a fortune-telling session, Earl tells Momora of his plans to corner the Damascus steel market and push Straightback out of business. Meanwhile, Olivia has become romantically involved with Lawrence Ogle, a snobbish young playwright whose latest play closed in New York in financial disaster. Realizing that Olivia is Tinker's daughter, and having accidentally read a telegram revealing White's scheme, Ogle alerts Earl to the impending danger. Earl foils White's plans by disguising himself as the chief soothsayer and fooling Madame Momora into confessing her scheme with White. Unfortunately, before Earl can get out of costume, his wife, jealous of her husband's recent attentions to Mamora, arrives to have her fortune told. Although Earl puts on the act for her, she discovers his identity upon leaving, but keeps it to herself. After Earl reveals his identity to Madame Momora, she warns him about the dangers that await him in the desert near Damascus--dangers that she herself has planned for him. Momora follows Earl into the desert with a radio, which she uses to impress the Arabs and to persuade them to have Earl arrested and killed. While Earl is abducted and faces execution, Ogle and Olivia take Earl's wife into the desert to find Earl. Cleverly, Earl manages to escape and, after using Momora's radio to broadcast the news that the Tinker Company has bought out the Straightback Company, then convinces the Arabs to arrest Momora. At a desert meal, Mrs. Tinker learns that cous-cous is a food, not a code word for Earl's affair with Momora, and thus realizes that her husband was never unfaithful to her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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